Call for Papers: Celebrations in the eastern Mediterranean: private and public

Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies, University of Birmingham, 1 June 2019

Deadline: 7 April 2019

We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers in celebration of the 20th Postgraduate Colloquium of the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies at the University of Birmingham,UK.

Papers and posters are invited for the 20th Annual Postgraduate Colloquium at the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies. From antiquity to the present peoples in the eastern Mediterranean have taken part in celebrations and ceremonies. These vary from large-scale public events to private and personal rituals. As we continue to take part in social rituals derived from these traditions and develop new ways to manifest them it is important to examine these celebrations in detail. The colloquium aims to approach the subject from a variety of perspectives on how people experience celebrations across the eastern Mediterranean from late antiquity to the modern day, from textual sources to visual culture and archaeology.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:
– Feast days and holidays
– Processions
– Secular and religious ceremonies
– Gift Giving
– Secular and religious ceremonies
– Festivals
– Anniversaries, holidays, weddings
– Spaces and Objects
– Celebrations in texts and arts

Papers of approximately 20 minutes or posters (A3 format) related to any of the fields covered by Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies are welcome. Please submit abstracts of no more than 250 words no later than the Sunday 7th April 2019 to 2019CBOMGSColloquium@gmail.com. A selection of papers will be published in the proceedings on the online journal Diogenes (https://gemuob.wordpress.com/diogenes/)

Further information can be found on the conference webpage: https://gemuob.wordpress.com/annual-colloquium-3/

Come and celebrate with us!

Call for Articles: Akropolis: Journal of Hellenic Studies

Deadline: 15 May 2019

Akropolis: Journal of Hellenic Studies now accepts submissions for volume 3 (2019). Please submit your manuscript by 15 May 2019.

Manuscripts should be submitted via the online submission system: http://helenskestudije.me/ojs/index.php/jhs/about/submissions

Please check carefully the Author submission guidelines, as well as our Ethics and Malpractice Statement. Authors are required to follow closely the citation format, and papers written by non-native English authors are required to have their manuscripts proofread by a native English speaker. The editors reserve the right to reject all manuscript that do not strictly adhere to above mentioned guidelines, even before the peer reviewed process.

Akropolis: Journal of Hellenic Studies is an international peer-reviewed, open access scholarly journal, devoted to the study of Hellenic culture and civilization from antiquity to the present, featuring high-quality research articles and book reviews in all areas of Hellenic studies: philosophy, religion, archaeology, history, law, politics, literature, philology, art. High quality contributions – regardless of tradition, school of thought or disciplinary background – are welcome. The editorial board equally values disciplinary and interdisciplinary studies. Book reviews are also welcome.

Seminar series: UoL Working Seminar on Editing Byzantine Texts

Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, University of London, 1 February-29 March 2019

The University of London Working Seminar on Editing Byzantine Texts continues its work preparing a new annotated edition and translation of the lengthy Correspondence of George of Cyprus (Ecumenical Patriarch Gregory II, 1283-89). Scholars and graduate students from University of London Colleges, other Colleges and Universities, and visiting students and academics interested in Byzantine texts, are most welcome to participate. The Seminar is meeting at the Institute of Historical Research, Pollard Room (N301), Senate House, University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E in February and March 2019 on Fridays 15:00-17:00, starting from 1 February 2019. To celebrate the 35th Anniversary of the Seminar (1984-2019) a special reunion of old and current members will be held at Royal Holloway, University of London, 11 Bedford Square, Bedford Room, London WC1B 3RF on 29 March 2019 at 6pm. For further information please contact Ch.Dendrinos@rhul.ac.uk and Christopher.Wright@rhul.ac.uk

Conference: Processions: Urban Ritual in Byzantium and Neighboring Lands

Byzantine Studies Symposium, Dumbarton Oaks Music Room, Washington DC, USA, 12-13 April 2019

Military, civic, and religious processions were hallmarks of the ancient and medieval world; they continued into the Renaissance and, indeed, continue to this day. Yet the Byzantine procession has not yet been subjected to any synthetic, historicizing, contextualizing, or comparative examination.

Understanding processions is critical for our appreciation of how urban space worked and was manipulated in the Middle Ages. For the 2019 Dumbarton Oaks Byzantine Symposium, speakers will examine texts, artifacts, and images in order to develop a new understanding of medieval urban life across multiple social registers. For example, records of processions show us what kinds of public behavior were acceptable, and when, and where. Studying processions introduces us to new protagonists as well, for processions involve audiences as well as participants, and groups hitherto virtually invisible, such as the team of people who prepared for the event by decorating the streets, will be brought to light. The Byzantine commitment to processions is striking in terms of the resources and time allocated: there were as many as two processions a week in Constantinople, many involving the patriarch and the emperor. In the Latin West, the Crusader States, and in the Fatimid, Ottoman, and Muscovite worlds, by comparison, processions occurred far less frequently: the procession was significantly more important to the Byzantines than to their neighbors and successors. The comparative study of Byzantine processions to be offered by the speakers at the symposium will reveal how the Byzantines operated in a complex global network defined by local contexts, how the Byzantines positioned themselves within this network, and the nature of the Byzantine legacy to the Islamic, Catholic, and Orthodox inheritors of their culture.

For further infromation, see https://www.doaks.org/research/byzantine/scholarly-activities/processions.

Summer School: International Byzantine Greek Summer School

Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, 14 July – 10 August 2019

Deadline: 12 April 2019

The Department of Classics at Trinity College Dublin is delighted to welcome back the International Byzantine Greek Summer School (IBGSS) in July–August 2019. This well-established course, directed by Dr Anthony Hirst in Belfast, Birmingham and Dublin since 2002, teaches Byzantine Greek at Beginners, Intermediate and Advanced level and allows early learners to engage with original medieval and late antique Greek texts from the start.

Course dates:
Level 1 Beginners: 14–27 July 2019
Level 2/2.5 Intermediate: 28 July – 10 August 2019
Level 3 Advanced Reading: 28 July – 10 August 2019

For further information and applications, see http://www.tcd.ie/Classics/byzantine/

Call for papers: Narration in Byzantium: Synchronic and Diachronic Narratological Perspectives

3rd Byzantine Colloquium of the University of Buenos Aires, Section of Medieval Philology – Institute of Classical Philology, Faculty of Philosophy and Literature, University of Buenos Aires, 29–30 August 2019

Deadline: 31 May 2019

The last years have witnessed a surge of narratological studies focusing on the vast Byzantine literary and artistic production, a recent example being the volume Storytelling in Byzantium. Narratological Approaches to Byzantine Texts and Images (ed. Ch. Messis – M. MulleJ – I. Nilsson). Today, Byzantinists apply sophisticated narratological techniques not only to narrative texts, but also to images and, in line with M. Fludernik’s theory, to non-narrative texts. A common language and a shared theoretical framework would be instrumental in making Byzantine narratological studies more unitary, in fostering the transdisciplinary dialogue with other fields of research, such as Classical, Medieval and Renaissance Studies, and in popularizing it among wider audiences.

In that context, the present colloquium wishes to provide Byzantinists and specialists in other disciplines with a forum of discussion and reflection on the narratological tools applied to their respective corpora, in order to conceptualize the specificity (or absence thereof) of Byzantine narration, from a synchronic and diachronic point of view, and to compare it, utilizing well-stablished and shared analytical categories, with other literary and artistic productions, contemporary or not.

We invite 20-minute papers on any topic pertinent to narrative in Byzantium in the widest sense. Please send your abstract no later than May 31, 2019 to tomas.fernandez@conicet.gov.ar, pablo.a.cavallero@gmail.com and reinhart.ceulemans@kuleuven.be.

Abstracts should 1000 characters or less (blank spaces included, but not counting bibliographical references), and should clearly state the hypothesis, goals and (expected) conclusions of the presentation.

Attendance of the conference will amount to 30 US$ ($500 for Argentina residents; $400 for members of SAEMED, AADEC or CAEBIZ). For students, doctoral students and research assistants, attendance is free.

Papers must be sent no later than July 19, 2019. 8 pp. Palatino Linotype 11; space between lines: 1½. Margins: 2 cm

The Bryer Fund


 
The Bryer Postgraduate Travel Fund was established in 2017 in memory of Prof. Anthony Bryer, who passed away on 22nd October 2016. The fund exists to support innovative, experimental and adventurous research by post-graduate researchers in Byzantine studies, particularly by supporting travel for research beyond the scope of conference grants or other structured events.

Following very successful initial fundraising, and thanks to the generosity of donors within and outside the field of Byzantine studies, the Fund will begin to award grants from March 2019. However fundraising continues, with the aim of increase the sums available to support research. Donations can now be made online via our website.

Call for articles: Akropolis: Journal of Hellenic Studies

Akropolis: Journal of Hellenic Studies is an international peer-reviewed, open access scholarly journal, devoted to the study of Hellenic culture and civilization from antiquity to the present, featuring high-quality research articles and book reviews in all areas of Hellenic studies: philosophy, religion, archaeology, history, law, politics, literature, philology, art.

High quality contributions – regardless of tradition, school of thought or disciplinary background – are welcome. The editorial board equally values disciplinary and interdisciplinary studies. The highest editorial standard is ensured by the international character and disciplinary expertise of the editorial board.

Akropolis is published annually by the Center for Hellenic Studies, based in Podgorica, Montenegro.

Papers in all fields of Hellenic studies and dealing with all periods of Greek culture and civilization, as well as comparative studies, are welcome. All submissions will go through a double-blind review process.

Please submit your paper through the online system, following the instructions.

Alternatively, please send your paper via email.

Seminar Series: University of Birmingham Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies 2018/19

The Centre’s General Seminar normally meets in the Whitting Room (436), 4th floor, Arts Building on Thursdays at 5.15pm, unless otherwise stated and is open to all interested in the related concerns of the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies.

AUTUMN TERM 2018

11 Oct: Students of the Centre
Travellers’ Tales

18 Oct: Georgios Chatzelis (Athens)
Invention and reality in Byzantine historical narratives: the impact of Polyaenus and military manuals on the Alexiad of Anna Komnene

25 Oct: Maroula Perisanidi (Leeds)
Equines and the margins of Byzantine power: humility or humiliation?

1 Nov: Cecily Hennessy (London)
Byzantine influence in Winchester Cathedral?

15 Nov: Maria Papadaki (Edinburgh)
Current archaeological research on settlement and provincial life in the Byzantine Mediterranean: the case of the Peloponnese

22 Nov: Paul Magdalino (St Andrews)
The church of St John the Theologian and the End of Antiquity in Constantinople
(Annual SPBS Autumn Lecture)

29 Nov: Marc Baer (London)
Sultans as saviors: early modern Mediterranean Jewish accounts of the Ottoman rulers

6 Dec: Ethan Menchinger (Manchester)
Ottoman dreams of destiny and omens of greatness

13 Dec: Ioulia Kolovou (Glasgow)
Reconfiguring the template: Representations of powerful women in historical fiction — the case of Anna Komnene
(Joint Seminar with CESMA)

SPRING TERM 2019

24 Jan: Alexandra Vukovich (Oxford)
Interpreting the Constantinopolitan landscape: A Rus traveller in Byzantium

31 Jan: Ceyda Karamürsel (London)
Unlikely migrants: slavery, emancipation, and race in the Reform-Era Ottoman Mediterranean

7 Feb: Brian McLaughlin (London)
Kantakouzenos’ daemon: providence and persuasion in late Byzantine historiography

14 Feb: Huw Halstead (St Andrews)
‘Remnants of Byzantium’: the uses of the past by the expatriated Greeks of Turkey

28 Feb: Gonda Van Steen (London)
Greek Adoptees Anonymous: adoption, memory and Cold War Greece

7 Mar: Michael Talbot (London)
Consular networks, shipping routes, and the Ottoman world in the late 19th century

14 Mar: Miltos Pechlivanos (Berlin)
Francis Bacon in Ancient Greek. Nikolaos Mavrokordatos (1680-1730) and cultural mobility

21 Mar: Theofili Kampianaki (Birmingham)
Flavius Josephus in medieval Greek and Latin Histories: some cross-cultural approaches

Seminar Series: CHS 2018-19 Late Antique & Byzantine Seminar Series at King’s College London

Through its regular series of seminars, colloquia, public lectures and international conferences, the Centre for Hellenic Studies is a concentrated force for the advancement of research in all aspects of Hellenic culture.

All its activities are free, open to the public and designed to be accessible to a wide audience.

Semester 1

Convened by Vicky Manolopoulou

Tuesday 25 September, 17.30
Understanding settlements in Byzantine Greece: Old data and new approaches for the Peloponnese (11th -12th eleventh centuries)
K2.29 Council Room
A seminar with Maria Papadaki (University of Edinburgh / University of Patras).

Tuesday 9 October, 17.30
Equines and the margins of Byzantine power: Humility or humiliation?
K2.29 Council Room.
A seminar with Maroula Perisanidi (University of Leeds).

Tuesday 23 October, 17.30
Identifying Medieval burials – what to do with unexpected Byzantines?
River Room
A seminar with Sophie Moore.

Tuesday 13 November, 17.30
Revising the chronology of Late Antique Ephesus: Urban phasing and epigraphic landscapes
K2.29 Council Room.
A seminar with Luke Lavan (University of Kent).

 

Semester 2

Convened by Petros Bouras-Vallianatos

Tuesday 22 January, 17.30
A Rus traveller in Constantinople
K2.29 Council Room.
A seminar with Alexandra Vukovich (University of Cambridge).

Tuesday 5 February, 17.30
Commemorative religious processions in Byzantine Constantinople
K2.29 Council Room.
A seminar with Vicky Manolopoulou (King’s College London).

Tuesday 26 February, 17.30
Approaching Byzantine slavery
K2.29 Council Room.
A seminar with Marek Jankowiak (Oxford).

Tuesday 12 March, 17.30
Foreign trade in the early Byzantine Empire: beyond the Silk Road
River Room
A seminar with Rebecca Darley (Birkbeck).

Tuesday 26 March, 17.30
The earliest traces of Christianisation from northeastern Italy and a newly discovered late antique inscription from Venice
K2.29 Council Room.
A seminar with Lorenzo Calvelli (Venice).

For further information see: https://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/ahri/centres/chs/events/events.aspx