Call for Papers: ‘Byzantium between East and West’, Mediterranean Historical Review Special Issue

Deadline: 31 March 2020

David Jacoby, one of the leading historians of Byzantium, passed away in October 2018. Prof. Jacoby was a member of the international board of the Mediterranean Historical Review, and contributed to it in various ways. His research in the fields of trade, economy and society, revealed not only the Mediterranean aspects of these Byzantine activities, but also the importance that Byzantine history holds for the study of the Mediterranean. We regret this loss very much. To commemorate his lifelong achievements in the field of Mediterranean history, the MHR intends to publish a special issue dedicated to the theme “Byzantium between East and West”. We invite scholars to propose articles addressing this theme in view of the special position of Byzantium between the Levant, Eastern Europe and the Latin West. Byzantium boasts a history of over 12 centuries, maybe more than any other Mediterranean civilization. We wish to address the unique position it held, both geographically and chronologically, in the history of the region. Papers may deal with any aspect of the subject in history, art history or archaeology, in any timeframe (narrow or wide) and in local, global or entangled perspective. All papers will be peer-reviewed following the Journal’s normal evaluation process.

The call for papers is also available at https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09518967.2019.1594088.

Call for Articles: Frankokratia: A Journal for the Study of Greek Lands under Latin Rule (to appear from 2020)

Frankokratia (Gr. Φραγκοκρατία, or ‘Frankish rule’) is a peer-reviewed scholarly journal committed to publishing original research on all areas of the Greek world where Latin (‘Roman Catholic’) populations from western Europe settled in the aftermath of the crusades. Collectively known as ‘Franks’ in the East irrespective of their exact place of origin, these settlers established shorter- or longer-lived polities on lands formerly belonging to the Byzantine Empire and inhabited by people of the Greek (‘Orthodox’) and various Eastern Christian rites, Jews and Muslims. Although the core focus of the journal lies on the regions conquered in the context of the Third and Fourth Crusades, to embrace the full breadth of this phenomenon the journal’s chronological and geographical scope ranges widely from the conquests of Southern Italy and Antioch in the eleventh century to the fall of the last Venetian colonies in the eighteenth century.

Frankokratia has been conceived as an interdisciplinary forum bringing together innovative work by specialists in archaeology, architecture, art, codicology, culture, diplomacy, economics, language, law, literature, musicology, numismatics, politics, religion, society, theology, war, and all related topics. Moreover, it aspires to bridge the perennial epistemological divide between western medieval and Byzantine studies and to overcome the mutual isolation of specialists on Greece, Cyprus, and other regions, offering a venue for the publication of collaborative research efforts and encouraging the fruitful cross-pollination between these and other fields. The journal welcomes the submission of both broader historiographical surveys and more focused studies, including essays presenting previously unpublished source material in the form of texts and images. This versatility in terms of content and methodology will allow Frankokratia to broach the multifaceted issues raised by the study of the complex societies of the Greco-Latin sphere in a more holistic fashion, helping weave a richer tapestry of the history and culture of the post-classical Mediterranean.

For further information, see: https://brill.com/view/journals/fra/fra-overview.xml