Public Lecture: From the Fall of Rome to Byzantium: New Light from DNA, Ice Cores, and Harvard’s Science of the Human Past

Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, D.C., USA, 1 May 2019

Historians and archaeologists have long debated the processes that ended the ancient world and gave rise to the civilizations of Byzantium, the medieval West, and Islam. The advances of archaeology are delivering ever more material pieces of the past that are suitable for expanding scientific toolkits, featuring ancient DNA, ice cores, and digital humanities. Come learn how—from senior faculty members to freshmen—historians, archaeologists, geneticists, biomolecular archaeologists, and computer and climate scientists at Harvard University are working together, and in concert with our American and international partners, to expand what we know about the fall of Rome and the origins of Byzantium, as science, archaeology, and history combine to begin a new day in the discovery of ancient and medieval civilization.

Professor Michael McCormick is Francis Goelet Professor of Medieval History at Harvard, and chairs the university-wide Initiative for the Science of the Human Past (SoHP), an interdisciplinary research network that brings together geneticists, archaeological scientists, climatologists, computer scientists, humanists, and social scientists to explore great questions of human history from our origins in Africa to our migrations across the globe. He is director in Cambridge of the new Max Planck-Harvard Research Center for the Archaeoscience of the Ancient Mediterranean. McCormick has written numerous monographs and articles, including the award-winning Origins of the European Economy: Communications and Commerce, AD 300–900 (Cambridge University Press, 2001). He codirects the Historical Ice Core Project, a joint project of SoHP and the Climate Change Institute (University of Maine) that uses ancient ice to reconstruct the environmental and economic history of Europe back to antiquity; and the archaeoscientific excavation of the lost Visigothic royal capital at Reccopolis, Spain.

For details and registration: https://www.doaks.org/research/byzantine/scholarly-activities/mccormick-lecture

Call for Papers: Waste Not Want Not: Food And Thrift From Antiquity To The Present

Faculty of English, University of Cambridge, 12-13 September 2019

Deadline: 31 May 2019

The Cambridge Body and Food Histories group is delighted to announce the call for papers for its second annual conference. This day-and-a-half conference will bring together academics and professionals working within the interdisciplinary fields of food studies and food sustainability research, to reflect on past and present attitudes towards food preservation and waste. Part of an ongoing historiographical effort to better understand consuming behaviours through time, the conference aims to open up a dialogue between historians and policy makers. Using both past and present as critical lenses, the event will serve as a platform for the discussion of more sustainable food practice in the present and future.

Keynote addresses will be delivered by Dr Amanda Herbert (Folger Institute, Washington), and Dr Simon Werrett (UCL).

Please see the full details below or on our website.

We invite proposals for 20 minute papers from researchers in any discipline and at any stage in their career working on FOOD WASTE AND/OR FOOD SUSTAINABILITY practices in any period of history.

Abstracts of 300 words max. should be emailed to foodandthrift@yahoo.com by the deadline 31st May 2019.

Themes may include, but are not limited to:
– Food preservation – methods and implements for preserving food; the temporalities of food itself (seasonality, the potential for decay)
– Management of food waste – methods and implements for disposing of or reusing food waste
– Spaces of food preservation and waste – the factory, workplace, home etc.
– Historical issues of food insecurity and food inequality – economic reasons for ‘thrift’ and their relationship to class/wealth
– Food waste as a moral/religious/political issue – the wider (cultural) frameworks within which food waste/’thrift’ has been understood
– Questions of memory and time – the role of food waste/’thrift’ in visions of the (utopian/ dystopian) future; tendencies to characterise particular periods as excessive or frugal; the impact of these visions on the present

This conference is designed to generate an interdisciplinary discussion between scholars from a wide variety of fields: archaeology, history, geography, anthropology, and sociology, among others. The conference will also feature a roundtable discussion with representatives from the third sector.

Any questions should be sent direct to foodandthrift@yahoo.com

This conference is generously funded by The University of Cambridge AHRC DTP

Summer School: RelReS Summer School

Sofia University, Bulgaria, 22-27 September 2019

Deadline: 31 August 2019

The University in Sofia is pleased to announce the ReIReS School 22-27 September 2019 on the use and study of special documents. Especially – but not only – PhD students and postdocs are welcome, both from ReIReS partners and other institutions.

The school in Sofia will make scholars familiar with special, less known and remote collections like the unique collection of Greek, Arabic and Slavonic manuscripts in Center Dujcev, the digital version of the Zographou manuscripts collection, which is not accessible in situ (on the Mount Athos in Greece) to female researchers; with the history of Bulgarian Church and religious literature and the history of the oldest and biggest Bulgarian monastery and its role for preserving the religious identity of the Bulgarian population.

The school is open to scholars affiliated to the ReIReS consortium and to max. five persons from outside the consortium. Scholars from outside the consortium will pay a registration fee of € 395.00.

For full information, see the School’s webpage.

Call for Papers: Dis/embodiment and Im/materiality: Uncovering the Body, Gender and Sexuality in Philosophies of Late Antiquity. In Memoriam Marianne Saghy (1961‒2018)

Central European University, Budapest, Hungary, 6-8 June 2019

Deadline: 28 April 2019

In his book From Shame to Sin: The Christian Transformation of Sexual Morality in Late Antiquity, Kyle Harper emphasizes that Christianity had made an enormous difference in how late ancient men and women conceptualized their passions and sexual activities. Also, feminist critics of ancient philosophical theories have focused on theories of matter. Fascinated by Aristotle’s identification of matter with privation, ugliness and femininity, they often tend to consider mainstream philosophies as sexist and the positive evaluation of matter and body as the
gauge of the liberation of the female gender. Moreover, there is a tendency to link the Christian dichotomy of spirit and flesh to these philosophical theories. On the other hand, Late Antique scholars, following the lead of Peter Brown, have pointed to the function of sexual renunciation in early Christianity in liberating women from their traditional roles played in the Roman society. Yet, rarely if ever do scholars who are engaged in gender and sexuality studies attempt to conduct a comprehensive and in-depth study into these interrelated phenomena, while mainstream scholarship on these often turns a blind eye to the gendered perspective.

The impact of the philosophical theories of matter upon the dogmatic debates between Christians and non-Christians, as well as between the diverse Christian theological trends, are largely unexplored and even less clear are the practical spiritual and social consequences of the adoption of one or another theory. The twentieth century has seen a vast array of studies in theories of matter from metaphysical and cosmological perspectives. The dogmatic history of pre-Christian philosophies and metaphysics is now largely written. However, these bodies of literature have rarely intersected with methodologies from feminist theory and philosophy. In turn, feminist scholars often neglect important moments and aspects of the history of Christianity, to radicalize a positive evaluation of embodiment or a negative one of disembodiment. Also, an outstanding task remains to extend these investigations to the world beyond the Mediterranean and to involve into them parallel phenomena in other philosophies and renunciatory traditions, Jainism, Buddhism and in the new Hinduism born in the Middle Ages from a reaction against these reformatory trends.

This conference aims at contributing to an eventual closure of the gap between the aforementioned fields. It will focus on the continuity and change in the social perception and role of the body, gender and sexuality in Late Antiquity, on intersections of gender studies, history of sexuality, feminist philosophy, philosophies of late antiquity, patristic and Gnostic studies, the history of asceticism, the history of Indian philosophy. It aims to bring together scholars of Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages to explore how novel theories on late antique Greco-Roman and Indian philosophy, early Christianity, Gnosticism, Buddhism and Jainism connect to gender and sexuality studies. The profiles targeted are both graduate students and early- to mid-career researchers. This conference thus has the ambition to attract specialists in the above fields and also to generate discussions on the relevance of feminist methodologies and their adequacy to the existing interpretative literature, and vice versa. We are inviting papers trying to give answers to the questions above.

CALL FOR PAPERS
Graduate students and early to mid-career researchers are encouraged to apply for participation in this conference. Abstracts proposal should include: name, affiliation, short bio (200 words max), abstract text (up to 500 words), and keywords. Please indicate if you need special assistance and tech for your presentation. Please submit paper abstract proposal via email to Stanimir Panayotov: panayotov_stanimir@phd.ceu.edu.

Deadline for abstract proposals extended: April 28, 2019.

Notification to applicants: May 5, 2019

Email subject should be: DISMAT Budapest 2019

Presentations should be 20 mins long. There is no participation fee for this conference. All admitted presenters should make their own arrangements and cover travel (including visa) and accommodation expenses. The organizers can offer assistance with visa in special circumstances and where invitation letter is required. All presenters are expected to arrive in Budapest on June 5, 2019. An official welcome dinner and a reception is covered for everybody, as well as group lunch and two coffee breaks per day during conference days. The organizers are planning to publish the conference proceedings as an edited volume with a respected publisher; thus all admitted applicants to this conference are advised to take this into consideration.

This conference is co-organized by Department of Medieval Studies and Department of Gender Studies at Central European University, Budapest, in partnership with Hungarian Patristic Society, and is funded by CEU’s Conferences and Academic Events Fund.

https://medievalstudies.ceu.edu/article/2018-09-24/memoriam-marianne-saghy

Call for Papers: Historical Inertia: Continuity in the Face of Change 500-1500 CE

3rd Annual Edinburgh International Graduate Conference in Late Antique, Islamic and Byzantine Studies

Deadline: 3 June 2019

Historical discourse has long concerned itself with patterns of change and discontinuity to demonstrate and validate models of periodisation and the compartmentalisation of the wider historical field. Building on these themes, this conference has chosen to focus on the opposing view by concentrating on inertia – how history, material culture, ideas and communities can be seen to maintain a stayed course or deviate if a significant force is exerted upon it. Inertia, a concept that has yet to be applied to mainstream Late Antique studies, introduces perspectives and frameworks that permit new approaches to traditional processes.

This conference will be hosted by the Late Antique, Islamic and Byzantine Society of the University of Edinburgh on the 22 – 23 November 2019 and will tackle the notion of inertia and the implications accompanying it for Late Antique, Islamic and Byzantine history from 500-1500 CE.

We particularly encourage contributions on the following topics:
• Dynastic and Political Changes: Patterns of continuity across ruling classes, court-life and dynastic succession.
• A View from Below – Story of the Common Masses: The role of perceived ‘minority’ groups (religious, ethnic or cultural) that constituted the numerical majority of the population but are ignored or omitted in sources written for/by the dominant group.
• Patterns of Trade and Economic Infrastructure: ‘domestic or foreign’.
• Forms of Expression and Transmission: Listening through language, art and ideas.
• Frontiers (and beyond): Military, diplomatic or cultural interactions across linguistic and political delimitations.

We strongly encourage papers from postgraduate students and early career researchers from all disciplines (Archaeology, Art History, History, Theology etc.) which take advantage of interdisciplinary source-critical approaches.

Poster Presentations:
There will be a special poster session held during the conference of 1 hour, which will take place on Saturday afternoon, allowing for discussion with the authors. The posters will be left up for the duration of the conference so they can also be visited during the breaks and during the reception.

We strongly encourage submissions from undergraduate as well as graduate students. The poster size cannot exceed 70cm (width) x 100cm (height)

Deadlines:
Deadline for abstracts is the 3rd of June and notification of acceptance will be confirmed by mid-June. Please submit your abstract of no more than 300 words, and a 100-word professional biography to edibyzpg@ed.ac.uk. Please indicate on your abstract if you are submitting for poster or paper. We kindly welcome submissions from individuals or groups. There will be a small registration fee of £15 and lunch will be provided on both days. We will aim to publish a selection of the papers in a peer-reviewed volume that will bring together the strongest contributions in each area to produce an edited volume of high-quality, deep coherence and rich variety.

The organising committee, P. Harrison, A. Nayfa, S. Nwokoro, L. Pecorini and A. Stockhammer.

Call for Papers: Third International Conference On Byzantine And Medieval Studies (CBMS)

The Byzantinist Society Of Cyprus, Third International Conference On Byzantine And Medieval Studies (CBMS)

Deadline: 6 September 2019

The Byzantinist Society of Cyprus (ΒΕΚ: Βυζαντινολογική Εταιρεία Κύπρου) invites papers to be presented at the Third International Conference on Byzantine and Medieval Studies, to be held in Nicosia, Cyprus, between the 17th and the 19th of January 2020.

Honorary President: Theodoros Giagkou, Professor, University of Thessaloniki

Keynote Speaker: Enrico Zanini, Professor, Università di Siena

Scholars, researchers and students are encouraged to present their ongoing research, work-in- progress or fieldwork report on any aspect of the history, archaeology, art, architecture, literature, philosophy and religion of Cyprus and the broader Mediterranean region during the Byzantine, Medieval and Ottoman periods. The languages of the conference will be Greek, English, French and German.

Scientific and Organizing Committee:
Nikolas Bakirtzis (Chair), Stavros Georgiou, Doria Nicolaou, Andriani Georgiou, Christina Kakkoura, Rania Michail, Thomas Costi, Ourania Perdiki, Despina Papacharalampous, Thanasis Koutoupas, Christina Roditou, Andreas Foulias.

Paper proposal submission material:
Every paper proposal submission must be accompanied by an abstract between 300 and 500 words summarizing the presented research, report or work-in-progress and indicating its original contribution.

Please provide the requested information and submit your abstracts using our online application forms:
Paper proposal: https://forms.gle/BEyHbKaDZNTBjxff6

Sessions of up to five papers can be submitted together in the following form by the session organizer.
Session proposal: https://forms.gle/DEB38CDQDkMcbD5x8

Paper proposals will be reviewed based on their abstract and accepted on merit. This review will be anonymous. Notification of paper review will be send by email by the beginning of October, 2019. Papers will be grouped in sessions according to their topic and theme. Each participant may deliver only one paper limited to 20 minutes. Accepted paper abstracts will be published in the conference’s ‘Book of Abstracts’.

Graduate Paper Awards: The best graduate student papers will be selected and awarded upon the conclusion of the conference.

The conference is organized by the Byzantinist Society of Cyprus. For membership information please visit the society’s website: http://www.byzantinistsociety.org.cy

For inquiries send email to: cbms2020@byzantinistsociety.org.cy

Paper proposal preparation instructions

When submitting your proposal through our online application form, you will be asked to provide the following information:

Name, position or graduate status and academic affiliation (i.e.. Prof., University of…), email address, address, phone, title of paper, abstract.

If you encounter technical difficulties with our online application form, you may also send us your proposal via email (cbms2020@byzantinistsociety.org.cy), in the following format:
Prepare the paper proposal as a single Microsoft WORD document. Font: Times New Roman, 12 point. Line spacing: single.

Cover Sheet
Include the following information in the listed order. Please align text left and allow a blank line between each information detail:

Name, position or graduate status and academic affiliation (i.e. Prof., University of…), address, phone, email address, title of paper.

Abstract
Title line: No more than two lines. Do not use an all capital-letters title. Boldface and centered. Skip one line.

Author line: Author’s name followed by institutional affiliation in parentheses or, for independent scholars their city. No titles or degrees (i.e. Prof., Dr, PhD).. Boldface and centered. Lower case, capitalize first letters of words. Skip two lines.

Abstract text: Justify text. No intend in the first line of paragraphs. Skip one line between paragraphs. Foreign language words transliterated and italicized. No footnotes or images. The abstract text is the sole responsibility of the author/s and will be included in the Book of Abstracts.

Job: Lectureship in Classics (Roman Studies)

University College Cork, Ireland

Deadline: 30 April 2019

Permanent Whole-time Post

UCC wishes to appoint an experienced academic to the role of Lecturer in Classics (Roman Studies). Reporting to the Head of the Department of Classics, the Lecturer in Classics (Roman Studies) will have a specialist interest in an area of Roman Studies complementing the existing strengths of the department in Latin literature and Roman history. Potential areas of interest include, but are not limited to, art, Greek literature, philosophy, and scientific texts of the Roman Imperial or Late Antique periods. The successful candidate will be required to deliver foundation and advanced teaching on aspects of Roman Studies. S/he will be required to teach classical Greek to an advanced undergraduate level, and may be required to teach classical Latin to a similar level. S/he may also be required to teach in other areas of classical culture or history according to changing departmental needs. Candidates must hold a doctoral qualification in an area of Roman Studies from a recognised University at the time of application. The holder of this post will be expected to promote student research at masters and doctoral level on different aspects of Roman Studies. S/he will also be required to contribute to the academic administration of the department and college, and to engage with external bodies in areas relating to Classics.

Please note that Garda vetting and/or an international police clearance check may form part of the selection process. For an information package including full details of the post, selection criteria and application process see https://ore.ucc.ie/. The University, at its discretion, may undertake to make an additional appointment(s) from this competition following the conclusion of the process.

Informal enquiries can be made in confidence to Dr David Woods, Tel: 0035321-4903491, E-mail: d.woods@ucc.ie. Further information on the Department is available at http://www.ucc.ie/en/classics/.

Appointment may be made on the Lectureship Salary Scale: €33,481-€59,132 per annum. Salary placement on appointment will be in accordance with public sector pay policy. Applications must be submitted online via the University College Cork vacancy portal. Queries relating to the online application process should be referred to recruitment@ucc.ie, quoting the job-title.

Candidates should apply, in confidence, before 12 noon (Irish Local Time) on Tuesday 30th April 2019. No late applications will be accepted.

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE CORK IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES EMPLOYER

Please note that an appointment to posts advertised will be dependent on University approval, together with the terms of the employment control framework for the higher education sector

Conference: Byzantine Materiality

St. Vladimir’s Seminary, 575 Scarsdale Rd, Yonkers, NY 10707, USA, 8-11 May 2019

Byzantine Materiality, a conference of the Sacred Arts Initiative, will be held May 8-11, 2019 on the campus of St. Vladimir’s Seminary, 575 Scarsdale Rd, Yonkers, NY 10707. This conference has been made possible by generous support from the Henry Luce Foundation.

Popular descriptions of Byzantium often emphasize the mystical and immaterial while overlooking the mediating role of matter implied by the Christian belief in the incarnation. In the field of art history and across the humanities, a new interest in matter and materials constitutes what is now being referred to as the “material turn” or “new materialisms.”

Conference papers will explore the roles of matter and materials in icons, relics, and the Eucharist; Byzantine churches and their consecration; sensory experiences of liturgy; the neuroscience of viewing icons, and more. Conference speakers include Charles Barber, Roland Betancourt, Peter Bouteneff, Annemarie Weyl Carr, Béatrice Caseau, Mary Farag, Evan Freeman, Holger Klein, Joseph Kopta, Sean Leatherbury, James Magruder, Vasileios Marinis, Harry Prance, Stephanie Rumpza, Richard Schneider, Katherine Taronas, Laura Veneskey, Gary Vikan, and Alicia Walker.

Registration required. For more information, visit: www.byzantinemateriality.com

Scholarship: Connected Clerics: Building a Universal Church in the Late Antique West (380-604 CE)

Royal Holloway, University of London

Deadline: 17 May 2019

Applications are invited for two 3-year PhD studentships grant-funded by the ERC project “Connected Clerics: Building a Universal Church in the Late Antique West (380-604 CE)” [CONNEC].

This project focuses on analysing clerical discourses, conflicts, and laws that contributed to maintaining a relatively cohesive late antique western church despite the fragmentation of the Roman empire and its substitution by smaller kingdoms. The successful candidate will have a chance to acquire expertise in social network analysis and other techniques of digital humanities.

Applications are invited which propose an individual research project involving Latin sources in one of the following two areas:
•Theological and ecclesiological debates concerning the nature of the church as an emerging institution
•Debates over ecclesiastical policy and its implementation

The studentship will run for three years from September 2019 and your annual stipend (non-taxable) will be £13,500 plus fees. An allowance of £2000 per year is also available for additional training, travel, and conference fees. You will also have the possibility to conduct a research stay at an overseas institution. The studentship is open to students of all nationalities.

Queries may be directed to the Principal Investigator, David.Natal@rhul.ac.uk.

Applications (including a cover letter, c.v., 800-word research proposal, and the name of two referees) should be submitted by 5 p.m. Greenwich Mean Time on 17 May 2019 to Royal Holloway.

For further details see https://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BRH184/phd-scholarship-connected-clerics-building-a-universal-church-in-the-late-antique-west-380-604-ce

Fellowship: Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection Library Research Fellowship Program, 2019-2020

University Library at California State University, Sacramento, CA, USA

Deadline: 30 April 2019

Thanks to generous ongoing funding from the Elios Charitable Foundation and additional funding from the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Foundation, the University Library at California State University, Sacramento is pleased to announce the continuation of the Library Research Fellowship Program to support the use of the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection by fellows for scholarly research in Hellenic studies while in residence in Sacramento, CA. The Program provides a limited number of fellowships ranging from $1,000 to $4,000 to help offset transportation and living expenses incurred during the tenure of the awards and is open to external researchers anywhere in the world at the doctoral through senior scholar levels (including independent scholars) working in fields encompassed by the Collection’s strengths who reside outside a 75-mile radius of Sacramento. The term of fellowships can vary between two weeks and three months, depending on the nature of the research, and for the current cycle will be tenable from September 1, 2019-August 31, 2020. The fellowship application deadline is April 30, 2019. No late applications will be considered.

Consisting of the holdings of the former Speros Basil Vryonis Center for the Study of Hellenism, the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection is the premier Hellenic collection in the western United States and one of the largest of its kind in the country, currently numbering approximately 75,000 volumes. It comprises a large circulating book collection, journal holdings, electronic resources, non-print media materials, rare books, archival materials, art and artifacts. With its focus on the Hellenic world, the Collection contains early through contemporary materials across the social sciences and humanities relating to Greece, the Balkans, the Ottoman Empire and modern Turkey, and the surrounding region, with particular strengths in Byzantine, post-Byzantine, and Modern Greek studies, including the Greek diaspora worldwide. There is a broad representation of over 20 languages in the Collection, with a rich assortment of primary source materials. Since 2009 the collection has experienced particularly dramatic growth through several major gift acquisitions. For further information about the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection, visit http://library.csus.edu/tsakopoulos-hellenic-collection.

For the full Library Research Fellowship Program description and application instructions, see: http://library.csus.edu/tsakopoulos-hellenic-collection/lrfp. Questions about the Program can be directed to George I. Paganelis, Curator, Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection (paganelis@csus.edu).