Studentship: 3 Research Fellowships in Late Ancient Philosophy, Biblical Early Christian Studies

Faculty of Arts, Faculty of Philosophy, Faculty of Theology & Religious Studies, KU Leuven, Beglium

Deadline: 1 June 2019

In October 2017, a team of KU Leuven professors consisting of G. Roskam (spokesperson), J. Leemans, P. Van Deun, G. Van Riel, and Joseph Verheyden, has launched an interdisciplinary research project entitled “Longing for Perfection. Living the Perfect Life in Late Antiquity – A Journey Between Ideal and Reality”. The project is funded by the Research Fund of the University of Leuven. The team is now opening a last call to hire a third group of three research fellows at the level of PhD candidate.

Job description
The project studies one of the most fundamental ideas of ancient Greek culture – the search for perfection. For centuries, not only philosophers and theologians, but also other intellectuals have reflected on what this ideal should consist in, devising ways of pursuing it in a wide range of human activities. A major focus is the complex relationship between theory and praxis and between ideal and reality, as found in pagan and Christian Greek literature from the first seven centuries CE. The team has set two main goals: the production of a comprehensive study of the different aspects of ancient ideals of perfection and of a number of in-depth studies of specific problems and core issues related to the overall topic.

Candidates are invited to apply for a full-time, four-year fellowship in one of the following subprojects:
– fellowship 1: a study of the martyr homilies of John Chrysostom.
– fellowship 2: a critical edition and study of the Capita theologica et oeconomica of Maximus the Confessor.
– fellowship 3: a study of the reception of the figures of Abraham, Moses and David in early Christian literature.

Requirements
The candidates have a broad and solid competence in late ancient philosophy and preferably also basic knowledge of early Christianity. A strong command of Greek (and preferably also of Latin) is essential, as is the ability to combine historical and philosophical/theological methodologies in an interdisciplinary way. Candidates demonstrating a thorough knowledge of relevant literary sources will be especially attractive; proven expertise in one or more of the research domains is an asset. The team welcomes applications from candidates with an excellent graduate degree (typically M.A.) in Classics or in related disciplines (e.g. Ancient History, Byzantine Studies, Religious Studies).

Applicants should be fluent in at least one of the following languages: English, French or German. The dissertation should as a rule be written in one of these languages.

Salary
The net salary will be approx. €2000/month; in addition the fellowship provides for social benefits and health insurance.
Candidates are offered a unique opportunity to be part of an enthusiastic research group within the context of a dynamic, internationally-oriented academic environment with unrivalled library resources.

How to apply

Applications should include a letter outlining the candidate’s background and motivation, a detailed CV, one writing sample, and at least one letter of recommendation. Candidates are asked to submit the entire file to geert.roskam@kuleuven.be.

A selected number of candidates will be invited to Leuven for an interview on the 20th of June. Starting date: 1 October 2019 (or soon after).

Job: Career Development Fellow in Classics

University of Edinburgh

Deadline: 3 April 2019

The School of History, Classics and Archaeology at the University of Edinburgh seeks to appoint a Career Development Fellow in Classics for one year from 1 September 2019. The Department’s coverage includes Greek and Latin language, literature, and philosophy; ancient history; classical art and archaeology; Byzantine studies, post-Classical Latin, and the classical tradition/ history of reception. Applicants in any of these fields are welcome. The appointee will devote most of their time to the completion of a programme of research, but will also gain experience in research-led teaching and large-scale lecturing and will organise a symposium in the area of their interests. Candidates will normally have obtained their PhD since 31 December 2017.

Salary: UE07 £33,199 to £39,609 per annum.

Closing date: 5pm (GMT) 3rd April 2019.

For details, see https://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BQR449/career-development-fellow-in-classics

Call for Articles: Review of Ecumenical Studies

Lost for Words: Theological and Philosophical Vocabulary in the Aftermath of Chalcedon (RES 3/2019)

Deadline: 1 July 2019

The Council of Chalcedon (451) has been responsible for one of the most remarkable and long-standing splits within Christianity. Conceptual differences between Chalcedonian and (Miaphysite) Non-Chalcedonian Christianity have been lasting for more than fifteen hundred years, and, despite the advancement of the ecumenical dialogue in recent decades, these conundrums prove to be hard to overcome. One of the results of the contemporaneous theological interchange has been the acknowledgment of differences in the vocabulary employed by the supporters and the detractors of the Council. One such example is the use of philosophical language in sixth and seventh century debates, which consequently made room for different terminological interpretations of the nature(s) of Christ. This special issue of RES aims to bring together studies on the understanding of vocabulary differences and similarities between the Chalcedonian and non-Chalcedonian Christian traditions. We invite papers from historians, philologists, theologians and philosophers on the debates that took place in the aftermath of Chalcedon till nowadays. We are particularly looking to contributions on the use of philosophical concepts in a theological frame, such as (but not limited to) genus, species, definition, predication, existence, participation, motion, activity, power, soul, body etc. that may prove relevant for understanding their similarities and differences of use within the Greek, Syriac, and Latin languages. Papers emphasizing the social and political background related to the emergence and development of Chalcedonian debates are also warmly welcome.

The papers must be submitted to: res@ecum.ro

About RES: The Review of Ecumenical Studies About RES publishes articles, essays and reviews which come from the theological field, but also have an interdisciplinary dimension, especially from the fields of philosophy, history, ethics and social sciences, and go through a process of peer review. Decisions are made within four months. The contributions will be published in English or German and must comply with RES’s editorial guidelines. The Call for Papers can also be found here.

Conference: Byzantine Studies Conference (BSC) 2019

University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI, USA, 17-20 October 2019

The 45th Annual Byzantine Studies conference will be held on the University of Wisconsin-Madison Campus on October 17th through October 20th, 2019. Online Registration is now available!

Click here to register! https://uwmadison.eventsair.com/byzantine-studies-conference/

More information on the meeting and venue can be found on the conference website. If you have any questions please contact Conference Management at conferences@union.wisc.edu

Conference: Eclecticism at the Edges

Eclecticism at the Edges: Medieval Art and Architecture at the Crossroads of the Latin, Greek, and Slavic Cultural Spheres (c.1300-c.1550)

Princeton University, USA, 5-9 April 2019

In response to the global turn in art history and medieval studies, “Eclecticism at the Edges” explores the temporal and geographic parameters of the study of medieval art, seeking to challenge the ways in which we think about the artistic production of Eastern Europe from the fourteenth through the sixteenth centuries. This event will serve as a long-awaited platform to examine, discuss, and focus on the eclectic visual cultures of the Balkan Peninsula and the Carpathian Mountains, the specificities, but also the shared cultural heritage of these regions. It will raise issues of cultural contact, transmission, and appropriation of western medieval and Byzantine artistic and cultural traditions in eastern European centers, and consider how this heritage was deployed to shape notions of identity and visual rhetoric in these regions that formed a cultural landscape beyond medieval, Byzantine, and modern borders.

For full information, see https://ima.princeton.edu/conferences/. Note that the symposium is free but reigstration is necessary to guarantee a place.

Conference: Dissidence and Persecution in Byzantium

20th Australasian Association for Byzantine Studies Conference, Macquarie University, Sydney, 19-21 July 2019

The Byzantine empire was rarely a stable and harmonious state during its long and eventful history. It was often in strife with those outside its borders and with those within them, and with so much power invested in its political and ecclesiastical structures it was ready to implode at times. This could result in persecution and the silencing of dissident voices from various quarters of society. The mechanisms by which the authorities controlled civil disorder and dissent, as well as discouraging criticism of imperial policies, could be brutal at times. In what sense was it possible, if at all, to enjoy freedom of speech and action in Byzantium? Was the law upheld or ignored when vested interests were at stake? How vulnerable did minorities feel and how conformist was religious belief at the end of the day? The theme of the conference aims to encourage discussion on a number fronts relating to the use and abuse of power within the history of Byzantium.

Keynote speakers:

Professor David Olster (University of Kentucky)
Title: The Idolatry of the Jews and the Anti-Judaizing Roots of Seventh- and Early Eighth-Century Iconoclasm

Associate Professor Jitse Dijkstra (University of Ottawa)
Title: The Avenging Sword? Imperial Legislation Against Temples in the Fourth and Fifth Centuries

For full details and registration, see http://events.mq.edu.au/AABS20

Call for Papers: Biblical Poetry: the Legacy of the Psalms in Late Antiquity and Byzantium

Ghent University, Belgiumm, 23-24 April 2020

Deadline: 31 May 2019

The Psalms, in their Greek Septuagint translation, were a fundamental corpus of biblical poetry, and as such were continuously referred to in Christian literature. They played a key role in the daily life and in the development of religious sensitivity of late antique and Byzantine people. The production of Psalm-related literature, notably exegetic, was impressively widespread. The Psalms, however, influenced other genres of religious literature as well, and their poetical nature remained an important feature that later authors were well aware of.

In preparation of a volume on the reception of the Psalms in poetry from Late Antiquity and Byzantium, we invite scholars of all levels of experience to present a paper at a colloquium on this subject.

Confirmed speakers are Andrew Faulkner, Antonia Giannouli, Christian Høgel and Maria Ypsilanti.

We welcome contributions on the following topics especially:
• the appreciation of the Psalter’s poetical nature in exegesis and in the biblical manuscript tradition (e.g. recognition, by patristic and Byzantine exegetes, of the presence or absence of poetical features);
• rhetorical aspects of the Psalms as highlighted in late antique and Byzantine treatises;
• the influence of the Psalms on Byzantine poetry (e.g. what was their role in the composition of eis heauton poems? How does self-expression in Christian poetry relate to the Psalms?);
• the reception of the Psalms in hymnographic poetry;
• the reception of the Psalter in specific genres of poetry, such as Byzantine catanyctic poetry;
• the metrical metaphrases by ps-Apollinaris and Manuel Philes;
• metrical paratexts on the Psalms.

These examples are not exclusive and papers on other related topics are welcome.

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers. Each paper will be followed by a reaction from a respondent, who will open the discussion with the audience. Contributors whose abstract is accepted will be asked to submit prior to the colloquium a rough draft of their full text. After the conference, they are expected to offer their re-worked paper for inclusion (upon acceptance after peer-review) in a volume on the reception of the Psalms in Byzantine poetry.

Please send a title and a short abstract (max. 300 words) of your paper to rachele.ricceri@ugent.be no later than May 31, 2019. Accepted speakers will be notified by the end of June 2019.

For more information, please visit our website.

Organisers: Floris Bernard, Reinhart Ceulemans, Cristina Cocola, Kristoffel Demoen, Anna Gioffreda, Andreas Rhoby, Rachele Ricceri.

This colloquium is organised within the framework of the projects David, our Orpheus. Reception, Rewritings and Adaptations of the Psalms in Byzantine Poetry (funded by the FWO – Flemish Research Foundation) and The Legacy of the Psalms in Byzantine Poetry: Book Epigrams and Metrical Paraphrases (funded by the FWO – Flemish Research Foundation and the FWF – Austrian Science Fund), which are being carried out at Ghent University, KU Leuven and the Austrian Academy of Sciences.

Conference: Polities of Faith: Theology, Ecclesiology, and Spatiality in the Christian World

Institute of Classical Studies 2019 Byzantine Colloquium

Room 349/350, Senate House, University of London, 4-5 June 2019

Deadline: 15 May 2019

In 1932 Olof Linton’s dissertation Das Problem der Urkirche in der neueren Forschung overturned the existing consensus that presented the Church as a historical construct that followed the triumph of Christianity. According to Linton, the Church already existed in the minds of the earliest Christian thinkers, who had envisaged a structured community of believers and clerics. More recently, sociologists have similarly responded to previous approaches focused on the efficiency of institutions by emphasizing the key role that intellectual legitimisation plays in the survival of organisational structures. While Late Antique and Medieval historians have underlined the importance of discourse and ritual in the construction of a Christian world-view, there is still much work to be done in assessing how theological and ecclesiological discussions shaped the structure, organisation and on-going development of the Christian Churches. The Colloquium explores this theme bringing together classicists, historians and theologians working on the construction of the Christian Churches from Late Antiquity to the thirteenth century, and beyond:

· James Corke-Webster (London), The Church in Eusebius’ Life of Constantine
· Anthony Dupont (Louvain), Keeping the Church in the middle. Augustine of Hippo’s interrelated theoretical and practical ecclesiology
· Tom Hunt (Birmingham), The Influence of Trinitarian Theology on Jerome’s Hierarchical Ecclesiology in Against Jovinian and Letter 52
· Andrew Jotischky (London), Knowledge, Mediation and Tradition in Thirteenth Century Pilgrimage in the Eastern Mediterranean
· Chrysovalantis Kyriacou (Nicosia), Of monks and bishops: Cypriot clerical networks and the circle of Maximus the Confessor
· Ioannis Papadogiannakis (London), The Body Politic in 6th-7th Byzantium: Religious, Social and Political Implications
· Richard Price (London), One Empire, One Church

For the programme of the Colloquium please click here.

For information and to reserve a place please contact Sapfo.Psani@rhul.ac.uk by 15 May 2019.

Call for Papers: Family Matters

The 5th Annual Conference of the Late Antique and Medieval Postgraduate Society at the University of Edinburgh, Saturday, 15 June 2019

Deadline: 5 April 2019

The Late Antique and Medieval Postgraduate Society (LAMPS) at the University of Edinburgh is hosting a one-day conference on the theme of Family Matters in literature and historical sources from the Late Antique to the start of the Early Modern period. This conference seeks to further our understanding of the roles, values, religious ideals, practices and dynamics of the family during the Late Antique and Medieval periods. It invites us to explore how families, whether aristocratic or not, functioned. It also aims to strengthen interdisciplinary connections within and outside of the University of Edinburgh, including but not limited to the fields of Archaeology, History, Classics, History of Art, Literature, Language Studies, Islamic Studies, and Theology. We welcome submissions for papers on the theme of Family Matters and hope to engage with a wider audience by providing a forum for postgraduate and early career scholars to present their research. Submissions for abstracts may include, but are certainly not limited to:

● Family as portrayed in literature
● Gender roles
● Children and childhood
● The function of religion within everyday life
● Parenthood
● Home and work
● Religious, legal and social issues within the home
● Family and the community
● Monastic families
● Mortality

Early career scholars and postgraduate students are invited to submit abstracts of up to 200 words, as well as a short biography of up to 100 words to lampsedinburgh@gmail.com by Friday, 5 April, 2019

Lecture: Dropping a Medieval Chronicle (and Putting it Back Together): Reading the Byzantine Chronography of Theophanes and George the Synkellos through Manuscripts, Maps, and Text Analysis

Harvard Faculty Club, 20 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA, USA, 6:15-7:45pm, 28 March 2019

The co-authored early ninth-century Constantinopolitan Chronography of George the Synkellos and Theophanes the Confessor was a much more daring intellectual project than has been conceded. Opening up the Chronography’s complexity invites both the re-deployment of established methods such as close readings and codicological studies, as well as new “digital” approaches such as text analysis and mapping.

This talk will argue that these approaches are not mutually exclusive but both complementary and game-changing for historicized readings of medieval historical texts in general. After outlining an ecumenical approach to the Chronography in particular, I will propose other applications. Beyond a coup for Byzantinsts these methods can rejuvenate study of medieval chronicles in general: they supply a method for rigorous comparative reading and contribute to contemporary debates over historical space and periodization.

Full details at: https://maryjahariscenter.org/events/dropping-a-medieval-chronicle-and-putting-it-back-together