Call for Papers: Byzantium – Bridge Between Worlds: 24th International Congress of Byzantine Studies

Istanbul, Turkey, 23-28 August 2021

Deadline: 15 April 2020

Due to its remarkably long duration, territorial expanse, geographical situation and complex cultural traditions, Byzantium acted as a temporal and spatial bridge connecting different periods, geographical areas, and cultures. Byzantium acted as a transition between ancient, medieval and early modern worlds around the Mediterranean basin, Eurasia and the Near East through reception, appropriation, and innovation. It connected different geographical and cultural spaces through political, economic, material, and cultural networks in many of which it constituted an important node. Centering on the key theme of “Byzantium – Bridge between Worlds,” the 24th International Congress of Byzantine Studies aims to explore this connecting and mediatory role of Byzantium. It also hopes to initiate proposals on bridging interdisciplinary gaps within Byzantine studies and strengthening dialogue with other with other relevant fields.

The Call for Free Communication, Poster and VR Sessions is now open.

The last submission date is 15 April 2020. Each abstract must be no longer than 300 words. Abstracts should be in the same language as that of the paper to be presented during the session. The working languages of the Congress are English, French, German, Greek, Italian, Russian and Turkish. The participants shall present papers of no longer than 15 minutes each.

Conveners and speakers can participate in no more than 2 sessions during the Congress (including round tables, poster/VR sessions, and thematic free communication/free communication sessions, but excluding plenary sessions).

To submit an abstract, see here.

The abstracts will be included in the program only after the registration payment. 3 April 2021 is the last date for registration payment. For registration please follow this link.

Course: Crash-course in Greek Paleography

Ghent University, Belgium, 3-4 February 2020

Deadline: 15 January 2020

The Greek department of Ghent University offers a two-day course in Greek paleography in collaboration with the Research School OIKOS. The course is intended for (advanced) students and PhDs in Classics, Ancient History and Ancient Civilizations with a good command of Greek. It offers an intensive introduction into Greek paleography from the Hellenistic period until the end of the Middle Ages and is specifically aimed at acquiring practical skills to read literary and documentary papyri and literary manuscripts from the originals.

Six lectures will give a chronological overview of the development of Greek handwriting, each followed by a practice session reading relevant extracts from papyri and manuscripts in smaller groups under supervision. The first day (Monday) will focus on documentary and literary papyri and we will be working with original papyri from the papyrus collection of the Ghent University Library. The second day (Tuesday) we will continue with literary manuscripts.

The study load is the equivalent of 2 ECTS (2×28 hours). Participants will be asked to read up on secondary literature in preparation for the seminar, see below. Extra material will be handed out during the course in order to continue to practice and improve your reading skills after the course.

Dinner (Monday) and lunch (Tuesday) will be provided. Travel costs and/or accommodation are at your own expense.

For registration and further questions contact Joanne Stolk (joanne.stolk@ugent.be)

Grant: Andrew W. Mellon Short-Term Postdoctoral Research Grant in Byzantine Studies

Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey

Deadline: 15 January 2020

The Byzantine Studies Research Center at Bogazici University is pleased to announce one short-term postdoctoral research grant in the field of Byzantine studies for Turkish citizens and foreign scholars holding academic positions in Turkey. The aim of the grant is to sponsor the expenses of the successful candidate for travel within or outside Turkey for research in 2020. Funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the grant offers up to $2,500 for the abovementioned expenses to be spent in 2020.

Candidates with a PhD degree in Byzantine studies should submit their application to the Byzantine Studies Research Center at Bogazici University before 15 January 2020. The application file should be in English and include a research project proposal with a time line (up to 1,000 words), an expected budget for expenses, a CV and list of publications, a sample of written work, and two letters of recommendation.

For full details, see http://byzantinestudies.boun.edu.tr/index.php?page=events&id=47

Scholarship: Two Fully-funded PhD Scholarships in Liturgical Studies, University of Notre Dame

University of Notre Dame, IN, USA

Deadline: 2 January 2020

The Graduate School at the University of Notre Dame accepts up to two, fully-funded PhD students per year in Liturgical Studies. The program in Liturgical Studies integrates three sub-disciplines: Liturgical History; Liturgical Theology; Ritual Studies.

The program offers a wide range of research opportunities with particular strengths in early and late antique Christian ritual and material culture, medieval liturgy, Byzantine Christianity, manuscript studies, contemporary liturgical theology, and ritual studies. Recent dissertations have included topics on ritual at the Second Temple, architecture and liturgy in medieval Salisbury, liturgy and life in Crusader Jerusalem, ritual in Igbo culture, imperial rites for commemorating earthquakes in late antique Constantinople, and liturgy and identity in the California Missions.

The Liturgical Studies program was founded in 1947 as the first graduate program in the Department of Theology and quickly grew to become an international center for the study of liturgy. Pioneers in the discipline who have taught at Notre Dame include Josef Jungmann, Louis Bouyer, Robert Taft, Paul Bradshaw, and many others. The program is currently comprised of seven faculty members and represents one of the largest concentrations of liturgical scholars at one place in the world.

In addition to its core strengths, Liturgical Studies offers a variety of opportunities for research collaboration with other institutions at Notre Dame, including the Medieval Institute, the Program in Sacred Music, other departments at the university (esp. History, Anthropology and Sociology) and other programs within the Theology Department, including Christianity and Judaism in Antiquity (CJA), the History of Christianity (HC), and Systematic Theology (ST). The Hesburgh Libraries system has extensive holdings in theology and one of the nation’s largest collections in medieval and Byzantine studies, including the Milton Anastos Collection. The Theology Department also offers a broad range of ancient languages, including courses in Greek, Latin, Syriac, Hebrew, Coptic, Armenian and Ge’ez, with additional opportunities for studying Georgian, Slavonic, and Jewish Aramaic.

All applications must be submitted to the Graduate School by January 2, 2020. More information and a link to the online application may be found at https://theology.nd.edu/graduate-programs/ph-d/.

Conference: Byzantine Missions: Meaning, Nature, and Extent

Dumbarton Oaks, Washington D.C., USA, 24-25 April 2020

Though closely connected with the study of conversion and Christianization in the premodern era, the history of Christian missions has received little attention in recent scholarship. The recipients of Christian faith—individuals, nations, or social groups—and the processes of integrating the new religion have continued to attract analysis, but the agents of religious transformation have been relatively understudied, especially beyond the boundaries of medieval western Europe.

The symposium aims to illumine the inner motifs that characterized Byzantine missions, the changing incentives that inspired their missionizing, and the nature of their missionary activity; and ultimately to better understand how they perceived the universal claim of their empire and their church. At the same time, we hope to throw light on the broader religious dynamics of the medieval world.

Symposiarchs: Sergey Ivanov (National Research University, Higher School of Economics, Moscow) and Andrea Sterk (University of Minnesota)

For details, see https://www.doaks.org/research/byzantine/scholarly-activities/byzantine-missions-meaning-nature-and-extent

Seminar Series: KCL CHS Late Antique & Byzantine Seminar Series

Centre for Hellenic Studies, King’s College London, Strand Campus, London, October 2019-March 2020

22 October 2019, 18:00 to 20:00
Dimitris Kountouras (Athens) – Music and poetry of the Troubadours at the Latin Kingdom of Thessalonica after 1204

12 November 2019, 18:00 to 20:00
Panayiotis Panayides (Oxford) – The life histories of statues in the public baths of Salamis, Cyprus

26 November 2019, 18:00 to 20:00
Corisande Fenwick (UCL) – Building God’s Empire: Archaeology, religion and the Byzantine conquest of Africa

21 January 2020, 17:30 to 19:00
Elisabeth R. O’Connell (British Museum) – ‘For the great agape now practiced towards the poor who come to the holy monastery …’: (P.KRU 106): Care for the poor in Late Antique Egypt

11 February 2020, 17:30 to 19:00
Dionysios Stathakopoulos (KCL) – How to get (and stay) rich in the late Byzantine world

3 March 2020, 17:30 to 19:00
Marija Vukovojac (SPBS) – Stefan Nemanja, holy ruler or ruthless warrior?

17 March 2020, 17:30 to 19:00
Petros Bouras-Vallianatos (Edinburgh) – Diagnosing and Treating Disease in Byzantine Hospitals

Online Resource: North of Byzantium: Medieval Art, Architecture and Visual Culture in Eastern Europe

North of Byzantium (NoB) is a new initiative organized by Maria Alessia Rossi (The Index of Medieval Art) and Alice Isabella Sullivan (Getty/ACLS), and primarily sponsored by the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture. Through its annual events, NoB explores the rich history, art, and culture of the northern frontiers of the Byzantine Empire in Eastern Europe between the thirteenth and sixteenth centuries, and aims to connect students, scholars, teachers, artists, and curators to resources related to the medieval and early modern artistic production of Eastern Europe.

Visit the NoB website and subscribe to receive news and updates.

We are in the process of developing this platform and we would be grateful for any further details and relevant information that we could add under “Resources” and “Related Events” – send us a note at northofbyzantium@gmail.com.