Conference: Self-Representation in Late Antiquity and Byzantium

26-28 February 2021

Regisration is now open for the 23rd International Graduate Conference of the Oxford University Byzantine Society, which will take place online (via Zoom). Further details can be found on the OUBS website, including a full programme.

We hope to allow more people than ever before to join our event, and therefore the OUBS will not be charging graduate students to participate in the conference. However, for other participants we are suggesting a donation, which will be used by the OUBS to support graduate students in the future.

Oxford Byzantine Graduate Seminar

The Oxford Byzantine Graduate Seminar is a new initiative sponsored by Oxford Medieval Studies (TORCH) and Worcester College, Oxford. It is designed to showcase the breadth of graduate research in modern Late Antique and Byzantine Studies and to foster academic collaboration across institutions and sub-disciplines.

The Seminar will take place weekly on Mondays at 12.30-14.00 (GMT) via Zoom. The speaker will present for 40-45 minutes, followed by audience questions and discussion.

To register and for further information, please contact the organiser at james.cogbill@worc.ox.ac.uk. Proposals by current graduate students for future sessions are very welcome.

Schedule

25th January: Chloé Agar (St. Cross College, Oxford)
Analysing Visions Experienced by Saints and Supplicants in Coptic Sources: What, How, and Why?

1st February: Alberto Ravani (Exeter College, Oxford)
A Byzantine story of Allegory as told by John Tzetzes

8th February: Flavia Vanni (University of Birmingham)
Discussing Byzantine stucco decoration (850-1453): people and materials

15th February: Rachael Helen Banes (University of Birmingham)
Set in Stone: Commemoration in Graffiti in the Late Antique East c. 300-700 CE

22nd February: Stephanie Novasio (University of Birmingham)
The Byzantine life course (exact title TBC)

1st March: Ewan Short (Cardiff University)
How can we identify imperial women in Byzantine sources? Some methodological proposals

8th March: Paul Ulishney (Christ Church, Oxford)
Anti-Jewish Polemic in Anastasius of Sinai’s Hexaemeron

15th March: Giulia Maria Paoletti (Exeter College, Oxford)
Manasses or not Manasses? Paraenetic poetry in Late Byzantium

First Online Edinburgh Byzantine Book Festival

The Edinburgh Byzantine Book Festival is the first of its kind as a way to learn about recently published books on any area of Late Antique and Byzantine Studies (AD ca.300–ca.1500), including literature, history, archaeology, and material culture. The Festival is an online event, allowing attendees from all over the world to join in. The aim is to hold it every two years in order to promote a wider understanding and awareness of Byzantine scholarship in a spirit of collegiality. It is also intended to encourage future collaborations and networking among the various presenters and attendees, especially in these strange times of the coronavirus pandemic. Hopefully, it will also inspire similar events in other research fields in the future.

The 1st Online Edinburgh Byzantine Book Festival includes volumes published in 2019 and 2020, and forthcoming books with an estimated publication date no later than June 2021. It features monographs published in English, French, Georgian, German, Modern Greek, Italian, and Romanian.

The programme is now available online.

*FREE* WEBINAR VIA Blackboard Collaborate

Register online now at:
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/136623981005/

Update: SPBS Spring Lecture postponed

The SPBS is sorry to announce that its Spring Lecture – ‘The fortifications of Byzantine and Crusader Cyprus’, by Dr James Petre – will be postponed indefinitely owing to ongoing measures against the spread of COVID-19. The lecture was due to take place on 31 March in Senate House, London. We intend to reschedule the event at a later date when public gatherings become more practicable. In the meantime, please stay well!

The 53rd Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies

University of Birmingham, 28-30 March 2020

Nature and the environment underpinned Byzantine life but have been little studied. How the Byzantines responded to, interacted with and understood the landscape, however, enables crucial new insights into East Roman perceptions of the world. Modern interest in the environment and eco-history makes this theme pertinent and timely. Current research on climate change and how it affected the East Mediterranean creates new paradigms for our understanding of Byzantine interactions with the environment. The 53rd Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies draws together Byzantine literary and visual responses to nature and the environment as well as showcasing the most recent scientific research on historical climate change and environmental management in Byzantium.

This symposium was planned by Dr Ruth Macrides (University of Birmingham) and will be dedicated to her memory. The first two sessions of the symposium will consist of tributes to Ruth’s life and career by her former students and colleagues.

The Symposium will be followed, on Monday afternoon (30 March), by the second in what is planned as a regular series of professional development workshops targeted at Byzantine postgraduate students and sponsored by the SPBS. The workshop, Climate, environment and history, is intended to help early career academics in the humanities familiarize themselves with some of the key aspects of studying the way past human societies have interacted with their physical and climatic environments. Presenters will explain key methodological and interpretational issues and discuss how to avoid misunderstanding or misusing palaeoenvironmental and palaeoclimatic research results.

Information about registration, accommodation and communications will be released in November 2019.

https://www.byzantium.ac.uk/the-53rd-spring-symposium-of-byzantine-studies/