Call for Papers: Waste Not Want Not: Food And Thrift From Antiquity To The Present

Faculty of English, University of Cambridge, 12-13 September 2019

Deadline: 31 May 2019

The Cambridge Body and Food Histories group is delighted to announce the call for papers for its second annual conference. This day-and-a-half conference will bring together academics and professionals working within the interdisciplinary fields of food studies and food sustainability research, to reflect on past and present attitudes towards food preservation and waste. Part of an ongoing historiographical effort to better understand consuming behaviours through time, the conference aims to open up a dialogue between historians and policy makers. Using both past and present as critical lenses, the event will serve as a platform for the discussion of more sustainable food practice in the present and future.

Keynote addresses will be delivered by Dr Amanda Herbert (Folger Institute, Washington), and Dr Simon Werrett (UCL).

Please see the full details below or on our website.

We invite proposals for 20 minute papers from researchers in any discipline and at any stage in their career working on FOOD WASTE AND/OR FOOD SUSTAINABILITY practices in any period of history.

Abstracts of 300 words max. should be emailed to foodandthrift@yahoo.com by the deadline 31st May 2019.

Themes may include, but are not limited to:
– Food preservation – methods and implements for preserving food; the temporalities of food itself (seasonality, the potential for decay)
– Management of food waste – methods and implements for disposing of or reusing food waste
– Spaces of food preservation and waste – the factory, workplace, home etc.
– Historical issues of food insecurity and food inequality – economic reasons for ‘thrift’ and their relationship to class/wealth
– Food waste as a moral/religious/political issue – the wider (cultural) frameworks within which food waste/’thrift’ has been understood
– Questions of memory and time – the role of food waste/’thrift’ in visions of the (utopian/ dystopian) future; tendencies to characterise particular periods as excessive or frugal; the impact of these visions on the present

This conference is designed to generate an interdisciplinary discussion between scholars from a wide variety of fields: archaeology, history, geography, anthropology, and sociology, among others. The conference will also feature a roundtable discussion with representatives from the third sector.

Any questions should be sent direct to foodandthrift@yahoo.com

This conference is generously funded by The University of Cambridge AHRC DTP

Call for Papers: Historical Inertia: Continuity in the Face of Change 500-1500 CE

3rd Annual Edinburgh International Graduate Conference in Late Antique, Islamic and Byzantine Studies

Deadline: 3 June 2019

Historical discourse has long concerned itself with patterns of change and discontinuity to demonstrate and validate models of periodisation and the compartmentalisation of the wider historical field. Building on these themes, this conference has chosen to focus on the opposing view by concentrating on inertia – how history, material culture, ideas and communities can be seen to maintain a stayed course or deviate if a significant force is exerted upon it. Inertia, a concept that has yet to be applied to mainstream Late Antique studies, introduces perspectives and frameworks that permit new approaches to traditional processes.

This conference will be hosted by the Late Antique, Islamic and Byzantine Society of the University of Edinburgh on the 22 – 23 November 2019 and will tackle the notion of inertia and the implications accompanying it for Late Antique, Islamic and Byzantine history from 500-1500 CE.

We particularly encourage contributions on the following topics:
• Dynastic and Political Changes: Patterns of continuity across ruling classes, court-life and dynastic succession.
• A View from Below – Story of the Common Masses: The role of perceived ‘minority’ groups (religious, ethnic or cultural) that constituted the numerical majority of the population but are ignored or omitted in sources written for/by the dominant group.
• Patterns of Trade and Economic Infrastructure: ‘domestic or foreign’.
• Forms of Expression and Transmission: Listening through language, art and ideas.
• Frontiers (and beyond): Military, diplomatic or cultural interactions across linguistic and political delimitations.

We strongly encourage papers from postgraduate students and early career researchers from all disciplines (Archaeology, Art History, History, Theology etc.) which take advantage of interdisciplinary source-critical approaches.

Poster Presentations:
There will be a special poster session held during the conference of 1 hour, which will take place on Saturday afternoon, allowing for discussion with the authors. The posters will be left up for the duration of the conference so they can also be visited during the breaks and during the reception.

We strongly encourage submissions from undergraduate as well as graduate students. The poster size cannot exceed 70cm (width) x 100cm (height)

Deadlines:
Deadline for abstracts is the 3rd of June and notification of acceptance will be confirmed by mid-June. Please submit your abstract of no more than 300 words, and a 100-word professional biography to edibyzpg@ed.ac.uk. Please indicate on your abstract if you are submitting for poster or paper. We kindly welcome submissions from individuals or groups. There will be a small registration fee of £15 and lunch will be provided on both days. We will aim to publish a selection of the papers in a peer-reviewed volume that will bring together the strongest contributions in each area to produce an edited volume of high-quality, deep coherence and rich variety.

The organising committee, P. Harrison, A. Nayfa, S. Nwokoro, L. Pecorini and A. Stockhammer.

Scholarship: Connected Clerics: Building a Universal Church in the Late Antique West (380-604 CE)

Royal Holloway, University of London

Deadline: 17 May 2019

Applications are invited for two 3-year PhD studentships grant-funded by the ERC project “Connected Clerics: Building a Universal Church in the Late Antique West (380-604 CE)” [CONNEC].

This project focuses on analysing clerical discourses, conflicts, and laws that contributed to maintaining a relatively cohesive late antique western church despite the fragmentation of the Roman empire and its substitution by smaller kingdoms. The successful candidate will have a chance to acquire expertise in social network analysis and other techniques of digital humanities.

Applications are invited which propose an individual research project involving Latin sources in one of the following two areas:
•Theological and ecclesiological debates concerning the nature of the church as an emerging institution
•Debates over ecclesiastical policy and its implementation

The studentship will run for three years from September 2019 and your annual stipend (non-taxable) will be £13,500 plus fees. An allowance of £2000 per year is also available for additional training, travel, and conference fees. You will also have the possibility to conduct a research stay at an overseas institution. The studentship is open to students of all nationalities.

Queries may be directed to the Principal Investigator, David.Natal@rhul.ac.uk.

Applications (including a cover letter, c.v., 800-word research proposal, and the name of two referees) should be submitted by 5 p.m. Greenwich Mean Time on 17 May 2019 to Royal Holloway.

For further details see https://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BRH184/phd-scholarship-connected-clerics-building-a-universal-church-in-the-late-antique-west-380-604-ce

Job: Career Development Fellow in Classics

University of Edinburgh

Deadline: 3 April 2019

The School of History, Classics and Archaeology at the University of Edinburgh seeks to appoint a Career Development Fellow in Classics for one year from 1 September 2019. The Department’s coverage includes Greek and Latin language, literature, and philosophy; ancient history; classical art and archaeology; Byzantine studies, post-Classical Latin, and the classical tradition/ history of reception. Applicants in any of these fields are welcome. The appointee will devote most of their time to the completion of a programme of research, but will also gain experience in research-led teaching and large-scale lecturing and will organise a symposium in the area of their interests. Candidates will normally have obtained their PhD since 31 December 2017.

Salary: UE07 £33,199 to £39,609 per annum.

Closing date: 5pm (GMT) 3rd April 2019.

For details, see https://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BQR449/career-development-fellow-in-classics

Conference: Polities of Faith: Theology, Ecclesiology, and Spatiality in the Christian World

Institute of Classical Studies 2019 Byzantine Colloquium

Room 349/350, Senate House, University of London, 4-5 June 2019

Deadline: 15 May 2019

In 1932 Olof Linton’s dissertation Das Problem der Urkirche in der neueren Forschung overturned the existing consensus that presented the Church as a historical construct that followed the triumph of Christianity. According to Linton, the Church already existed in the minds of the earliest Christian thinkers, who had envisaged a structured community of believers and clerics. More recently, sociologists have similarly responded to previous approaches focused on the efficiency of institutions by emphasizing the key role that intellectual legitimisation plays in the survival of organisational structures. While Late Antique and Medieval historians have underlined the importance of discourse and ritual in the construction of a Christian world-view, there is still much work to be done in assessing how theological and ecclesiological discussions shaped the structure, organisation and on-going development of the Christian Churches. The Colloquium explores this theme bringing together classicists, historians and theologians working on the construction of the Christian Churches from Late Antiquity to the thirteenth century, and beyond:

· James Corke-Webster (London), The Church in Eusebius’ Life of Constantine
· Anthony Dupont (Louvain), Keeping the Church in the middle. Augustine of Hippo’s interrelated theoretical and practical ecclesiology
· Tom Hunt (Birmingham), The Influence of Trinitarian Theology on Jerome’s Hierarchical Ecclesiology in Against Jovinian and Letter 52
· Andrew Jotischky (London), Knowledge, Mediation and Tradition in Thirteenth Century Pilgrimage in the Eastern Mediterranean
· Chrysovalantis Kyriacou (Nicosia), Of monks and bishops: Cypriot clerical networks and the circle of Maximus the Confessor
· Ioannis Papadogiannakis (London), The Body Politic in 6th-7th Byzantium: Religious, Social and Political Implications
· Richard Price (London), One Empire, One Church

For the programme of the Colloquium please click here.

For information and to reserve a place please contact Sapfo.Psani@rhul.ac.uk by 15 May 2019.

Call for Papers: Family Matters

The 5th Annual Conference of the Late Antique and Medieval Postgraduate Society at the University of Edinburgh, Saturday, 15 June 2019

Deadline: 5 April 2019

The Late Antique and Medieval Postgraduate Society (LAMPS) at the University of Edinburgh is hosting a one-day conference on the theme of Family Matters in literature and historical sources from the Late Antique to the start of the Early Modern period. This conference seeks to further our understanding of the roles, values, religious ideals, practices and dynamics of the family during the Late Antique and Medieval periods. It invites us to explore how families, whether aristocratic or not, functioned. It also aims to strengthen interdisciplinary connections within and outside of the University of Edinburgh, including but not limited to the fields of Archaeology, History, Classics, History of Art, Literature, Language Studies, Islamic Studies, and Theology. We welcome submissions for papers on the theme of Family Matters and hope to engage with a wider audience by providing a forum for postgraduate and early career scholars to present their research. Submissions for abstracts may include, but are certainly not limited to:

● Family as portrayed in literature
● Gender roles
● Children and childhood
● The function of religion within everyday life
● Parenthood
● Home and work
● Religious, legal and social issues within the home
● Family and the community
● Monastic families
● Mortality

Early career scholars and postgraduate students are invited to submit abstracts of up to 200 words, as well as a short biography of up to 100 words to lampsedinburgh@gmail.com by Friday, 5 April, 2019

Grant: The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation : Venetian Research programme grants

Deadline: 1 May 2019

Venetian Resesarch Programme: British and Commonwealth Applicants.

The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation – British and Commonwealth Committee – announces its 2019-20 programme of grants for study based on travel to and research in Venice and the Venetian dominions.

Grants will be awarded for historical research on Venice and the former Venetian empires, and for the study of contemporary Venetian society and culture. Applicants from all disciplines of the humanities are eligible for areas of study including, but not limited to: archaeology, architecture, art; bibliography; economics; history; history of science; law; literature; music; political thought; religion theatre, film and television. Applications for research on the environment and conservation are welcomed. Other, relevant, research interests will be considered.

For details, see https://royalhistsoc.org/the-gladys-krieble-delmas-foundation-venetian-research-programme-grants/

Call for Papers: Celebrations in the eastern Mediterranean: private and public

Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies, University of Birmingham, 1 June 2019

Deadline: 7 April 2019

We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers in celebration of the 20th Postgraduate Colloquium of the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies at the University of Birmingham,UK.

Papers and posters are invited for the 20th Annual Postgraduate Colloquium at the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies. From antiquity to the present peoples in the eastern Mediterranean have taken part in celebrations and ceremonies. These vary from large-scale public events to private and personal rituals. As we continue to take part in social rituals derived from these traditions and develop new ways to manifest them it is important to examine these celebrations in detail. The colloquium aims to approach the subject from a variety of perspectives on how people experience celebrations across the eastern Mediterranean from late antiquity to the modern day, from textual sources to visual culture and archaeology.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:
– Feast days and holidays
– Processions
– Secular and religious ceremonies
– Gift Giving
– Secular and religious ceremonies
– Festivals
– Anniversaries, holidays, weddings
– Spaces and Objects
– Celebrations in texts and arts

Papers of approximately 20 minutes or posters (A3 format) related to any of the fields covered by Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies are welcome. Please submit abstracts of no more than 250 words no later than the Sunday 7th April 2019 to 2019CBOMGSColloquium@gmail.com. A selection of papers will be published in the proceedings on the online journal Diogenes (https://gemuob.wordpress.com/diogenes/)

Further information can be found on the conference webpage: https://gemuob.wordpress.com/annual-colloquium-3/

Come and celebrate with us!

Seminar series: UoL Working Seminar on Editing Byzantine Texts

Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, University of London, 1 February-29 March 2019

The University of London Working Seminar on Editing Byzantine Texts continues its work preparing a new annotated edition and translation of the lengthy Correspondence of George of Cyprus (Ecumenical Patriarch Gregory II, 1283-89). Scholars and graduate students from University of London Colleges, other Colleges and Universities, and visiting students and academics interested in Byzantine texts, are most welcome to participate. The Seminar is meeting at the Institute of Historical Research, Pollard Room (N301), Senate House, University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E in February and March 2019 on Fridays 15:00-17:00, starting from 1 February 2019. To celebrate the 35th Anniversary of the Seminar (1984-2019) a special reunion of old and current members will be held at Royal Holloway, University of London, 11 Bedford Square, Bedford Room, London WC1B 3RF on 29 March 2019 at 6pm. For further information please contact Ch.Dendrinos@rhul.ac.uk and Christopher.Wright@rhul.ac.uk