London International Palaeography Summer School

Institute of English Studies, University of London, 8-12 June 2020

Deadline: 31 January 2020

The London International Palaeography Summer School (LIPSS) at the Institute of English Studies, University of London is now accepting applications for its summer programme. Running from 8th-12th June 2020, LIPSS is a series of intensive courses in Palaeography and Manuscript Studies.

Courses range from a half to two days duration and are given by experts in their respective fields from a wide range of institutions. Subject areas include Latin, Anglo-Saxon, Middle English, Early Modern English, German and Greek palaeography, illuminated manuscripts, codicology, manuscript editing and liturgical and devotional manuscripts.

Course fees range from £45 (Half Day, Student) to £400 (Five Days, Student) and £50 (Half Day Standard) to £450 (Five Days, Student). Applications are accepted on a rolling basis until a course is full. There are a limited number of one-day bursaries available to apply for until 31st January 2020.

Please see the full list of 2020 courses and tutors below. Courses fees range from Half-Day fees of £50 (standard) and £45 (student), to Five-Day fees of £450 (standard) and £400 (student). The full breakdown of fees can be found here.

Further information about the LIPSS can be found on the School’s homepage or through the link https://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/lipss. Questions can be directed to iesevents@sas.ac.uk.

Summer School: Classical and Byzantine Greek Summer School

University of Birmingham, 12 July-8 August 2020

Deadline: 29 May 2020

The Department of Classics and the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies of the University of Birmingham are delighted to announce The Classical and Byzantine Greek Summer School, which will take place from 12 July to 8 August 2020. This Summer School offers participants the opportunity to study either Classical or Byzantine/Medieval Greek at all levels (beginners, intermediate, advanced).

The courses will take place on the beautiful Edgbaston Campus, and affordable accommodation is available within walking distance. The course is aimed at Undergraduate and Postgraduate students, and at teachers who wish to learn Ancient Greek or improve existing skills. As well as intensive tuition over up to four weeks, the summer school offers a range of workshops and evening lectures, and opportunities to work with the outstanding collections of ancient artefacts and coins housed in the Archaeology Museum, and at the Barber Institute of Fine Arts.

The deadline for applications is 29 May 2020. For more details on the application process and the Summer School in general, please see: https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/schools/historycultures/departments/caha/events/2020/bomgs-summer-school.aspx. For further enquiries, please contact Dr Theofili Kampianaki at: T.Kampianaki@bham.ac.uk.

Fellowship: Donald Bullough Fellowship 2020-2021

University of St Andrews

Deadline: 15 January 2020

The Department of Mediaeval History at the University of St Andrews invites applications for the Donald Bullough Fellowship, to be taken up during either semester of the academic year 2020-2021.

The Fellowship is open to any academic in a permanent university post with research interests in mediaeval history. The financial aspect of the fellowship is a subsidy (up to £3000) towards the cost of travel to St Andrews and accommodation during your stay. The successful applicant is normally someone enjoying research leave from their own institution. Previous Fellows have included Dr Christina Pössel, Professor Cynthia Neville, Dr Ross Balzaretti, Dr Marlene Hennessy, Professor Warren Brown, Dr Edward Coleman, Professor Richard Kaeuper, Dr Natasha Hodgson, Professor Jacqueline Murray, Professor Ruth Mazo Karras, and Professor Cullen Chandler. The fellowship is currently held by Professor Dan Smail (Autumn-Winter Semester 2019).

For full details, see https://saims.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/2019/10/07/apply-for-the-2020-2021-bullough-fellowship/.

Scholarship: Fully-funded PhD Scholarship in Classics and Late Antique History

University of St Andrews

Deadline: 16 January 2020

The University of St Andrews is pleased to offer a full scholarship funded by St Leonard’s Postgraduate College, to support an exceptional student undertaking doctoral research in the following project: ‘Remembering the Dead on the Edge of Empire: Epitaphs and Social Change in Late Antique Italy (300-600 CE)’

This project will examine the transformations of north Italian society between 300 and 600 CE, analysing key developments in the relationship between memory, identity, and social power. Focusing on funerary inscriptions as part of the strategies for social promotion used by inhabitants of Italian cities – including both migrant and ‘indigenous’ groups – it will examine their contribution to the redefinition of the communities in which they lived. The resulting thesis will provide an original picture of late antique Italy, giving voice to new and often neglected social groups and identities. It will also focus directly on a relatively neglected, yet crucially important, set of Late Antique data – inscribed epitaphs. Scholars have recently paid great attention to funerary rites as a means of establishing social standing within a community. Our proposed project goes one step further, focusing on how this activity continued beyond death and burial – through the medium of inscribing words on stone. In doing this, it will represent an innovative and ground-breaking study in late antique studies, whether in terms of its interdisciplinary methodology, approach, and results.

For full information, see https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/fees-and-funding/postgraduate/scholarships/world-leading-classics-history/.

Fellowship: JRF in the History and Culture of the Countries of the Silk Roads

King’s College, London, 2020-2024

Deadline: 14 January 2020

Through a generous donation, King’s College Cambridge is able to invite applications for a four-year Junior Research Fellowship from those who are completing or have recently completed a doctorate and who intend to pursue a research project on some aspect of the history and culture of the Silk Road countries, societies, and cultures of Asia from the Western borders of China to the Mediterranean Sea, past and present, as well as their relationships with China in the East and Europe in the West.

This Research Fellowship inaugurates a broader programme of studies of the countries of the Silk Roads, which will include lectures, seminars and conferences, as well as graduate scholarships and further Research Fellowships. As well as pursuing their own research project, the successful candidate will be expected to play an active role in developing the programme and in organizing academic activity concerned with the countries of the Silk Road.

This post-doctoral Fellowship is intended to encourage research into the history and culture of the countries Silk Roads by enabling the successful candidate to complete a substantial research project on their own choosing. Projects may concern any aspect of the history or cultures of any of the peoples of the Silk Roads, from the Western borders of China to the Mediterranean Sea, but for this inaugural Research Fellowship, preference may be given to those studying the Silk Roads themselves, that is to studies of relationships and the movement of materials, knowledge, and technologies between China and the Mediterranean at any period in history up to the present day.

For further details, see https://www.kings.cam.ac.uk/research/junior-research-fellowships.

Spring Symposium Call for Communications

University of Birmingham, 28-30 March 2020

Deadline: 3 January 2020

Abstracts are invited for proposals to deliver communications at the 53rd Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies, to be held in Birmingham 28-30 March 2020 on the topic of Nature and the Environment. Communications are 12 minutes long, followed by 3 minutes of questions.

Abstracts should be 250 words in length (maximum), and are due by Friday 3 January 2020. Please send to either D.K.Reynolds@bham.ac.uk or L.Brubaker@bham.ac.uk. Successful applicants will be notified mid-January, in order to allow sufficient time to secure visas, if relevant.

Further information about travel and accommodation may be found here: https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/activity/bomgs/events/2020/53rd-spring-symposium-of-byzantine-studies.aspx.

The Programme for the Symposium is also available to download (PDF).

Summer School: Lincoln College Summer School of Greek Palaeography

Lincoln College, Oxford, 27 July-1 August 2020

Deadline: 15 January 2020

The eighth Lincoln College International Summer School in Greek Palaeography will be held on 27 July – 1 August 2020. The school offers a five-day introduction to the study of Greek manuscripts through ten reading classes, three library visits and five thematic lectures.

Costs: The school does not charge student fees. However, any faculty members admitted to the school may be charged a small fee to defray costs. Participants are individually responsible for their transportation and living expenses in Oxford. A few bursaries, covering housing (but no board), will be awarded to particularly deserving applicants.

The eighth Lincoln College International Summer School in Greek Palaeography will be held on 27 July – 1 August 2020. The school offers a five-day introduction to the study of Greek manuscripts through ten reading classes, three library visits and five thematic lectures.

Costs: The school does not charge student fees. However, any faculty members admitted to the school may be charged a small fee to defray costs. Participants are individually responsible for their transportation and living expenses in Oxford. A few bursaries, covering housing (but no board), will be awarded to particularly deserving applicants.

For full details, see https://www.lincoln.ox.ac.uk/Greek-Palaeography-About.

Call for Papers: The Distribution of Economic and Political Power in Ancient Empires

School of Classics, University of St Andrews, 10-11 June 2020

Deadline: 31 January 2020

While the distribution of wealth in modern societies has recently received considerable attention (notably following the recent work of Thomas Piketty), it remains a relatively poorly understood aspect of ancient empires. This is the more unfortunate as the economic top layers played a pivotal role in governing these empires. Administrative posts were generally assigned to wealthy men, while they simultaneously allowed these men to increase their wealth.

This conference aims to explore the distribution of wealth and its mutually constituting relationship with political power for different ancient empires. Modern scholars often assume a simple correlation between political power and wealth. This is illustrated by the pervasive use of social tables (which are based on the socio-political structure of society) to estimate the distribution of wealth. Although economic and political power networks were indeed strongly integrated in many ancient empires and this strong entanglement is further endorsed by our elitist-biased literary sources, detailed studies of premodern economies and administrations reveal a more nuanced relationship between wealth and political power.

Possible topics of papers include, but are not limited to:
· How were wealth and political power distributed?
· How different were these distributions? Did wealth and political power always coincide? Were there power dissonances, i.e. men with economic but no political power or vice versa?
· How and to what extent were economic and political power networks integrated? Were there institutionalised links?
· How could wealth be converted into political power and vice versa?
· How did the political structure influence the process of wealth concentration or vice versa? What role did the centralised government play in the concentration of economic and political power?

Papers can be comparative (comparing different empires/societies), synthetic (on developments in the longue durée) or focus on a particular case study. Papers on any preindustrial empire or society are welcome. The conference language is English. Two bursaries of £100 towards travel expenses and two nights’ accommodation are available for postgraduate speakers. Prospective speakers are invited to send a 300-word abstract to Bart Danon (bd43@st-andrews.ac.uk) by 31 January 2020.

Confirmed speakers: Mirko Canevaro (Edinburgh), Lisa Eberle (Tübingen), Michael Jursa (Vienna), John Weisweiler (Cambridge), Arjan Zuiderhoek (Ghent).

Seminar Series: KCL CHS Late Antique & Byzantine Seminar Series

Centre for Hellenic Studies, King’s College London, Strand Campus, London, October 2019-March 2020

22 October 2019, 18:00 to 20:00
Dimitris Kountouras (Athens) – Music and poetry of the Troubadours at the Latin Kingdom of Thessalonica after 1204

12 November 2019, 18:00 to 20:00
Panayiotis Panayides (Oxford) – The life histories of statues in the public baths of Salamis, Cyprus

26 November 2019, 18:00 to 20:00
Corisande Fenwick (UCL) – Building God’s Empire: Archaeology, religion and the Byzantine conquest of Africa

21 January 2020, 17:30 to 19:00
Elisabeth R. O’Connell (British Museum) – ‘For the great agape now practiced towards the poor who come to the holy monastery …’: (P.KRU 106): Care for the poor in Late Antique Egypt

11 February 2020, 17:30 to 19:00
Dionysios Stathakopoulos (KCL) – How to get (and stay) rich in the late Byzantine world

3 March 2020, 17:30 to 19:00
Marija Vukovojac (SPBS) – Stefan Nemanja, holy ruler or ruthless warrior?

17 March 2020, 17:30 to 19:00
Petros Bouras-Vallianatos (Edinburgh) – Diagnosing and Treating Disease in Byzantine Hospitals