Spring Symposium Call for Communications

University of Birmingham, 28-30 March 2020

Deadline: 3 January 2020

Abstracts are invited for proposals to deliver communications at the 53rd Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies, to be held in Birmingham 28-30 March 2020 on the topic of Nature and the Environment. Communications are 12 minutes long, followed by 3 minutes of questions.

Abstracts should be 250 words in length (maximum), and are due by Friday 3 January 2020. Please send to either D.K.Reynolds@bham.ac.uk or L.Brubaker@bham.ac.uk. Successful applicants will be notified mid-January, in order to allow sufficient time to secure visas, if relevant.

Further information about travel and accommodation may be found here: https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/activity/bomgs/events/2020/53rd-spring-symposium-of-byzantine-studies.aspx.

The Programme for the Symposium is also available to download (PDF).

Summer School: Lincoln College Summer School of Greek Palaeography

Lincoln College, Oxford, 27 July-1 August 2020

Deadline: 15 January 2020

The eighth Lincoln College International Summer School in Greek Palaeography will be held on 27 July – 1 August 2020. The school offers a five-day introduction to the study of Greek manuscripts through ten reading classes, three library visits and five thematic lectures.

Costs: The school does not charge student fees. However, any faculty members admitted to the school may be charged a small fee to defray costs. Participants are individually responsible for their transportation and living expenses in Oxford. A few bursaries, covering housing (but no board), will be awarded to particularly deserving applicants.

The eighth Lincoln College International Summer School in Greek Palaeography will be held on 27 July – 1 August 2020. The school offers a five-day introduction to the study of Greek manuscripts through ten reading classes, three library visits and five thematic lectures.

Costs: The school does not charge student fees. However, any faculty members admitted to the school may be charged a small fee to defray costs. Participants are individually responsible for their transportation and living expenses in Oxford. A few bursaries, covering housing (but no board), will be awarded to particularly deserving applicants.

For full details, see https://www.lincoln.ox.ac.uk/Greek-Palaeography-About.

Summer School: Dumbarton Oaks/HMML Syriac and Armenian Summer School 2020

Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota, USA, 13 July-7 August 2020

Deadline: 15 February 2020

Dumbarton Oaks in collaboration with the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML) announces two intensive four-week language courses: Intermediate Syriac and Introduction to Classical Armenian.

The programme, sponsored and funded by Dumbarton Oaks, will be hosted at HMML, located on the campus of Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota. The summer school will run from July 13 to August 7, 2020. The audience is doctoral students or recent PhDs who can demonstrate a need for Syriac or Armenian in their research.

For those applying for Introductory Classical Armenian, no prior knowledge is expected but some preparation as directed by the instructors will be required before arrival. Those with significant prior study of Aremenian (e.g., a semester-long class) will not be considered. Following this intensive course, students will be able to continue reading on their own or to enter reading courses at other institutions.

The courses will also include an introduction to paleography and to the study and use of manuscripts, especially those now available in the vHMML Reading Room from HMML’s vast collection of digitized manuscripts.

Approximately ten places will be available for each course. Costs for tuition, housing, and meals will be covered by Dumbarton Oaks. The selected participants will be responsible for their own travel costs to and from Saint John’s University. The deadline for applications is February 15, 2020.

For further information, see http://hmml.org/events/summer-courses/.

Fellowship: Byzantine Studies Postdoctoral Fellowship 2020-21

Medieval Institute University of Notre Dame, IN, USA

Deadline: 1 February 2020

Following substantial investment in the area of Byzantine Studies at the University of Notre Dame, including the acquisition of the Milton V. Anastos Library of Byzantine Civilization and generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Medieval Institute at the University of Notre Dame is delighted to invite applicants for a nine-month Postdoctoral Fellowship in Byzantine Studies. This fellowship is designed for junior scholars with a completed doctorate whose research deals with some aspect of the Byzantine world. The fellow is expected to pursue promising research towards scholarly publication and/or the development of new subject areas. This Fellowship is open to qualified applicants in all fields and sub-disciplines of Byzantine Studies, such as history (including its auxiliary disciplines), archaeology, art history, literature, theology, and liturgical studies, as well as the study of Byzantium’s interactions with neighboring cultures. The fellowship holder will pursue research in residence at the University of Notre Dame’s famed Medieval Institute during the academic year.

The intent of this Fellowship is to enable its holder to do innovative research drawing on the rich resources held in the Milton V. Anastos Collection, the Medieval Institute, and the Hesburgh Library more broadly. This may include the completion of book manuscripts and articles, work on text editions, or the development of new trajectories of research in one of the aforementioned fields. The Fellowship carries no teaching responsibilities, but the fellow will have the opportunity to participate in the multidisciplinary activities of Notre Dame faculty related to Byzantium, Eastern Christianity, and the history of the Levant. The Fellow will be provided with a private workspace in the Medieval Institute, enjoy full library and computer privileges, and have access to all the Institute’s research tools.

In addition, towards the conclusion of the fellowship period the fellow’s work will be at the center of a workshop organized within the framework of the Byzantine Studies Seminar. Senior scholars, chosen in cooperation with the Medieval Institute, will be invited for this event treating the fellow’s subject matter. The senior scholars will discuss draft versions of the fellow’s book manuscript or articles or discuss the further development of ongoing research projects.

Qualifications: Byzantine Studies fellows must hold a Ph.D. from an internationally recognized institution. The Ph.D. must be in hand by the beginning of the fellowship term.

Application Instructions: Applicants should submit a letter of application (cover letter), a project proposal of no more than 2500 words, a current C.V., and three letters of recommendation. Applicants will also complete an informational sheet in Interfolio. To apply, see here.

Call for Papers: Theandrites: Byzantine Philosophy and Christian Platonism (284-1453)

International Society of Neoplatonic Studies Conference, Athens, Greece, 10-14 June 2020

Deadline: 1 February 2020

This panel focuses on the reception of Platonism in the Christian philosophy of the Byzantine era (4th-15th centuries), an era marking the creation of a unique dialogue between Hellenic Platonism and the theology of the Church Fathers and Byzantine Christians.

The panel is open to all issues relating to Byzantine Platonism. This includes: Christians in the Greek-speaking East and their relationship to the Latin tradition in the West, as well as the Christian Platonism found in contemporary church fathers, the Greek-speaking Christians in late antique Gaza, Athens, and Alexandria; the philosophical theology of Pseudo-Dionysius, Maximus, and John Damascene; the later reception of Platonic theories on the soul, time, and eternity, and metaphysics, as well as ritual among Greek Christians and Hellenes. We welcome papers that trace Platonic ideas, terminology, and methodology as they move throughout the Eastern Roman Empire and the Byzantine Orthodox world.

300 word abstract should be sent to Sarah Wear (swear@franciscan.edu) and Frederick Lauritzen (frederick.lauritzen@new.oxon.org). Papers presented in Athens will be published in the series Theandrites: Studies in Byzantine Philosophy and Christian Platonism (284-1453) (after peer review).

Summer School: German for Students of Classical Studies

University of Cologne, Germany, 8-17 June 2020

Deadline: 31 January 2020

The Department for Classical Studies of the University of Cologne is now accepting applications for the 2020 “German for Students of Classical Studies” summer course. The course will take place from June 8 to July 17, 2020. It is specially designed to meet the lingustic needs of students of Classics who wish to expand their knowledge of written and spoken academic German.

The program includes a language class, reading tutorials, field trips to archaeological sites in the Rhineland and the opportunity to take part in the academic life of the Classics department of the University of Cologne.

The deadline for applications is January 31, 2020. All the relevant information, including a flyer for download, can be found here. If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to send an e-mail to: german-for-classics@uni-koeln.de.

Merchants and Markets in Late Antiquity

Society for Classical Studies Annual Meeting, Chicago, USA, 7-10 January 2021

Deadline: 7 February 2020

We are inviting the submission of abstracts for the organizer-refereed panel ‘Merchants and Markets in Late Antiquity’ at the 2021 annual meeting of the Society for Classical Studies. This annual meeting will be held in Chicago from January 7-10, 2021. The deadline for submitting an abstract is February 7, 2020.

A social, cultural, and economic history of work and trade in the later Roman empire remains to be written. Recent years have seen a renewed interest in labour, professions, commerce, and their organization during the Imperial period, while the last two decades have been a remarkably productive time for the study of the Roman economy in general. The resultant scholarship has presented new approaches which have greatly advanced our understanding of both structural and specific characteristics of the economy. The most influential of these has been the adoption of New Institutional Economics (e.g. Scheidel, Morris, and Saller 2007), but there has also been a steady stream of microeconomic studies focusing on the social elements of economic activity (Terpstra 2013; Venticinque 2016; Hawkins 2016) and sociocultural histories of work and professions (e.g. Verboven and Laes 2016). Some of this scholarship has extended into Late Antiquity, though the most influential work remains Wickham’s magisterial Framing the Early Middle Ages (2006). Nevertheless, scholarship on the later Roman world has not yet sought to integrate the economic theories that have reconditioned the way of writing the socio-economic history of the early Roman Empire.

The future of late Roman social and economic history lies in utilizing and adapting innovative approaches to the Roman economy for the study of Late Antiquity. The institutional change for which this period is known offers plentiful opportunities to consider how individual economic actors were affected by structural, religious, and political changes, and the field is ripe for a re-evaluation of the intersection between social norms and the economy.

This panel hopes to bring together scholars from a wide range of subjects and backgrounds, and to solicit abstracts for papers considering a variety of issues and addressing such diverse questions as:

· What awareness did local merchants, craftsmen, and transporters have of wider economic change in Late Antiquity?
· What strategies did these individuals develop to mitigate risk and resolve economic challenges, and are the strategies of Late Antiquity fundamentally different in some way from those used in earlier or later periods?
· Can we speak of market integration or disintegration in Late Antiquity?
· What were the outcomes of state institutional and structural changes to the economy at local and regional levels?
· What effects did the development of new legal and fiscal systems have on the social and political lives of merchants and craftsmen?

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be submitted as email attachments to info@classicalstudies.org by February 7, 2020. The title of the email should be the title of the panel. Abstracts should contain a title of the paper, but should not have any information regarding the identity of the submitter. All abstracts for papers will be reviewed anonymously. For enquiries, please email Jane Sancinito (jsancini@oberlin.edu) or John Fabiano (john.fabiano@utoronto.ca).

Call for Papers: Cappadocia and Cappadocians in the Hellenistic, Roman and early Byzantine periods

Dokuz Eylül University, Izmir, Turkey, May 14-15, 2020

Deadline: 31 December 2019

In scholarly research Cappadocia is known more through Byzantine mural paintings in cave churches at Göreme and Ürgüp from the eighth-ninth centuries to the 13th-century A.D., but the number of studies on Hellenistic and Roman Cappadocia is rather limited. The aim of this symposium is therefore to report on the state of research concerning Cappadocia between the late-fourth century B.C. and mid-seventh century A.D. We warmly invite contributions by scholars and graduate students from a variety of disciplines related to this region. Intended to bring together scholars of archaeology, history, historical geography, epigraphy and other related disciplines in ancient Anatolian studies to discuss a range of issues concerning this region’s archaeology and history, this symposium should be an excellent opportunity to increase our knowledge about this region.

For full details, see the call for papers.

Call for Papers: Literary connections between the Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles and the Saints’ Lives

First International conference on Early Christian Literature, Late Antique and Byzantine Hagiography

Universitat de València, Valencia, Spain, 1-3 July 2020

Deadline: 31 January 2020

The similarities between Early Christian literature and Late Antique and Byzantine Hagiography are very clear, since both use identical literary models and motifs in their narrations and are created in a similar ideological and geographical framework.

This connection between the literature from the Early Christian Era (2nd-4th centuries) and Late Antique and Byzantine Hagiography (5th to 15th centuries) are much more significant, if two literary genres such as the Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles and the Saints’ Lives are studied and perceived as a whole. Thus, in the former one can observe a wide range of literary motifs that will be developed later by Late Antique or Byzantine hagiographers, especially in the Saints’ Lives. In fact, from a global perspective the Early Christian literature dealing with the apostles and their missions could be interpreted as a sort of protohagiography, a clear antecedent of the narrations found later in Hagiography in Late Antiquity or the Byzantine Era.

For these reasons, this conference is aimed at analyzing this literary phenomenon from a multidisciplinary point of view. The sessions of the conference will be focused on the study of the Apocryphal Acts of the Apostle –not only the so called “Major”, but also other texts related to this tradition, i.e. the Acts of Philip or the Acts of Xanthippe and Polixena– and the Eastern saints’ lives composed from the 5th century onwards. Among the papers on these topics, discussion on other tradition different than the Greek one, such as the Arabic, Syriac, Ethiopic, Coptic, Armenian, Georgian, Slavonic or Latin, will be very welcome.

For details, see the full call for papers.

Call for Papers: The Distribution of Economic and Political Power in Ancient Empires

School of Classics, University of St Andrews, 10-11 June 2020

Deadline: 31 January 2020

While the distribution of wealth in modern societies has recently received considerable attention (notably following the recent work of Thomas Piketty), it remains a relatively poorly understood aspect of ancient empires. This is the more unfortunate as the economic top layers played a pivotal role in governing these empires. Administrative posts were generally assigned to wealthy men, while they simultaneously allowed these men to increase their wealth.

This conference aims to explore the distribution of wealth and its mutually constituting relationship with political power for different ancient empires. Modern scholars often assume a simple correlation between political power and wealth. This is illustrated by the pervasive use of social tables (which are based on the socio-political structure of society) to estimate the distribution of wealth. Although economic and political power networks were indeed strongly integrated in many ancient empires and this strong entanglement is further endorsed by our elitist-biased literary sources, detailed studies of premodern economies and administrations reveal a more nuanced relationship between wealth and political power.

Possible topics of papers include, but are not limited to:
· How were wealth and political power distributed?
· How different were these distributions? Did wealth and political power always coincide? Were there power dissonances, i.e. men with economic but no political power or vice versa?
· How and to what extent were economic and political power networks integrated? Were there institutionalised links?
· How could wealth be converted into political power and vice versa?
· How did the political structure influence the process of wealth concentration or vice versa? What role did the centralised government play in the concentration of economic and political power?

Papers can be comparative (comparing different empires/societies), synthetic (on developments in the longue durée) or focus on a particular case study. Papers on any preindustrial empire or society are welcome. The conference language is English. Two bursaries of £100 towards travel expenses and two nights’ accommodation are available for postgraduate speakers. Prospective speakers are invited to send a 300-word abstract to Bart Danon (bd43@st-andrews.ac.uk) by 31 January 2020.

Confirmed speakers: Mirko Canevaro (Edinburgh), Lisa Eberle (Tübingen), Michael Jursa (Vienna), John Weisweiler (Cambridge), Arjan Zuiderhoek (Ghent).