Conference: Dissidence and Persecution in Byzantium

20th Australasian Association for Byzantine Studies Conference, Macquarie University, Sydney, 19-21 July 2019

The Byzantine empire was rarely a stable and harmonious state during its long and eventful history. It was often in strife with those outside its borders and with those within them, and with so much power invested in its political and ecclesiastical structures it was ready to implode at times. This could result in persecution and the silencing of dissident voices from various quarters of society. The mechanisms by which the authorities controlled civil disorder and dissent, as well as discouraging criticism of imperial policies, could be brutal at times. In what sense was it possible, if at all, to enjoy freedom of speech and action in Byzantium? Was the law upheld or ignored when vested interests were at stake? How vulnerable did minorities feel and how conformist was religious belief at the end of the day? The theme of the conference aims to encourage discussion on a number fronts relating to the use and abuse of power within the history of Byzantium.

Keynote speakers:

Professor David Olster (University of Kentucky)
Title: The Idolatry of the Jews and the Anti-Judaizing Roots of Seventh- and Early Eighth-Century Iconoclasm

Associate Professor Jitse Dijkstra (University of Ottawa)
Title: The Avenging Sword? Imperial Legislation Against Temples in the Fourth and Fifth Centuries

For full details and registration, see http://events.mq.edu.au/AABS20

Call for Papers: Biblical Poetry: the Legacy of the Psalms in Late Antiquity and Byzantium

Ghent University, Belgiumm, 23-24 April 2020

Deadline: 31 May 2019

The Psalms, in their Greek Septuagint translation, were a fundamental corpus of biblical poetry, and as such were continuously referred to in Christian literature. They played a key role in the daily life and in the development of religious sensitivity of late antique and Byzantine people. The production of Psalm-related literature, notably exegetic, was impressively widespread. The Psalms, however, influenced other genres of religious literature as well, and their poetical nature remained an important feature that later authors were well aware of.

In preparation of a volume on the reception of the Psalms in poetry from Late Antiquity and Byzantium, we invite scholars of all levels of experience to present a paper at a colloquium on this subject.

Confirmed speakers are Andrew Faulkner, Antonia Giannouli, Christian Høgel and Maria Ypsilanti.

We welcome contributions on the following topics especially:
• the appreciation of the Psalter’s poetical nature in exegesis and in the biblical manuscript tradition (e.g. recognition, by patristic and Byzantine exegetes, of the presence or absence of poetical features);
• rhetorical aspects of the Psalms as highlighted in late antique and Byzantine treatises;
• the influence of the Psalms on Byzantine poetry (e.g. what was their role in the composition of eis heauton poems? How does self-expression in Christian poetry relate to the Psalms?);
• the reception of the Psalms in hymnographic poetry;
• the reception of the Psalter in specific genres of poetry, such as Byzantine catanyctic poetry;
• the metrical metaphrases by ps-Apollinaris and Manuel Philes;
• metrical paratexts on the Psalms.

These examples are not exclusive and papers on other related topics are welcome.

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers. Each paper will be followed by a reaction from a respondent, who will open the discussion with the audience. Contributors whose abstract is accepted will be asked to submit prior to the colloquium a rough draft of their full text. After the conference, they are expected to offer their re-worked paper for inclusion (upon acceptance after peer-review) in a volume on the reception of the Psalms in Byzantine poetry.

Please send a title and a short abstract (max. 300 words) of your paper to rachele.ricceri@ugent.be no later than May 31, 2019. Accepted speakers will be notified by the end of June 2019.

For more information, please visit our website.

Organisers: Floris Bernard, Reinhart Ceulemans, Cristina Cocola, Kristoffel Demoen, Anna Gioffreda, Andreas Rhoby, Rachele Ricceri.

This colloquium is organised within the framework of the projects David, our Orpheus. Reception, Rewritings and Adaptations of the Psalms in Byzantine Poetry (funded by the FWO – Flemish Research Foundation) and The Legacy of the Psalms in Byzantine Poetry: Book Epigrams and Metrical Paraphrases (funded by the FWO – Flemish Research Foundation and the FWF – Austrian Science Fund), which are being carried out at Ghent University, KU Leuven and the Austrian Academy of Sciences.

Job: Visiting Assistant Professor of Art History (Greek Art and Architecture)

Stockton University, NJ, USA

The Visual Arts Program at Stockton University invites applications for a one-year Visiting Assistant Professor of Art History beginning September 2019. Ph.D. required (or must have Ph.D. by September 2019) with college-level teaching experience and publications record. The preferred candidate will specialize in Greek art and architecture and have access to an active archaeological project in Greece or Cyprus. Consideration is also given to specialists in Byzantine art and architecture or other ancient specializations. Ability to teach more broadly within art history curriculum and academic experience with culturally diverse populations desired.

The successful applicant will teach courses in area of specialization, two-semester art history survey, and other courses as needed, including courses for the University’s General Studies program. One course in archaeology is required each year with preference given to candidates who can offer summer field work for students. The position includes endowed research funding and support for students traveling abroad established through the Pappas Center for Hellenic Studies. The faculty member will participate in Pappas Center for Hellenic Studies programming on campus and beyond. Teaching load is six four-credit courses per year.

The job is posted here:
https://stockton.hiretouch.com/job-details?jobID=1606&job=visiting-assistant-professor-of-art-history-13d

Call for Papers: True Warriors? Negotiating Dissent in the Intellectual Debate (c. 1100-1700)

9th International Lectio Conference, Leuven, Belgium, 11-13 December 2019

Deadline: 15 April 2019

Dissent, polemics and rivalry have always been at the center of intellectual development. The scholarly Streitkultur was given a fresh impetus by the newly founded universities in the High Middle Ages and later turned into a quintessential part of early modern intellectual life. It was not only mirrored in various well-known intellectual debates and controversies – e.g. between Aristotelians and Augustinians, scholastics and humanists, Catholics and Protestants – but also embodied in numerous literary genres and non-literary modes of expression – e.g. disputationes, invectives, consilia, images, carnivalesque parades, music, etc. – and discursive or political strategies – patronage, networks and alliances. Moreover, the harsh debates notwithstanding, consensus was also actively searched for, both within particular disciplines and within society as a whole.

The aforementioned genres and strategies are all modes of negotiating dissent, which raises several important questions regarding these intellectual ‘warriors’. What were the most important issues at stake and how were they debated? Did the debates in the public sphere reflect the private opinions of the scholars involved? What access do we have to those private opinions? Can we approach such controversies in terms of authenticity and truthfulness, or consistency and coherence? Is there a contrast between ego-documents and the published part of an author’s oeuvre?

Starting from these questions, the aim of this conference is to study the polemical strategies and the modes of rivalry and alliance in scholarly debate from the twelfth through the seventeenth centuries. We actively invite papers from a variety of perspectives and disciplines (civil and canon law, philosophy, theology and religious studies, literary studies, historiography, art history, etc.) and aim to study texts in Latin, Greek and the vernacular, as well as pictorial and performative traditions. We do not only welcome specific case studies, but also (strongly) encourage broader (meta)perspectives, e.g.of a diachronic or transdisciplinary nature. The conference will span the period from the twelfth until the seventeenth centuries.

For full details, see http://lectio.ghum.kuleuven.be/conferences/

Conference: Syriac Worlds: Interactions, Exchanges, Contributions

Brown University, Providence, RI, USA, 16-19 June 2019

The Eighth North American Syriac Symposium will convene at Brown University on June 16-19, 2019. Held every four years since 1991, the North American Syriac Symposium brings together scholars and students for exchange and discussion on a wide variety of topics related to the language, literature, and cultural history of Syriac Christianity, extending chronologically from the first centuries CE to the present day and geographically from Syriac Christianity’s homeland in the Middle East to South India, China, and the worldwide diaspora.

Registration is now open. For details, see https://www.brown.edu/academics/religious-studies/events-0/syriac-symposium

Call for Articles: Frankokratia: A Journal for the Study of Greek Lands under Latin Rule (to appear from 2020)

Frankokratia (Gr. Φραγκοκρατία, or ‘Frankish rule’) is a peer-reviewed scholarly journal committed to publishing original research on all areas of the Greek world where Latin (‘Roman Catholic’) populations from western Europe settled in the aftermath of the crusades. Collectively known as ‘Franks’ in the East irrespective of their exact place of origin, these settlers established shorter- or longer-lived polities on lands formerly belonging to the Byzantine Empire and inhabited by people of the Greek (‘Orthodox’) and various Eastern Christian rites, Jews and Muslims. Although the core focus of the journal lies on the regions conquered in the context of the Third and Fourth Crusades, to embrace the full breadth of this phenomenon the journal’s chronological and geographical scope ranges widely from the conquests of Southern Italy and Antioch in the eleventh century to the fall of the last Venetian colonies in the eighteenth century.

Frankokratia has been conceived as an interdisciplinary forum bringing together innovative work by specialists in archaeology, architecture, art, codicology, culture, diplomacy, economics, language, law, literature, musicology, numismatics, politics, religion, society, theology, war, and all related topics. Moreover, it aspires to bridge the perennial epistemological divide between western medieval and Byzantine studies and to overcome the mutual isolation of specialists on Greece, Cyprus, and other regions, offering a venue for the publication of collaborative research efforts and encouraging the fruitful cross-pollination between these and other fields. The journal welcomes the submission of both broader historiographical surveys and more focused studies, including essays presenting previously unpublished source material in the form of texts and images. This versatility in terms of content and methodology will allow Frankokratia to broach the multifaceted issues raised by the study of the complex societies of the Greco-Latin sphere in a more holistic fashion, helping weave a richer tapestry of the history and culture of the post-classical Mediterranean.

For further information, see: https://brill.com/view/journals/fra/fra-overview.xml

Call for Papers: Georgia – Byzantium – Christian East

Tbilisi, Georgia, 18-20 June 2019

Deadline: 29 March 2019

Korneli Kekelidze Georgian National Center of Manuscripts has the pleasure to announce the Second International Conference “Georgia – Byzantium – Christian East.” The conference will be held in Tbilisi, Georgia (1/3 M. Aleksidze. Tbilisi, Georgia, 0193) between 18-20 June 2019. As usual, the working languages will be Georgian and English.

CVs and abstracts of your contributions (not more than 500 words max; Georgian texts in AcadNusx, English texts in Times New Roman; English translation should be attached to Georgian texts) should be submitted by e-mail: georgianmanuscript@gmail.com

Successful participants will be informed in the first decade of April. The details about accommodation and other practical aspects will be communicated after approval.

No registration fee required.

The conference covers all aspects of Medieval Georgian, Byzantine and Christian East Literature, history, theology, art history and digital humanities.

Conference: Late Byzantine Cities

Bahçeşehir University, Istanbul, Turkey, 20-23 August 2019

Please note the new date above.

The late Byzantine world (1204-1461) was distinguished by the existence of multiple, competing, and interconnected cities in contrast to the centrality of Constantinople in previous periods. Late Byzantine cities in fact constituted centers, rather than marginal lands, as they are often portrayed in historical studies.

For details, see https://latebyzantinecities.com/

Call for papers: Narration in Byzantium: Synchronic and Diachronic Narratological Perspectives

3rd Byzantine Colloquium of the University of Buenos Aires, Section of Medieval Philology – Institute of Classical Philology, Faculty of Philosophy and Literature, University of Buenos Aires, 29–30 August 2019

Deadline: 31 May 2019

The last years have witnessed a surge of narratological studies focusing on the vast Byzantine literary and artistic production, a recent example being the volume Storytelling in Byzantium. Narratological Approaches to Byzantine Texts and Images (ed. Ch. Messis – M. MulleJ – I. Nilsson). Today, Byzantinists apply sophisticated narratological techniques not only to narrative texts, but also to images and, in line with M. Fludernik’s theory, to non-narrative texts. A common language and a shared theoretical framework would be instrumental in making Byzantine narratological studies more unitary, in fostering the transdisciplinary dialogue with other fields of research, such as Classical, Medieval and Renaissance Studies, and in popularizing it among wider audiences.

In that context, the present colloquium wishes to provide Byzantinists and specialists in other disciplines with a forum of discussion and reflection on the narratological tools applied to their respective corpora, in order to conceptualize the specificity (or absence thereof) of Byzantine narration, from a synchronic and diachronic point of view, and to compare it, utilizing well-stablished and shared analytical categories, with other literary and artistic productions, contemporary or not.

We invite 20-minute papers on any topic pertinent to narrative in Byzantium in the widest sense. Please send your abstract no later than May 31, 2019 to tomas.fernandez@conicet.gov.ar, pablo.a.cavallero@gmail.com and reinhart.ceulemans@kuleuven.be.

Abstracts should 1000 characters or less (blank spaces included, but not counting bibliographical references), and should clearly state the hypothesis, goals and (expected) conclusions of the presentation.

Attendance of the conference will amount to 30 US$ ($500 for Argentina residents; $400 for members of SAEMED, AADEC or CAEBIZ). For students, doctoral students and research assistants, attendance is free.

Papers must be sent no later than July 19, 2019. 8 pp. Palatino Linotype 11; space between lines: 1½. Margins: 2 cm