Call for Papers: Medieval Religion(s)

58th Annual Midwest Medieval History Conference, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN, USA, 20-21 September 2019

Deadline: 8 March 2019

The conference will begin on Friday afternoon with graduate papers and a keynote by Anne E. Lester, John W. Baldwin and Jenny Jochens Associate Professor of Medieval History at Johns Hopkins University. She is the author of Creating Cistercian Nuns: The Women’s Religious Movement and Its Reform in Thirteenth-Century Champagne and has co-edited volumes on medieval materiality, religious movements, and crusades and memory.

The remainder of Friday and Saturday’s program will feature scholarly papers on all aspects of medieval history, especially those related to this year’s theme: Medieval Religion(s), and an exhibit of manuscripts. We welcome papers by graduate students (those presenting receive an honorarium), and independent, early-stage, and senior scholars. The programming committee is also happy to consider proposals addressing teaching, pedagogy, and digital humanities. Abstracts of 250-300 words may be emailed to the program chair, Jessalynn Bird, at jbird@saintmarys.edu. Queries regarding organization may be sent to the conference organizer, Daniel Hobbins, at dhobbins@nd.edu.

Grant: Bliss Symposium Awards

Deadline: 1 March 2019

Each year, Dumbarton Oaks hosts the Byzantine Studies Symposium. The Bliss Symposium Awards, which offer partial reimbursement for the cost of travel to Washington, DC, local accommodations, and other approved expenses related to symposium attendance are now expanded to include non-Harvard students. Students from both US and international institutions are encouraged to apply. Available to both graduate and undergraduate students with a demonstrated interest in Byzantine Studies, applications are due by March 1 to Byzantine@doaks.org.

Job: Postdoctoral Fellow in Byzantine Art/Archaeology, Image Collections and Fieldwork Archives (ICFA), Dumbarton Oaks Research Library

Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, D.C., USA

Deadline: 28 February 2019

Dumbarton Oaks is a research institute affiliated with Harvard University that supports research internationally in the field of Byzantine Studies. In addition to world-renowned library and museum collections, Dumbarton Oaks’ Image Collections and Fieldwork Archives (ICFA) holds more than a million unique items in a variety of media. Dumbarton Oaks is launching a three-year Access Initiative to expand opportunities to engage with its resources and collections by scholars and the general public. One goal of the Access Initiative is to create more professional opportunities for early-career PhDs in the areas of study supported by Dumbarton Oaks. The Postdoctoral Fellowship in Byzantine Art/Archaeology (ICFA) is one of several opportunities that Dumbarton Oaks is announcing for 2019/2020 under this initiative.

The Postdoctoral Fellow in Byzantine Art/Archaeology will receive training in archival processing and digital curation and will support digitization initiatives to increase access to ICFA collections for scholars and the public. The Fellow will be fully integrated into the Library and Byzantine Program and will work closely with staff and Dumbarton Oaks researchers to establish intellectual control over ICFA’s multi-media holdings. The Fellow will support the ongoing cataloging of the Frank Kidner archive of Syria photos from the 1990s, a collection of nearly 10,000 color slides documenting in rich detail a great number of sites, including many that have now been fundamentally altered or completely destroyed. As that project reaches completion, the Fellow will assist with setting priorities for the cataloging, processing, and digitization of other collections related to Byzantine Art and Archaeology, based on their intellectual and cultural significance. Outcomes of the fellowship may include a research gateway similar to Dumbarton Oaks’ Moche Iconography site: https://www.doaks.org/resources/moche-iconography. This fellowship offers unique opportunities to build career skills in special collections and digital technologies while benefitting from the unique resources of Dumbarton Oaks. The Fellow will benefit from Dumbarton Oaks’ dynamic community of scholars and programming in Byzantine Studies and will devote 20% of the fellowship time to personal research.

For full details and applications, see https://www.doaks.org/about/employment/post-doctoral-fellow-in-byzantine-art-archaeology-image-collections-and-fieldwork-archives-icfa-dumbarton-oaks-research-library

Job: Museum Director, Dumbarton Oaks

Dumbarton Oaks, Washington D.C., USA

Dumbarton Oaks is a Harvard research institute, museum, library, and historic garden in Washington, D.C. The institute supports research and learning internationally in Byzantine, Garden and Landscape, and Pre-Columbian studies. The Museum is renowned for its world-class Byzantine and Pre-Columbian collections, and select works of European art. The Museum, open six days/week free of charge, has close ties to local and Harvard communities and engages scholars and visitors from all over the world through exhibitions, gallery talks, and class visits. Dumbarton Oaks is a vibrant home of the humanities with an overarching mission of communicating the value of culture and advanced research to the broadest possible public.

The Museum Director will lead the Museum team in planning and delivering innovative exhibits that will highlight the Dumbarton Oaks collections and may include collaborations with the three programs of study and the library, rare book, and image collections. The Museum Director will oversee long-term exhibition planning, budget, and all aspects of Museum operations, in close conjunction with other departments of Dumbarton Oaks. The ideal candidate will combine deep knowledge of at least one area of the Dumbarton Oaks collections with the promise of strong leadership and a proven record of collaboration. The incumbent will join Dumbarton Oaks at an exciting time of expansion of both our academic and our public programs and will be encouraged to foster links between the Museum and the research institute, help develop new educational programs for DC students, and provide open and free access to the collections through digital initiatives.

For full details and online application, see DO’s website.

Call for Sessions: Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the BSC

Deadline: 10 February 2019

As part of its ongoing commitment to Byzantine studies, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 45th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference to be held in Madison, Wisconsin, October 17–20, 2019. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.

Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website site (https://maryjahariscenter.org/sponsored-sessions/45th-annual-byzantine-studies-conference). The deadline for submission is February 10, 2019. Proposals should include:

•Proposed session title
•CV of session organizer
•300-word session summary, which includes a summary of the overall topic, the format for the panel (such as a debate, papers followed by a discussion, or a traditional session of papers), and the reasons for covering the topic as a prearranged, whole session
•Session chair and academic affiliation. Please note: Session chairs cannot present a paper in the session.
•Information about the four papers to be presented in the session. For each paper: name of presenter and academic affiliation, proposed paper title, and 500-word abstract. Please note: Presenters must be members of BSANA in good standing.

Session organizers must present a paper in the session or chair the session. If a co-organzier is proposed for the session, the co-organizer must also give a paper in the session or chair the session.

Applicants will be notified by February 15, 2019. The organizer of the selected session is responsible for submitting the session to the BSC by February 25, 2019. Instructions for submitting the panel proposal are included in the BSC Call for Papers (http://www.bsana.net/conference/2019_BSANA_CFP.pdf).

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse session participants (presenters and chair, if the proposed chair is selected by the BSC program committee) up to $600 maximum for North American residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from abroad. Funding is through reimbursement only (check issued in US dollars or wire transfer); advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

Call for Papers: 45th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference (BSC 2019)

Madison, Wisconsin, USA, 17-20 October 2019

Deadline: 25 February 2019

The Forty-fifth annual Byzantine Studies Conference (BSC) will be held in Madison, Wisconsin, from Thursday evening, October 17, through Sunday afternoon, October 20, 2019. For information on BSANA, please consult the BSANA website, http://www.bsana.net.

The BSC is the annual forum for the presentation and discussion of papers on every aspect of Byzantine Studies and on related topics relevant to the field. Conference attendance is open to all, regardless of nationality or academic status.

The BSC is also the occasion of the annual business meeting of the Byzantine Studies Association of North America (BSANA). All conference attendees are warmly encouraged to attend and participate in the annual BSANA business lunch and meeting, which will be conducted on Saturday, October 19th.

For details, download the Call for Papers BSC 2019.

Summer school: Byzantine Coins and Seals Summer Program

Dumbarton Oaks, Washington D.C., USA, 1-26 July 2019

Deadline: 18 February 2019

Coins and seals offer priceless insight into many aspects of the Byzantine world, including historical geography, prosopography, paleography, art history, theology, and economic, institutional, and administrative history. Dumbarton Oaks’ collections of twelve thousand coins and seventeen thousand lead seals form the finest, largest, and most comprehensive specialized assemblages in the world.

For nearly two decades, the Byzantine Coins and Seals Summer Program has provided students with access to these unparalleled collections. Dumbarton Oaks will offer the program again this summer, from July 1 to 26, 2019, under the direction of Dr. Alan Stahl (Princeton University) and Dr. Jonathan Shea (Dumbarton Oaks).

Applications from doctoral students in any area of Byzantine studies, junior faculty members teaching at least one course in Byzantine studies at a college or university, or junior curators with responsibility for Byzantine objects will be given highest priority. Other complete applications may be considered on a case-by-case basis if space is available.

Acceptance is contingent on verification of the applicant’s status as a doctoral student, junior faculty, or junior curator. Two years of college-level Classical Greek (or its equivalent) is required for participation in the program and reading knowledge of French and German is highly desirable.

For full details, see Dumbarton Oaks’ website.

Call for Papers: Byzantine Materiality

St Vladimir’s Seminary, 575 Scarsdale Road, Yonkers, NY, USA, 8-11 May 2019

Deadline: 1 February 2019

The Sacred Arts Initiative of St. Vladimir’s Seminary is pleased to announce a conference on “Byzantine Materiality” to be held May 8-11, 2019.

Popular descriptions of Byzantium often emphasize the mystical and immaterial while overlooking the mediating role of matter implied by the Christian belief in the incarnation. In the field of art history and across the humanities, a new interest in matter and materials constitutes what is now being referred to as the “material turn” or “new materialisms.” This conference explores matter, materials, and materiality in Byzantine art and culture. It aims to examine material strategies of objects, makers, and users; the agency and affective properties of materials and objects; Byzantine depictions and descriptions of matter in images and texts; and the senses and embodied experiences in Byzantium.

In addition to our speakers, limited space is available for additional 20 minute papers.

We invite scholars and graduate students from a range of fields—including but not limited to history of art and architecture, archeology, liturgical studies, musicology/sound studies, theology, philosophy, and history—to submit paper proposals. Please send your abstract (300 words maximum) and academic CV to Evan Freeman at byzantinemateriality@svots.edu by February 1, 2019. Limited financial aid is available for graduate students giving papers.

For more information, please visit: http://sacredartsinitiative.com/byzantinemateriality.

Call for Papers: Late Antique Textualities

Society for Classical Studies, Washington, D.C., USA, 2-5 January 2020

Deadline: 23 February 2019

In Latin, textus can mean a piece of weaving. Late antiquity is well thought of as a text or a collocation of texts in which many strands are woven together— strands of the old (the Classical past, old genres, persisting aspects of material culture) and strands of the new (Christianity, new or hybridized written genres, new or hybridized elements in material culture or the built environment). At the meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in Washington, D.C., January 2–5, 2020, the Society for Late Antiquity will sponsor a session on the various textualities in late antiquity.
We are looking for papers on textuality in either written texts or material culture. Papers can consider issues of textuality in late-ancient written texts, e.g., language, intertextuality with prior written texts (pagan or Christian), or even genre. Potential panelists could also propose papers that consider textuality in material culture or the built environment, e.g., aesthetics, building styles, or methods that weave together old and new. We also encourage prospective panelists to construe the term textuality broadly and propose papers that transcend and/or question the options enumerated here.

Abstracts for papers requiring a maximum of 20 minutes to deliver should be sent no later than February 23, 2019 by email attachment to Colin Whiting at cwhiting@ascsa.org. All submissions will be judged anonymously by two referees. Prospective panelists must be members in good standing of the SCS at the time of submission and must include their membership number in the cover letter accompanying their abstract. Please follow the SCS’s instructions for the format of individual abstracts: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/guidelines-authors-abstracts. The submission of an abstract represents a commitment to attend the 2020 meeting should the abstract be accepted. No papers will be read in absentia and the SLA is unable to provide funding for travel to Washington, D.C.

Conference: Processions: Urban Ritual in Byzantium and Neighboring Lands

Byzantine Studies Symposium, Dumbarton Oaks Music Room, Washington DC, USA, 12-13 April 2019

Military, civic, and religious processions were hallmarks of the ancient and medieval world; they continued into the Renaissance and, indeed, continue to this day. Yet the Byzantine procession has not yet been subjected to any synthetic, historicizing, contextualizing, or comparative examination.

Understanding processions is critical for our appreciation of how urban space worked and was manipulated in the Middle Ages. For the 2019 Dumbarton Oaks Byzantine Symposium, speakers will examine texts, artifacts, and images in order to develop a new understanding of medieval urban life across multiple social registers. For example, records of processions show us what kinds of public behavior were acceptable, and when, and where. Studying processions introduces us to new protagonists as well, for processions involve audiences as well as participants, and groups hitherto virtually invisible, such as the team of people who prepared for the event by decorating the streets, will be brought to light. The Byzantine commitment to processions is striking in terms of the resources and time allocated: there were as many as two processions a week in Constantinople, many involving the patriarch and the emperor. In the Latin West, the Crusader States, and in the Fatimid, Ottoman, and Muscovite worlds, by comparison, processions occurred far less frequently: the procession was significantly more important to the Byzantines than to their neighbors and successors. The comparative study of Byzantine processions to be offered by the speakers at the symposium will reveal how the Byzantines operated in a complex global network defined by local contexts, how the Byzantines positioned themselves within this network, and the nature of the Byzantine legacy to the Islamic, Catholic, and Orthodox inheritors of their culture.

For further infromation, see https://www.doaks.org/research/byzantine/scholarly-activities/processions.