Job: Museum Director, Dumbarton Oaks

Dumbarton Oaks, Washington D.C., USA

Dumbarton Oaks is a Harvard research institute, museum, library, and garden in Washington, D.C. Since 1940 the institute and library have supported research and learning internationally in Byzantine, Garden and Landscape, and Pre-Columbian studies. The historic garden designed by Beatrix Farrand was voted among the ten best in the world by National Geographic and features occasional art installations by contemporary artists.

The museum has world-class collections of Byzantine and Pre-Columbian art and select works of European art. It is open to the public free of charge six days/week. Notable architecture on campus includes the Philip Johnson Pavilion that houses the Pre-Columbian Collection. The museum has close ties to local and Harvard communities and engages scholars and visitors from all over the world through exhibitions, gallery talks, and class visits. Dumbarton Oaks is a vibrant home of the humanities with an overarching mission of communicating the value of culture and advanced research to the broadest possible public.

The museum director will lead the museum team in planning and delivering innovative exhibits in a highly collaborative environment. The director will oversee long-term exhibition planning, budget, and all aspects of museum operations. The ideal candidate will combine knowledge of one area of the Dumbarton Oaks collections with strong leadership and administrative skills. The incumbent will join our community at an exciting time of expansion of both our academic and public programs and will contribute to the ongoing Dumbarton Oaks Access Initiative by helping us design and deliver free and open access to the collections through digital and educational initiatives.

Duties and Responsibilities:
• Oversees all aspects of museum operations including administration, budget, and staff.
• Oversees exhibition planning and delivery, leading the museum team and collaborating with other departments as well as external partners.
• Oversees handling,conservation, insurance, and loans of collections.
• Collaborates closely with other departments on building maintenance and security; outreach; and planning and delivery of public programs
• Oversees the transition to an updated collections management system.
• Oversees the digital and print publication of museum collection and exhibition catalogues.
• Leads the overhaul of the museum digital and web presence, including the provision of open access catalogues and high-resolution images of the museum collections.
• Engages actively with new scholarship relating to the Dumbarton Oaks collections, as well as with up-to-date museum practices and initiatives.
• Mentors fellows and interns from Harvard University as part of Dumbarton Oaks’ skillbuilding programs for early-career humanists.
• Maintains coordination with Harvard University policies as appropriate.
• Performs special projects and duties as required by the Director and Executive Director.

Supervisory responsibilities:
• Manage a team of ten full-time museum professionals.

Basic qualifications:
• Master’s degree in art history or museum studies required
• Minimum six years’ museum management experience, including responsibility for a professional staff and budget.

Additional qualifications:
• Advanced degree in any area of the museum’s collections preferred.
• PhD preferred.
• Proven administrative and leadership ability, ideally in a museum setting.
• Strong data and collection management skills.
• Excellent communication skills; collegiality, initiative, and versatility in a fast-paced environment that is committed to the highest standards of museum and scholarly practice.

The position remains open until filled. Details regarding application can be found at https://www.doaks.org/about/employment/museum-director-1.

Summer School: Dumbarton Oaks/HMML Syriac and Armenian Summer School 2020

Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota, USA, 13 July-7 August 2020

Deadline: 15 February 2020

Dumbarton Oaks in collaboration with the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML) announces two intensive four-week language courses: Intermediate Syriac and Introduction to Classical Armenian.

The programme, sponsored and funded by Dumbarton Oaks, will be hosted at HMML, located on the campus of Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota. The summer school will run from July 13 to August 7, 2020. The audience is doctoral students or recent PhDs who can demonstrate a need for Syriac or Armenian in their research.

For those applying for Introductory Classical Armenian, no prior knowledge is expected but some preparation as directed by the instructors will be required before arrival. Those with significant prior study of Aremenian (e.g., a semester-long class) will not be considered. Following this intensive course, students will be able to continue reading on their own or to enter reading courses at other institutions.

The courses will also include an introduction to paleography and to the study and use of manuscripts, especially those now available in the vHMML Reading Room from HMML’s vast collection of digitized manuscripts.

Approximately ten places will be available for each course. Costs for tuition, housing, and meals will be covered by Dumbarton Oaks. The selected participants will be responsible for their own travel costs to and from Saint John’s University. The deadline for applications is February 15, 2020.

For further information, see http://hmml.org/events/summer-courses/.

Fellowship: Byzantine Studies Postdoctoral Fellowship 2020-21

Medieval Institute University of Notre Dame, IN, USA

Deadline: 1 February 2020

Following substantial investment in the area of Byzantine Studies at the University of Notre Dame, including the acquisition of the Milton V. Anastos Library of Byzantine Civilization and generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Medieval Institute at the University of Notre Dame is delighted to invite applicants for a nine-month Postdoctoral Fellowship in Byzantine Studies. This fellowship is designed for junior scholars with a completed doctorate whose research deals with some aspect of the Byzantine world. The fellow is expected to pursue promising research towards scholarly publication and/or the development of new subject areas. This Fellowship is open to qualified applicants in all fields and sub-disciplines of Byzantine Studies, such as history (including its auxiliary disciplines), archaeology, art history, literature, theology, and liturgical studies, as well as the study of Byzantium’s interactions with neighboring cultures. The fellowship holder will pursue research in residence at the University of Notre Dame’s famed Medieval Institute during the academic year.

The intent of this Fellowship is to enable its holder to do innovative research drawing on the rich resources held in the Milton V. Anastos Collection, the Medieval Institute, and the Hesburgh Library more broadly. This may include the completion of book manuscripts and articles, work on text editions, or the development of new trajectories of research in one of the aforementioned fields. The Fellowship carries no teaching responsibilities, but the fellow will have the opportunity to participate in the multidisciplinary activities of Notre Dame faculty related to Byzantium, Eastern Christianity, and the history of the Levant. The Fellow will be provided with a private workspace in the Medieval Institute, enjoy full library and computer privileges, and have access to all the Institute’s research tools.

In addition, towards the conclusion of the fellowship period the fellow’s work will be at the center of a workshop organized within the framework of the Byzantine Studies Seminar. Senior scholars, chosen in cooperation with the Medieval Institute, will be invited for this event treating the fellow’s subject matter. The senior scholars will discuss draft versions of the fellow’s book manuscript or articles or discuss the further development of ongoing research projects.

Qualifications: Byzantine Studies fellows must hold a Ph.D. from an internationally recognized institution. The Ph.D. must be in hand by the beginning of the fellowship term.

Application Instructions: Applicants should submit a letter of application (cover letter), a project proposal of no more than 2500 words, a current C.V., and three letters of recommendation. Applicants will also complete an informational sheet in Interfolio. To apply, see here.

Merchants and Markets in Late Antiquity

Society for Classical Studies Annual Meeting, Chicago, USA, 7-10 January 2021

Deadline: 7 February 2020

We are inviting the submission of abstracts for the organizer-refereed panel ‘Merchants and Markets in Late Antiquity’ at the 2021 annual meeting of the Society for Classical Studies. This annual meeting will be held in Chicago from January 7-10, 2021. The deadline for submitting an abstract is February 7, 2020.

A social, cultural, and economic history of work and trade in the later Roman empire remains to be written. Recent years have seen a renewed interest in labour, professions, commerce, and their organization during the Imperial period, while the last two decades have been a remarkably productive time for the study of the Roman economy in general. The resultant scholarship has presented new approaches which have greatly advanced our understanding of both structural and specific characteristics of the economy. The most influential of these has been the adoption of New Institutional Economics (e.g. Scheidel, Morris, and Saller 2007), but there has also been a steady stream of microeconomic studies focusing on the social elements of economic activity (Terpstra 2013; Venticinque 2016; Hawkins 2016) and sociocultural histories of work and professions (e.g. Verboven and Laes 2016). Some of this scholarship has extended into Late Antiquity, though the most influential work remains Wickham’s magisterial Framing the Early Middle Ages (2006). Nevertheless, scholarship on the later Roman world has not yet sought to integrate the economic theories that have reconditioned the way of writing the socio-economic history of the early Roman Empire.

The future of late Roman social and economic history lies in utilizing and adapting innovative approaches to the Roman economy for the study of Late Antiquity. The institutional change for which this period is known offers plentiful opportunities to consider how individual economic actors were affected by structural, religious, and political changes, and the field is ripe for a re-evaluation of the intersection between social norms and the economy.

This panel hopes to bring together scholars from a wide range of subjects and backgrounds, and to solicit abstracts for papers considering a variety of issues and addressing such diverse questions as:

· What awareness did local merchants, craftsmen, and transporters have of wider economic change in Late Antiquity?
· What strategies did these individuals develop to mitigate risk and resolve economic challenges, and are the strategies of Late Antiquity fundamentally different in some way from those used in earlier or later periods?
· Can we speak of market integration or disintegration in Late Antiquity?
· What were the outcomes of state institutional and structural changes to the economy at local and regional levels?
· What effects did the development of new legal and fiscal systems have on the social and political lives of merchants and craftsmen?

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be submitted as email attachments to info@classicalstudies.org by February 7, 2020. The title of the email should be the title of the panel. Abstracts should contain a title of the paper, but should not have any information regarding the identity of the submitter. All abstracts for papers will be reviewed anonymously. For enquiries, please email Jane Sancinito (jsancini@oberlin.edu) or John Fabiano (john.fabiano@utoronto.ca).

Job: Faculty position for Liturgical Theology

St Vladimir’s Seminary, New York, USA

Saint Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary, founded in 1938 and dedicated to student learning, research, and community life, invites distinguished candidates to apply for a faculty position for Liturgical Theology. We seek an assistant, associate, or full professor.

Along with its primary mission to educate future clergy for all Orthodox Christian jurisdictions in North America and beyond—exemplified through the pan-Orthodox vision of one of the school’s first deans, Father Georges Florovsky—St Vladimir’s Seminary has set ambitious benchmarks for research excellence and academic productivity. The relatively small faculty has an excellent track record of research awards and publications with leading university presses and journals, and the new professor of Liturgical Theology will be expected to contribute and improve upon this strength. Candidates should possess a reasonable publication record, according to their respective academic career thus far, and an ambitious research agenda commensurate with the rank at which they are hired.

The standard teaching load is two classes every semester. Successful candidates will teach a range of subjects at graduate level for the Seminary’s various degree programs: MDiv, MA, ThM, and DMin. As one who will occupy one of the Seminary’s most prominent faculty positions—following in the footsteps of Fr Alexander Schmemann, among others—the candidate will be asked to stimulate research within the faculty, effectively represent the Seminary to outside constituencies, and strengthen recruitment efforts for our programs, in addition to teaching assigned courses and playing a vital role in the day-to-day academic administration of the institution. A record of professional leadership in the candidate’s field is desirable.

The successful candidate will demonstrate a strong commitment to the Orthodox mission, especially Apologetics, in North America and beyond. Saint Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary is one the most famous Orthodox theological institutions for higher education in the English-speaking world. Located in Yonkers, NY, the Seminary is a part of the New York Theological Consortium (Fordham University, General Theological Seminary, et al.), and is on its way to becoming an Accredited Clinical Pastoral Education (ACPE) center.

All applications must be emailed to ApplicationLT@svots.edu and include a

· cover letter
· curriculum vitae
· statement of research agenda
· two syllabi
· contact information for three letters of reference.

Questions about this position should be directed to the Academic Dean: Dr Alex Tudorie, St Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary, 575 Scarsdale Rd, Yonkers, NY 10707. Contact email: IATudorie@svots.edu.

Scholarship: Two Fully-funded PhD Scholarships in Liturgical Studies, University of Notre Dame

University of Notre Dame, IN, USA

Deadline: 2 January 2020

The Graduate School at the University of Notre Dame accepts up to two, fully-funded PhD students per year in Liturgical Studies. The program in Liturgical Studies integrates three sub-disciplines: Liturgical History; Liturgical Theology; Ritual Studies.

The program offers a wide range of research opportunities with particular strengths in early and late antique Christian ritual and material culture, medieval liturgy, Byzantine Christianity, manuscript studies, contemporary liturgical theology, and ritual studies. Recent dissertations have included topics on ritual at the Second Temple, architecture and liturgy in medieval Salisbury, liturgy and life in Crusader Jerusalem, ritual in Igbo culture, imperial rites for commemorating earthquakes in late antique Constantinople, and liturgy and identity in the California Missions.

The Liturgical Studies program was founded in 1947 as the first graduate program in the Department of Theology and quickly grew to become an international center for the study of liturgy. Pioneers in the discipline who have taught at Notre Dame include Josef Jungmann, Louis Bouyer, Robert Taft, Paul Bradshaw, and many others. The program is currently comprised of seven faculty members and represents one of the largest concentrations of liturgical scholars at one place in the world.

In addition to its core strengths, Liturgical Studies offers a variety of opportunities for research collaboration with other institutions at Notre Dame, including the Medieval Institute, the Program in Sacred Music, other departments at the university (esp. History, Anthropology and Sociology) and other programs within the Theology Department, including Christianity and Judaism in Antiquity (CJA), the History of Christianity (HC), and Systematic Theology (ST). The Hesburgh Libraries system has extensive holdings in theology and one of the nation’s largest collections in medieval and Byzantine studies, including the Milton Anastos Collection. The Theology Department also offers a broad range of ancient languages, including courses in Greek, Latin, Syriac, Hebrew, Coptic, Armenian and Ge’ez, with additional opportunities for studying Georgian, Slavonic, and Jewish Aramaic.

All applications must be submitted to the Graduate School by January 2, 2020. More information and a link to the online application may be found at https://theology.nd.edu/graduate-programs/ph-d/.

Job: Assistant or Associate Professorship in Medieval History (c. 500 – c. 1400)

University of Tennessee-Knoxville, USA

Deadline: 15 November 2019

The History Department at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville seeks to make a full-time, tenure-track appointment at the rank of Assistant or Associate in Medieval History (c. 500—c. 1400). The appointment will begin fall semester 2020. Ph.D. required at the time of appointment.

The field of specialization is open. We encourage applications from scholars whose fields, thematic focuses and geographic areas complement our department’s existing expertise in European and Mediterranean history. Preference will be given to candidates with a significant record of publication and demonstrated excellence in teaching. The successful candidate will teach both graduate and undergraduate courses, including surveys in Western Civilization and/or World History, more advanced specialized courses, and undergraduate and graduate research seminars, and will participate actively in Marco, UTK’s Medieval and Renaissance Studies Institute. The Knoxville campus is seeking candidates who have the ability to contribute in meaningful ways to the diversity and intercultural goals of the University.

A complete application will include a letter of application, curriculum vitae, three letters of recommendation, and an article-length writing sample. Materials should be submitted via https://apply.interfolio.com/68057.

Review of applications will begin November 15, 2019 and continue until an appointment is made.

Conference: Byzantine Missions: Meaning, Nature, and Extent

Dumbarton Oaks, Washington D.C., USA, 24-25 April 2020

Though closely connected with the study of conversion and Christianization in the premodern era, the history of Christian missions has received little attention in recent scholarship. The recipients of Christian faith—individuals, nations, or social groups—and the processes of integrating the new religion have continued to attract analysis, but the agents of religious transformation have been relatively understudied, especially beyond the boundaries of medieval western Europe.

The symposium aims to illumine the inner motifs that characterized Byzantine missions, the changing incentives that inspired their missionizing, and the nature of their missionary activity; and ultimately to better understand how they perceived the universal claim of their empire and their church. At the same time, we hope to throw light on the broader religious dynamics of the medieval world.

Symposiarchs: Sergey Ivanov (National Research University, Higher School of Economics, Moscow) and Andrea Sterk (University of Minnesota)

For details, see https://www.doaks.org/research/byzantine/scholarly-activities/byzantine-missions-meaning-nature-and-extent

Exhibition: Ornament: Fragments of Byzantine Fashion

Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, D.C., USA, 10 September-2019 5 January 2020

Excavations in the nineteenth century unearthed scores of the ornate dress textiles which wrapped the people of medieval Egypt in their graves. Ornament: Fragments of Byzantine Fashion brings together complete tunics, parts of garments, and contemporary replicas of ancient dress to evoke the fashions of this now lost world. These textiles often preserved traces of their wearers in the forms of folds and stains, providing researchers with important information about the people buried in these garments. But alongside these bodily vestiges, the decoration of these textiles reveals much about the sophistication and aesthetics of the period in which they were crafted. Often cut into pieces by dealers at the time they were sold on the art market, these fragments survive in an incomplete state that has complicated our understanding of Byzantine dress practices.

The exhibition also celebrates the publication of a digital catalogue of our textiles, which will appear on the Dumbarton Oaks website to coincide with the exhibition.
Programming includes a Study Day for graduate students and a series of Saturday gallery talks. More information will be posted here: https://www.doaks.org/visit/museum/exhibitions/ornament

Conference: The Insular Worlds of Byzantium

Byzantine Studies Colloquium

Dumbarton Oaks, Washington D.C., USA, 15 November 20119

Byzantine islands have been largely considered marginal to the dramatic political, social, and economic changes the Byzantine heartland experienced in the seventh century and at the onset of Arab expansion in the eastern Mediterranean. Major islands, such as Sicily, Sardinia, Malta, and the Balearics, were lost forever. Others, like Crete and Cyprus, remained in flux until they were briefly reclaimed by Byzantium in tenth century before coming under Latin control during the Crusades. Contrary to the perspectives offered by written sources (Byzantine, Arab, and Western), which for the most part dismiss them as marginal spaces, places of exile, or military outposts along maritime frontiers, islands constitute the best examples of the transformative adaptability of Byzantine society during periods of volatility and transition. Instead of decline and abandonment, archaeological work and results point to the existence of active communities, local and regional economic exchanges, and cultural continuities and interconnections during the period between the seventh century and the fall of Constantinople to the Crusaders in 1204.

Speakers will address the topic of Byzantine islands through case studies viewed in their broader Mediterranean and comparative contexts. The exploration of islands as hubs where Byzantine, Islamic, and Western European cultures encountered and influenced the local political, economic, and social structures will permit new insights into the networks of island societies and their legacies. Not only were islands located along commercial shipping routes, but, as spaces of adaptive economic activities and social strategies that were molded by military and political realities, they presented unique opportunities for cultural interconnections. In this context, the “Insular Worlds of Byzantium” will provide new and revised perspectives on the Byzantine Mediterranean and beyond.

Speakers:
• Nikolas Bakirtzis, The Cyprus Institute
• William Caraher, University of North Dakota
• Salvatore Cosentino, Università di Bologna
• Sarah Davis-Secord, University of New Mexico
• Michael Decker, University of South Florida
• Jonathan Shea, Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection
• Joanita Vroom, Universiteit Leiden
• Luca Zavagno, Bilkent Üniversitesi