Call for Papers: Late Antique Textualities

Society for Classical Studies, Washington, D.C., USA, 2-5 January 2020

Deadline: 23 February 2019

Sponsored by the Society for Late Antiquity
Organizer: Colin Whiting, American School of Classical Studies at Athens

In Latin, textus can mean a piece of weaving. Late antiquity is well thought of as a text or a collocation of texts in which many strands are woven together— strands of the old (the Classical past, old genres, persisting aspects of material culture) and strands of the new (Christianity, new or hybridized written genres, new or hybridized elements in material culture or the built environment). At the meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in Washington, D.C., January 2–5, 2020, the Society for Late Antiquity will sponsor a session on the various textualities in late antiquity.

We are looking for papers on textuality in either written texts or material culture. Papers can consider issues of textuality in late-ancient written texts, e.g., language, intertextuality with prior written texts (pagan or Christian), or even genre. Potential panelists could also propose papers that consider textuality in material culture or the built environment, e.g., aesthetics, building styles, or methods that weave together old and new. We also encourage prospective panelists to construe the term textuality broadly and propose papers that transcend and/or question the options enumerated here.

Abstracts for papers requiring a maximum of 20 minutes to deliver should be sent no later than February 23, 2019 by email attachment to Colin Whiting. All submissions will be judged anonymously by two referees. Prospective panelists must be members in good standing of the SCS at the time of submission and must include their membership number in the cover letter accompanying their abstract. Please follow the SCS’s instructions for the format of individual abstracts here. The submission of an abstract represents a commitment to attend the 2020 meeting should the abstract be accepted. No papers will be read in absentia and the SLA is unable to provide funding for travel to Washington, D.C.

Call for Papers: Medieval Italy

7th Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Saint Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri, USA, 17-19 June 2019

Deadline: 31 December 2018

We are looking for additional papers and sessions on topics relating to medieval Italy. Current session proposals in need of additional papers include:

– Foundations of Venice in the Early Modern Middle Ages
– Byzantine Influence in Southern Italy (or Exarchate of Ravenna)
– Conflict and Commerce in Northern Italy
– The Communes of Medieval Italy
– Italy in the Medieval Mediterranean

Proposals for papers or sessions beyond those mentioned above are also encouraged. The submission deadline for both sessions proposals and individual papers is December 31.

For more information on the conference and submission instructions, see the conference website at: https://www.smrs-slu.org/.

For questions specifically related to papers and sessions on Medieval Italy, please contact Philip Mazero (phillip.mazero@slu.edu) or Matthew E. Parker (matthew.parker@slu.edu)

Studentship: Two fully-funded PhD positions in Liturgical Studies

University of Notre Dame, IN, USA

Deadline: 2 January 2019

The Graduate School at the University of Notre Dame accepts up to two, funded PhD candidates per year in Liturgical Studies. The program in Liturgical Studies integrates three sub-disciplines: Liturgical History; Liturgical Theology; Ritual Studies.

The program offers a wide range of research opportunities with particular strengths in early and late antique Christian ritual and material culture, medieval liturgy, Byzantine Christianity, manuscript studies, modern liturgical theology, and ritual studies. Recent dissertations have included topics on ritual at the Second Temple, architecture and liturgy in medieval Salisbury, liturgy and life in Crusader Jerusalem, ritual in Igbo culture, imperial rites for commemorating earthquakes in late antique Constantinople, and ritual and identity in the California Missions.

The Liturgical Studies program was founded in 1947 as the first graduate program in the Department of Theology and quickly grew to become an international center for the study of liturgy. Pioneers in the discipline who have taught at Notre Dame include Josef Jungmann, Louis Bouyer, Robert Taft, Paul Bradshaw, and many others. The program is currently comprised of seven faculty members and represents one of the largest concentrations of liturgical scholars at one place in the world.

In addition to its core strengths, Liturgical Studies offers a variety of opportunities for research collaboration with other institutions at Notre Dame, including the Medieval Institute, the Program in Sacred Music, other departments at the university (esp. History, Anthropology and Sociology) and other programs within the Theology Department, including Christianity and Judaism in Antiquity (CJA), the History of Christianity (HC), and Systematic Theology (ST). The Hesburgh Libraries system has extensive holdings in theology and one of the nation’s largest collections in medieval and Byzantine studies, including the Milton Anastos Collection. The Theology Department also offers a broad range of ancient languages, including courses in Greek, Latin, Syriac, Hebrew, Coptic, Armenian and Ge’ez, with additional opportunities for studying Georgian, Slavonic, and Jewish Aramaic.

All applications must be submitted to the Graduate School by January 2, 2019. More information and a link to the online application may be found here.

Conference: Archaeological Institute of America Annual Meeting

San Diego, CA, USA, 3-6 January 2019

The Medieval and Post-Medieval Archaeology Interest Group of the Archaeological Institute of America is sponsoring two colloquia at this year’s annual meeting, to be held January 3-6, 2019, in San Diego, CA.

Saturday, January 5, 1:45 – 4:45 pm
The Medieval Countryside: An Archaeological Perspective (6I)
Organized by Effie Athanassopoulos, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

•Archaeological approaches and settlement systems in Medieval central Greece – Athanasios K. Vionis, University of Cyprus
•Archaeological Survey and Understanding the Rural Landscape in Byzantine Greece: Some Specific Examples – Timothy E. Gregory, Ohio State University, and Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory, Australian Archaeological Institute in Athens
•Aegean Landscapes of the Early Middle Ages: New Perspectives from Naxos – Sam Turner, Newcastle University, and Jim Crow, University of Edinburgh
•The Domestic and Built Environment of a Byzantine Village – Mark Pawlowski, UCLA
•The Medieval Countryside at a Regional Scale in the Western Argolid and Northeastern Peloponnesus – Dimitri Nakassis, University of Colorado, Sarah James, University of Colorado, Scott Gallimore, Wilfrid Laurier University, and William Caraher, University of North Dakota
•Remarks on Surface Survey Research in the Eastern Peloponnese – Anastasia G. Yangaki, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Greece
•What Happens when Historians and Archaeologists talk to each other: the Avkat Archaeological Project – Hugh Elton, Trent University, John Haldon, Princeton University, and James Newhard, College of Charleston

Sunday, January 6, 8:00 – 11:00 am
Craft Production in the Medieval and Post-Medieval Mediterranean (7B)
Organized by Fotini Kondyli, University of Virginia, and Lucie Wall Stylianopoulos, University of Virginia

•Age-old Traditions Coming of Age: Metal Production, Communities, and Landscape in the Medieval Balkans – Georgios Makris, Princeton University
•Embroidery Workshops in the Ottoman Empire – Michalis Lychounas, Hellenic Ministry of Culture, Ephorate of Antiquities of Kavala
•The “Stone of Athienou”: An Ethnoarchaeological Study of Stone Workers in Central Cyprus – P. Nick Kardulias, College of Wooster
•Craft Production in an ‘Open-Trade Zone’: Metal Work in Late Medieval/Early Modern Aegean – Nikos Kontogiannis, Koç University
•Connections among Craft Communities in the Late Medieval Mediterranean: New Considerations on Patterns of use of the Naples Yellow Pigment – Florence Liard, Université Bordeaux-Montaigne, France
•On the Transfer of Knowledge in Ivories of the Medieval Mediterranean – Anthony Cutler, Penn State University

For more about the AIA Annual Meeting and information about how to register, visit https://www.archaeological.org/annualmeeting.
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Fellowship: Baker-Nord Fellowship in the Humanities

Case Western Reserve University, Ohio, USA

Deadline: 31 January 2019

The Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities at Case Western Reserve University seeks applicants for the inaugural offering of the “The Virginia and Walter Nord Fellowship in the Humanities.”

The purpose of the BNC Post-Doctoral Fellows Program is to support research in the humanities by providing scholars in the early stages of their careers with the time and resources necessary to advance their work. During their time at the Baker-Nord Center, Fellows will pursue individual or collaborative research and writing for the full academic year. An essential feature of the program is that Fellows make intellectual contributions to the CWRU community, through their participation in workshops, lectures and courses. Fellows will be affiliated with one or more of the humanities departments represented on the BNC Steering Committee: Art History and Art, Classics, English, History, Modern Languages and Literatures, Music, Philosophy, Religious Studies, and Theater. BNC Post-Doctoral Fellows will be expected to offer an undergraduate course during the spring of their fellowship year, following consultation with their host department

Further information here.

Call for Papers: “Scribal Habits in Middle Eastern Manuscripts” Workshop

Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey, USA, 9-11 May 2019

Deadline: 15 January 2019

Most scholars who employ manuscripts in their research tend to focus on the literary content itself. But what about the role of the scribe who typically remains at the periphery of research? How can we, in the words of the NT textual critic James Royse, “virtually look over the scribe’s shoulder” to understand the process by which our manuscripts were produced. The aim of this workshop is to bring together scholars from various disciplines to study the individuals who produced our manuscripts and how they shaped the transmission of literary texts they copied.

Topics may include:
· The qualities, habits and skills of the scribe.
· Typology of changes made by scribes .
· The visual features of the MSS as produced by scribes.
· How can scribal habits help us reconstruct texts?
· Why do scribes deviate from their exemplars?
· How are peculiar readings produced?
· What does the scribe do when (s)he spots an error?
· What is the right spelling of a word and how are orthographic variants produced?
· Is it time for a new paragraph?
· Second-hand scribes (e.g. vocalizers, dotters, and commentators).
· Extra-textual elements in manuscripts

This workshop will focus on Middle Eastern manuscripts written in Hebrew, Syriac, Arabic, Persian, Armenian, Coptic and other languages. Scholars interested in participating may send via email a proposal between 750 and 1,000 words. Proposals are to focus on the scribe and scribal habits (i.e. not a study of the literary text itself). Comparative analyses across traditions is encouraged but not required.

Submission deadline is January 15, 2019. Submissions are to be sent via email directly to George A. Kiraz at gkiraz@ias.edu.

Scholars are expected to fund their travel to/from and accommodation in Princeton. The Institute will provide meals and a conference celebratory dinner. Speakers will be invited to contribute to a collected volume on an agreed-upon theme.

Call for Papers: Syriac Worlds: Interactions, Exchanges, Contributions

Brown University, Providence, RI, USA, 16-19 June  2019

Deadline: 2 January 2019

The Eighth North American Syriac Symposium will convene at Brown University on June 16-19, 2019. Held every four years since 1991, the North American Syriac Symposium brings together scholars and students for exchange and discussion on a wide variety of topics related to the language, literature, and cultural history of Syriac Christianity, extending chronologically from the first centuries CE to the present day and geographically from Syriac Christianity’s homeland in the Middle East to South India, China, and the worldwide diaspora.

We invite paper proposals for the 2019 Brown Syriac Symposium on the them of Syriac Worlds: Interactions, Exchanges, Contributions.

Throughout its long history, Syriac Christianity has flourished in the midst of other languages, religions, cultures, and societies. However turbulent its circumstances, Syriac has enabled distinctive articulations and cultural expressions for its speakers. Moreover, not only have there been constant interactions, but Syriac has been an active medium of exchange. Contributions, borrowings, adaptations, and innovations have characterized the literary, material, philological, and cultural productions of Syriac speakers from the start. This Symposium welcomes proposals for scholarly papers on all topics that address Syriac in any of its historical time periods, within this broad theme.

Proposals may be submitted either for individual papers or as part of a proposed panel. Individual presentations must be limited to 20 minutes, plus 5 minutes of discussion time. Please submit contact information for the presenter(s) and an abstract of 250-350 words. Those wishing to propose a panel of 3 to 4 papers (4 papers maximum) on a specific theme must submit a separate abstract for each presentation, a title for the panel, and full contact information for all presenters and the session moderator.

All proposals should be submitted electronically to nasyriacsymposium@gmail.com on or before January 2, 2019. Notification of acceptances of paper and panel proposlas will be made in early February, with a view to publishing the program in early March.

For further information, see the conference website.

Call for Papers: Seventh Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies

17-19 June 2019, Saint Louis University, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Deadline: 31 December 2018

The Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies provides a convenient summer venue in North America for scholars in all disciplines to present papers, organize sessions, participate in roundtables, and engage in interdisciplinary discussion. The goal of the symposium is to promote serious scholarly investigation of the medieval and early modern worlds.

We invite proposals for papers, sessions, and roundtables on all topics and in all disciplines of medieval and early modern studies. Proposals from learned societies and scholarly associations are particularly welcome. The deadline for proposals submissions is December 31.

The plenary speakers for this year will be John J. Contreni, of Purdue University, and Maureen C. Miller, of the University of California, Berkeley.

The Symposium is held on the beautiful midtown campus of Saint Louis University, hosted by the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. On-campus housing options include affordable, air-conditioned apartments and a luxurious boutique hotel. Inexpensive dorm meal plans are available.

All sessions take place in state-of-the-art classrooms and auditoriums with complete audiovisual facilities. All sessions, events, meals, and housing are located within easy walking distance of each other. A rich variety of restaurants, bars, and cultural venues are also only a short walk away.

All sessions are 90 minutes long. A variety of session formats are welcome. Preference will be given to organized sessions that involve participants from multiple institutions.

For further information, see the conference website.