Grant: Dumbarton Oaks One Month Research Awards

Dumbarton Oaks, Washington DC, USA

Deadline: 1 March 2020

Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection offers One-Month Research Awards of $3,000 to scholars holding the PhD or other relevant terminal degree (e.g., MLA for Garden and Landscape studies applicants) and working on research projects in Byzantine studies, Pre-Columbian studies, Garden and Landscape studies, or related fields. The awards were established to make the intellectual community as well as the library, rare book, garden, and museum resources of Dumbarton Oaks more widely available to a broader range of scholars for shorter terms and with some flexibility in starting dates. Awards are intended especially for those who might not be able to avail themselves of a longer-term fellowship at Dumbarton Oaks, or scholars in related disciplines who seek greater exposure to our fields of study.

For full details, see https://www.doaks.org/research/fellowships-and-awards/one-month-research-awards.

Summer School: 2020 Byzantine Greek Summer School

Dumbarton Oaks, Washington D.C., USA, 29 June-24 July 2020

Deadline: 1 February 2020

Intensive four-week course in medieval Greek and introduction to paleography and Byzantine book culture. Approximately ten places will be available, with priority going to students without ready access to similar courses at local or regional institutions. Applications due February 1, 2020.

The principal course will be a daily 1½-hour session devoted to the translation of sample Byzantine texts. Each week, texts will be selected from a different genre, e.g., historiography, hagiography, poetry, and epistolography. Two afternoons a week, hour-long sessions on paleography will be held. In addition, each student will receive a minimum of one hour per week of individual tutorial. Approximately eleven hours per week will be devoted to formal classroom instruction. In the remaining hours of the week, students will prepare their assignments.

Students will also have the opportunity to study inscribed objects in the Byzantine Collection, and view facsimiles of manuscripts in the Dumbarton Oaks Rare Books Collection, as well as original manuscripts in the Byzantine Collection. Any extra time may be used for personal research in the Dumbarton Oaks library, but support for the summer school is intended first and foremost for study of Byzantine Greek language and texts.

For full details, see https://www.doaks.org/research/byzantine/scholarly-activities/2020-byzantine-greek-summer-school.

Fellowship: Princeton Hellenic Studies Postdoctoral Fellowships

Princeton University, NJ, USA

Deadline: 8 January 2020

The Seeger Center for Hellenic Studies at Princeton University invites applications for two postdoctoral fellowships: (1) The Hannah Seeger Davis Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Hellenic Studies and (2) The Mary Seeger O’Boyle Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Hellenic Studies. These fellowships are awarded annually on a competitive basis. Scholars in all disciplines of the humanities and social sciences are eligible to apply.

Terms of the fellowship: Fellows will be appointed as Postdoctoral Research Associates for September 2020 through June 2021, conducting research on a full-time basis. There is also the possibility for renewal for a second full year (July 2021 through June 2022), based on funding and satisfactory performance. Fellows who are renewed may be offered the opportunity to teach or co-teach a course during their second year. Teaching opportunities will be subject to sufficient course enrollments and must be approved for the Dean of the Faculty. When teaching, fellows will hold the additional rank of Lecturer. Fellows who are renewed for a second year have the possibility of spending up to two months at the Princeton Athens Center conducting research during Summer 2021.(June-July 2021)

These fellowships are intended for scholars in Hellenic Studies, with a special emphasis on Modern Greek Studies, Byzantine Studies, or Late Antique Studies, including their relation to the Classical tradition. The goal of this postdoctoral research fellowship program is to advance the scholarship of outstanding Hellenists at an early stage of their career and thus to strengthen the field of post-Classical Greek Studies in the United States and abroad.

For full details, see https://hellenic.princeton.edu/opportunities/postdoctoral-research-fellowships.

Call for Papers: Eighth Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Saint Louis University, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA, 15-17 June 2020

Deadline: 31 December 2019

The deadline for proposal submissions for the Eighth Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies (June 15-17, 2020) is fast approaching, so get your abstracts ready! We invite proposals for papers, complete sessions, and roundtables. Any topics regarding the scholarly investigation of the medieval and early modern world are welcome. Papers are normally twenty minutes each and sessions are scheduled for ninety minutes. Scholarly organizations are especially encouraged to sponsor proposals for complete sessions. The goal of the Symposium is to promote serious scholarly investigation into all topics and in all disciplines of medieval and early modern studies. The Symposium is also host to the 47th Annual Saint Louis Conference on Manuscript Studies, the longest-running annual conference in North America. Opportunities for undergraduate submissions are also available via the Tirones Mediaevales sessions – see the website for more details.

The plenary speakers for this year will be David Abulafia, of Cambridge University, and Barbara Rosenwein, of Loyola University, Chicago.

The deadline for all submissions is December 31, 2019. Late submissions will be considered if space is available. Decisions will be made in January and the final program will be published in February.

For more information or to submit your proposal online go to: Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

Job: Editor, ‘Studies in Late Antiquity’

Deadline: 10 February 2020

University of California Press is seeking applicants for the position of Editor of Studies in Late Antiquity. The new editorship will begin in January 2021 following the end of founding Editor, Beth DePalma Digeser’s term.

Launched in 2015, Studies in Late Antiquity (SLA) is an online-only quarterly journal that serves as an international forum for innovation and reflection on global Late Antiquity (150-750 CE). Primary points of interest include interconnections between the Mediterranean and Africa, Iran, Arabia, the Baltic, Scandinavia, the British Isles, China, India and all of Asia, as well as disrupting the assumed connection between the late ancient/Christian Mediterranean and modern, western Europe. In addition to the peer-reviewed articles of original research, the journal also publishes invited essays, book reviews, and exhibition reviews.

Applicants should have a distinguished scholarly record in the field. Journal editorial experience is preferred but not required. Applicants should possess strong organizational and management skills, the ability to work with others, and a commitment to the journal’s mission to publish high-quality, relevant, and engaging scholarship.

University of California Press provides the Editor with a modest annual stipend of financial support.

Primary responsibilities of the Editor include:

• Developing and implementing a strategic editorial vision and goals for the journal
• Appointing editorial board members and identifying appropriate peer reviewers
• Making final decisions on manuscripts
• Ensuring smooth editorial workflows and processes
• Adhering to the Publisher’s production schedule for the journal
• Working collaboratively with journal stakeholders on journal promotion and building a reliable pipeline of high quality submissions

UC Press endeavors to have the new Editor appointed by May 2020 to ensure a smooth editorial transition.

Applicants should send a letter of application including their strategic vision for the journal, a description of their qualifications for the position, a current CV, and a description of any potential institutional support to David Famiano (dfamiano@ucpress.edu).

Applicants are encouraged to submit applications by February 10, 2020 although applications may be considered on an ongoing basis.

Job: Museum Director, Dumbarton Oaks

Dumbarton Oaks, Washington D.C., USA

Dumbarton Oaks is a Harvard research institute, museum, library, and garden in Washington, D.C. Since 1940 the institute and library have supported research and learning internationally in Byzantine, Garden and Landscape, and Pre-Columbian studies. The historic garden designed by Beatrix Farrand was voted among the ten best in the world by National Geographic and features occasional art installations by contemporary artists.

The museum has world-class collections of Byzantine and Pre-Columbian art and select works of European art. It is open to the public free of charge six days/week. Notable architecture on campus includes the Philip Johnson Pavilion that houses the Pre-Columbian Collection. The museum has close ties to local and Harvard communities and engages scholars and visitors from all over the world through exhibitions, gallery talks, and class visits. Dumbarton Oaks is a vibrant home of the humanities with an overarching mission of communicating the value of culture and advanced research to the broadest possible public.

The museum director will lead the museum team in planning and delivering innovative exhibits in a highly collaborative environment. The director will oversee long-term exhibition planning, budget, and all aspects of museum operations. The ideal candidate will combine knowledge of one area of the Dumbarton Oaks collections with strong leadership and administrative skills. The incumbent will join our community at an exciting time of expansion of both our academic and public programs and will contribute to the ongoing Dumbarton Oaks Access Initiative by helping us design and deliver free and open access to the collections through digital and educational initiatives.

Duties and Responsibilities:
• Oversees all aspects of museum operations including administration, budget, and staff.
• Oversees exhibition planning and delivery, leading the museum team and collaborating with other departments as well as external partners.
• Oversees handling,conservation, insurance, and loans of collections.
• Collaborates closely with other departments on building maintenance and security; outreach; and planning and delivery of public programs
• Oversees the transition to an updated collections management system.
• Oversees the digital and print publication of museum collection and exhibition catalogues.
• Leads the overhaul of the museum digital and web presence, including the provision of open access catalogues and high-resolution images of the museum collections.
• Engages actively with new scholarship relating to the Dumbarton Oaks collections, as well as with up-to-date museum practices and initiatives.
• Mentors fellows and interns from Harvard University as part of Dumbarton Oaks’ skillbuilding programs for early-career humanists.
• Maintains coordination with Harvard University policies as appropriate.
• Performs special projects and duties as required by the Director and Executive Director.

Supervisory responsibilities:
• Manage a team of ten full-time museum professionals.

Basic qualifications:
• Master’s degree in art history or museum studies required
• Minimum six years’ museum management experience, including responsibility for a professional staff and budget.

Additional qualifications:
• Advanced degree in any area of the museum’s collections preferred.
• PhD preferred.
• Proven administrative and leadership ability, ideally in a museum setting.
• Strong data and collection management skills.
• Excellent communication skills; collegiality, initiative, and versatility in a fast-paced environment that is committed to the highest standards of museum and scholarly practice.

The position remains open until filled. Details regarding application can be found at https://www.doaks.org/about/employment/museum-director-1.

Summer School: Dumbarton Oaks/HMML Syriac and Armenian Summer School 2020

Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota, USA, 13 July-7 August 2020

Deadline: 15 February 2020

Dumbarton Oaks in collaboration with the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML) announces two intensive four-week language courses: Intermediate Syriac and Introduction to Classical Armenian.

The programme, sponsored and funded by Dumbarton Oaks, will be hosted at HMML, located on the campus of Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota. The summer school will run from July 13 to August 7, 2020. The audience is doctoral students or recent PhDs who can demonstrate a need for Syriac or Armenian in their research.

For those applying for Introductory Classical Armenian, no prior knowledge is expected but some preparation as directed by the instructors will be required before arrival. Those with significant prior study of Aremenian (e.g., a semester-long class) will not be considered. Following this intensive course, students will be able to continue reading on their own or to enter reading courses at other institutions.

The courses will also include an introduction to paleography and to the study and use of manuscripts, especially those now available in the vHMML Reading Room from HMML’s vast collection of digitized manuscripts.

Approximately ten places will be available for each course. Costs for tuition, housing, and meals will be covered by Dumbarton Oaks. The selected participants will be responsible for their own travel costs to and from Saint John’s University. The deadline for applications is February 15, 2020.

For further information, see http://hmml.org/events/summer-courses/.

Fellowship: Byzantine Studies Postdoctoral Fellowship 2020-21

Medieval Institute University of Notre Dame, IN, USA

Deadline: 1 February 2020

Following substantial investment in the area of Byzantine Studies at the University of Notre Dame, including the acquisition of the Milton V. Anastos Library of Byzantine Civilization and generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Medieval Institute at the University of Notre Dame is delighted to invite applicants for a nine-month Postdoctoral Fellowship in Byzantine Studies. This fellowship is designed for junior scholars with a completed doctorate whose research deals with some aspect of the Byzantine world. The fellow is expected to pursue promising research towards scholarly publication and/or the development of new subject areas. This Fellowship is open to qualified applicants in all fields and sub-disciplines of Byzantine Studies, such as history (including its auxiliary disciplines), archaeology, art history, literature, theology, and liturgical studies, as well as the study of Byzantium’s interactions with neighboring cultures. The fellowship holder will pursue research in residence at the University of Notre Dame’s famed Medieval Institute during the academic year.

The intent of this Fellowship is to enable its holder to do innovative research drawing on the rich resources held in the Milton V. Anastos Collection, the Medieval Institute, and the Hesburgh Library more broadly. This may include the completion of book manuscripts and articles, work on text editions, or the development of new trajectories of research in one of the aforementioned fields. The Fellowship carries no teaching responsibilities, but the fellow will have the opportunity to participate in the multidisciplinary activities of Notre Dame faculty related to Byzantium, Eastern Christianity, and the history of the Levant. The Fellow will be provided with a private workspace in the Medieval Institute, enjoy full library and computer privileges, and have access to all the Institute’s research tools.

In addition, towards the conclusion of the fellowship period the fellow’s work will be at the center of a workshop organized within the framework of the Byzantine Studies Seminar. Senior scholars, chosen in cooperation with the Medieval Institute, will be invited for this event treating the fellow’s subject matter. The senior scholars will discuss draft versions of the fellow’s book manuscript or articles or discuss the further development of ongoing research projects.

Qualifications: Byzantine Studies fellows must hold a Ph.D. from an internationally recognized institution. The Ph.D. must be in hand by the beginning of the fellowship term.

Application Instructions: Applicants should submit a letter of application (cover letter), a project proposal of no more than 2500 words, a current C.V., and three letters of recommendation. Applicants will also complete an informational sheet in Interfolio. To apply, see here.

Merchants and Markets in Late Antiquity

Society for Classical Studies Annual Meeting, Chicago, USA, 7-10 January 2021

Deadline: 7 February 2020

We are inviting the submission of abstracts for the organizer-refereed panel ‘Merchants and Markets in Late Antiquity’ at the 2021 annual meeting of the Society for Classical Studies. This annual meeting will be held in Chicago from January 7-10, 2021. The deadline for submitting an abstract is February 7, 2020.

A social, cultural, and economic history of work and trade in the later Roman empire remains to be written. Recent years have seen a renewed interest in labour, professions, commerce, and their organization during the Imperial period, while the last two decades have been a remarkably productive time for the study of the Roman economy in general. The resultant scholarship has presented new approaches which have greatly advanced our understanding of both structural and specific characteristics of the economy. The most influential of these has been the adoption of New Institutional Economics (e.g. Scheidel, Morris, and Saller 2007), but there has also been a steady stream of microeconomic studies focusing on the social elements of economic activity (Terpstra 2013; Venticinque 2016; Hawkins 2016) and sociocultural histories of work and professions (e.g. Verboven and Laes 2016). Some of this scholarship has extended into Late Antiquity, though the most influential work remains Wickham’s magisterial Framing the Early Middle Ages (2006). Nevertheless, scholarship on the later Roman world has not yet sought to integrate the economic theories that have reconditioned the way of writing the socio-economic history of the early Roman Empire.

The future of late Roman social and economic history lies in utilizing and adapting innovative approaches to the Roman economy for the study of Late Antiquity. The institutional change for which this period is known offers plentiful opportunities to consider how individual economic actors were affected by structural, religious, and political changes, and the field is ripe for a re-evaluation of the intersection between social norms and the economy.

This panel hopes to bring together scholars from a wide range of subjects and backgrounds, and to solicit abstracts for papers considering a variety of issues and addressing such diverse questions as:

· What awareness did local merchants, craftsmen, and transporters have of wider economic change in Late Antiquity?
· What strategies did these individuals develop to mitigate risk and resolve economic challenges, and are the strategies of Late Antiquity fundamentally different in some way from those used in earlier or later periods?
· Can we speak of market integration or disintegration in Late Antiquity?
· What were the outcomes of state institutional and structural changes to the economy at local and regional levels?
· What effects did the development of new legal and fiscal systems have on the social and political lives of merchants and craftsmen?

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be submitted as email attachments to info@classicalstudies.org by February 7, 2020. The title of the email should be the title of the panel. Abstracts should contain a title of the paper, but should not have any information regarding the identity of the submitter. All abstracts for papers will be reviewed anonymously. For enquiries, please email Jane Sancinito (jsancini@oberlin.edu) or John Fabiano (john.fabiano@utoronto.ca).

Scholarship: Two Fully-funded PhD Scholarships in Liturgical Studies, University of Notre Dame

University of Notre Dame, IN, USA

Deadline: 2 January 2020

The Graduate School at the University of Notre Dame accepts up to two, fully-funded PhD students per year in Liturgical Studies. The program in Liturgical Studies integrates three sub-disciplines: Liturgical History; Liturgical Theology; Ritual Studies.

The program offers a wide range of research opportunities with particular strengths in early and late antique Christian ritual and material culture, medieval liturgy, Byzantine Christianity, manuscript studies, contemporary liturgical theology, and ritual studies. Recent dissertations have included topics on ritual at the Second Temple, architecture and liturgy in medieval Salisbury, liturgy and life in Crusader Jerusalem, ritual in Igbo culture, imperial rites for commemorating earthquakes in late antique Constantinople, and liturgy and identity in the California Missions.

The Liturgical Studies program was founded in 1947 as the first graduate program in the Department of Theology and quickly grew to become an international center for the study of liturgy. Pioneers in the discipline who have taught at Notre Dame include Josef Jungmann, Louis Bouyer, Robert Taft, Paul Bradshaw, and many others. The program is currently comprised of seven faculty members and represents one of the largest concentrations of liturgical scholars at one place in the world.

In addition to its core strengths, Liturgical Studies offers a variety of opportunities for research collaboration with other institutions at Notre Dame, including the Medieval Institute, the Program in Sacred Music, other departments at the university (esp. History, Anthropology and Sociology) and other programs within the Theology Department, including Christianity and Judaism in Antiquity (CJA), the History of Christianity (HC), and Systematic Theology (ST). The Hesburgh Libraries system has extensive holdings in theology and one of the nation’s largest collections in medieval and Byzantine studies, including the Milton Anastos Collection. The Theology Department also offers a broad range of ancient languages, including courses in Greek, Latin, Syriac, Hebrew, Coptic, Armenian and Ge’ez, with additional opportunities for studying Georgian, Slavonic, and Jewish Aramaic.

All applications must be submitted to the Graduate School by January 2, 2020. More information and a link to the online application may be found at https://theology.nd.edu/graduate-programs/ph-d/.