Call for Papers: Dumbarton Oaks Sponsored Sessions at Kalamazoo

Deadline: 15 September 2019

Dumbarton Oaks is sponsoring five sessions at the 2020 International Congress on Medieval Studies. For more information, including the topics of each Dumbarton Oaks sponsored session, please visit the DO website. Proposals are due to Dr. Nicole Eddy by September 15, 2019.

A few important notes:
• Any proposals or questions can be directed to Nicole Eddy (eddyn01@doaks.org). Please indicate which session you are interested in.
• All proposals should include an abstract of no more than one page and a completed participant information form (find it here: https://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions).
• Any proposals not chosen for inclusion by our session organizers will be forwarded to the congress organizers for consideration for the General Sessions.

Call for Papers: Jerusalem the Holy City

Deadline: 15 September 2019

The Stanford University Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (CMEMS) is pleased to announce that we will sponsor three sessions at the 55th International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, Michigan (May 7-10, 2020). Among these are two linked panel sessions entitled “Jerusalem: The Holy City.” The first considers medieval imaginings of a distant Jerusalem across textual, visual, and material culture, while the second considers Jerusalem as an interreligious experience among Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

We invite proposals for each of these sessions, and will consider all those received by September 15th. Proposals should consist of a short abstract (300 words max) and a completed participant information form. General submissions guidelines are available here, but please get in touch if you have any questions. As per ICMS rules, any proposals not accepted for our sessions will be forwarded to the Congress committee to be considered for inclusion in the General Sessions.

Jerusalem (I): The Holy City in Textual, Visual, and Material Culture

Organizer: Mareike Elisa Reisch, Stanford University

This panel will focus on how Jerusalem was imagined from afar in textual, visual, and material culture. As recent scholarship has shown, Jerusalem existed not only as a geographical space entangled in local and transregional politics, but also as the subject of imaginations from afar because of its importance as a sacred space in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. People integrated, for example, images of Jerusalem into their personal devotional practices when they embarked on a virtual pilgrimage. As the place of Christian salvation, Jerusalem also inspired textual, visual, and material productions for public devotional practices. The city was imagined as the ultimate acquisition for religio-political expansion, as seen during the crusades. Material objects such as pilgrimage badges and gravesites show one’s personal connections and images of Jerusalem. The different ways in which Jerusalem was imagined from afar are still traceable in textual culture in the form of pilgrimage guidebooks, devotional texts, accounts of the crusades, and literary production, in architectural structures, in visual images such as altarpieces, epitaphs, and maps. This panel welcomes papers from all fields and aims for an interdisciplinary exchange.

Please send enquiries and submissions to mreisch@stanford.edu

Jerusalem (II): The Holy City as Interreligious Experience.

Organizer: Ana C. Núñez, Stanford University

This panel will focus on the nature of Jerusalem as an interreligious space. As the home of Jews, Christians, and Muslims, as well as the destination of pilgrims, crusaders, and merchants, Jerusalem was a simultaneously shared, contested, and negotiated site. This panel will offer a forum to discuss how texts, architecture, and art reflect the centuries of contestation and negotiation from Late Antiquity to the Late Middle Ages. Pilgrimage texts from the ninth century, for example, detail the travel documents that the Christian pilgrim needed in order to visit Jerusalem under Muslim rule. The Tomb of David on Mount Zion witnessed competing claims between Jews and Christians in the fifteenth century, until in the first half of the sixteenth century Muslim control resulted in the conversion of the chapel into a mosque, and the banned entry of both Jews and Christians. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre is another example of interreligious experience, in which various Christian communities—Latins, Georgians, Greeks, Armenians, and Ethiopians—vied for control and supremacy. To explore the long and multi-faceted history of Jerusalem as an interreligious space, we welcome papers from across disciplines, from anytime between Late Antiquity and the Late Middle Ages.

Please send enquiries and submissions to ananunez@stanford.edu

Exhibition: Ornament: Fragments of Byzantine Fashion

Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, D.C., USA, 10 September-2019 5 January 2020

Excavations in the nineteenth century unearthed scores of the ornate dress textiles which wrapped the people of medieval Egypt in their graves. Ornament: Fragments of Byzantine Fashion brings together complete tunics, parts of garments, and contemporary replicas of ancient dress to evoke the fashions of this now lost world. These textiles often preserved traces of their wearers in the forms of folds and stains, providing researchers with important information about the people buried in these garments. But alongside these bodily vestiges, the decoration of these textiles reveals much about the sophistication and aesthetics of the period in which they were crafted. Often cut into pieces by dealers at the time they were sold on the art market, these fragments survive in an incomplete state that has complicated our understanding of Byzantine dress practices.

The exhibition also celebrates the publication of a digital catalogue of our textiles, which will appear on the Dumbarton Oaks website to coincide with the exhibition.
Programming includes a Study Day for graduate students and a series of Saturday gallery talks. More information will be posted here: https://www.doaks.org/visit/museum/exhibitions/ornament

Call for Papers: The Crusades and Nature

Deadline: 1 August 2019

An understanding of Anthropocene – the history of human interactions with natural environment – has never been more pressing than today. Several series of paper sessions exploring the intersection of crusader studies and environmental studies are being organized for conferences at Kalamazoo, Michigan (May, 2020), Leeds, UK (July, 2020) and the upcoming Society for the Study of the Crusades in the Latin East Conference, London, UK (June, 2020).

These sessions will address encounters with, responses to, and representations of a broad variety of natural phenomena having to do with crusades and the Latin States.

We encourage a wide variety of methods and discourses. Possible topics include:

– portents and marvels
– encounters with familiar and unfamiliar fauna, flora and natural phenomena
– natural disasters (earthquakes, floods, etc.)
– traveling across natural landscapes
– experiences of the elements
– domestic and domesticated animals or conversely animals characterized as “wild” or “exotic”
– animal or environmental metaphors
– cultivation, consumption and trade in crops, fruit, spices, etc.
– transformation of the natural landscape (for example, through deforestation or irrigation)
– introduced and invasive species
– natural topography (real or imaginary)

Please send your abstracts of about 200 words to the organizers, Elizabeth Lapina (lapina@wisc.edu) and Jessalynn Bird (jessalynn.bird@gmail.com), before August 1st. Make sure to specify which conference you are planning to attend.

Conference: St. Ephrem the Syrian in Byzantium

Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI, USA, 9 November 2019

The symposium on ‘St. Ephrem the Syrian in Byzantium,’ on the writings collectively attributed to Ephrem Graecus, will take place at Marquette University (Eisenberg Reading Room, Sensenbrenner Hall) on November 9, 2019 from 10:00am to 3:00pm. Speakers include Fr. Maximos Constas (Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology), Fr. Kevin Kalish (Bridgewater State University), Dr. Marcus Plested (Marquette University), Dr. Jeanne-Nicole Mellon Saint-Laurent (Marquette University), and Dr. Alexis Torrance (University of Notre Dame). Proceedings are open to the public. For questions, email tikhon.pino@marquette.edu.

Call for Papers: Medieval French Without Borders

12th Floor Lounge, Lowenstein, Lincoln Center, New York, USA, 21-22 March 2020

Deadline: 15 September 2019

Hosted by: Center for Medieval Studies, Fordham University
Co-sponsored with the Centre for Medieval Literature, University of Southern Denmark and University of York, and the Program in Comparative Literature, Fordham University

This international conference looks anew at the origins and development of the langue d’oïl – both as a transactional language and in its high cultural form of literary French – within multilingual contact zones and as a medium of social, cultural and literary exchange. Whether as a second language of empire (Carolingian, Angevin, German) or as an idiom spread by merchants, sailors, clerics, artisans, and pilgrims, as well as by soldiers and crusaders, French came in contact with varieties of Arabic, Breton, Dutch, English, German, Greek, Hebrew, Irish, Norse, Occitan and Welsh. By integrating French with the other languages and literatures with which it came in contact from the ninth until the sixteenth centuries, this conference proposes new contexts for French that expand and complement more familiar explanatory frameworks such as identity, cultural prestige, and source studies. See the full CFP at the conference website: https://mvstconference.ace.fordham.edu/medievalfrenchwithoutborders/.

Participants include: Mark Chinca, Thelma Fenster, Marisa Galvez, Jane Gilbert, Wolfgang Haubrichs, Sarah Kay, Maryanne Kowaleski, Karla Mallette, Anne-Hélène Miller, Laura Morreale, Lars Boje Mortensen, Thomas O’Donnell, Sara Poor, Brian Reilly, Teresa Shawcross, Elizabeth M. Tyler, and Jocelyn Wogan-Browne.

Please submit an abstract and cover letter with contact information by September 15, 2019 to the Center for Medieval Studies, FMH 405B, Fordham University, Bronx, NY 10458, or by email to medievals@fordham.edu, or by fax to 718-817-3987.

Conference: The Insular Worlds of Byzantium

Byzantine Studies Colloquium

Dumbarton Oaks, Washington D.C., USA, 15 November 20119

Byzantine islands have been largely considered marginal to the dramatic political, social, and economic changes the Byzantine heartland experienced in the seventh century and at the onset of Arab expansion in the eastern Mediterranean. Major islands, such as Sicily, Sardinia, Malta, and the Balearics, were lost forever. Others, like Crete and Cyprus, remained in flux until they were briefly reclaimed by Byzantium in tenth century before coming under Latin control during the Crusades. Contrary to the perspectives offered by written sources (Byzantine, Arab, and Western), which for the most part dismiss them as marginal spaces, places of exile, or military outposts along maritime frontiers, islands constitute the best examples of the transformative adaptability of Byzantine society during periods of volatility and transition. Instead of decline and abandonment, archaeological work and results point to the existence of active communities, local and regional economic exchanges, and cultural continuities and interconnections during the period between the seventh century and the fall of Constantinople to the Crusaders in 1204.

Speakers will address the topic of Byzantine islands through case studies viewed in their broader Mediterranean and comparative contexts. The exploration of islands as hubs where Byzantine, Islamic, and Western European cultures encountered and influenced the local political, economic, and social structures will permit new insights into the networks of island societies and their legacies. Not only were islands located along commercial shipping routes, but, as spaces of adaptive economic activities and social strategies that were molded by military and political realities, they presented unique opportunities for cultural interconnections. In this context, the “Insular Worlds of Byzantium” will provide new and revised perspectives on the Byzantine Mediterranean and beyond.

Speakers:
• Nikolas Bakirtzis, The Cyprus Institute
• William Caraher, University of North Dakota
• Salvatore Cosentino, Università di Bologna
• Sarah Davis-Secord, University of New Mexico
• Michael Decker, University of South Florida
• Jonathan Shea, Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection
• Joanita Vroom, Universiteit Leiden
• Luca Zavagno, Bilkent Üniversitesi

Fellowship: Dumbarton Oaks Byzantine Studies Fellowships

Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC, USA

Deadline: 1 November 2019

Fellowships (junior, regular, summer, Tyler) are awarded to scholars on the basis of demonstrated scholarly ability and preparation of the candidate, including knowledge of requisite languages, interest and value of the study or project, and the project’s relevance to the resources of Dumbarton Oaks. Applications due November 1, 2019 for the 2020-2021 academic year.

For further information on all awards, please visit the Dumbarton Oaks website.

Grant: Dumbarton Oaks One-Month Research Awards

Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC, USA

Deadline: 1 October 2019

Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection offers One-Month Research Awards of $3,000 to scholars holding a PhD and working on research projects in Byzantine studies or related fields. The awards were established to make the intellectual community, as well as the library, rare book, garden, and museum resources, of Dumbarton Oaks more widely available to a broader range of scholars for shorter terms and with some flexibility in starting dates. Awards are intended especially for those who might not be able to avail themselves of a longer-term fellowship at Dumbarton Oaks, or scholars in related disciplines who seek greater exposure to our fields of study. Applications due October 1, 2019 for January 15 – June 30 award period.

For further information on all awards, please visit the Dumbarton Oaks website.