Job: Lecturer in Late Antique Archaeology

University of Edinburgh

Deadline: 7 January 2019

We seek to appoint a specialist in Late Antique Archaeology, broadly understood in terms of period and with a geographical focus on the later Roman Empire, early Byzantium, and the post-Roman Western Mediterranean. The successful candidate will have a track record of internationally excellent publications, proportionate to career stage, and will continue to publish and research at the highest level in this and related disciplines. They will be expected to make a significant contribution to the teaching of late antique archaeology at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, as well as to doctoral supervision and will be expected to collaborate with other Roman archaeologists and other late antique and Byzantine specialists.

For full details, see https://www.vacancies.ed.ac.uk/pls/corehrrecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.jobspec?p_id=046188

Call for Papers: Armenia & Byzantium: Perspectives on Cultural and Political Relations

Graduate and Early Career Workshop, University of Oxford, 22–23 March 2019

Deadline: 15 December 2018

The ‘Armenia & Byzantium: Perspectives on Cultural and Political Relations’ is a two-day workshop which intends to bring together early career researchers working in the fields of Armenian and Byzantine studies and to give them the opportunity to discuss their research with senior specialists in their field. This workshop will continue the successful collaboration between Oxford and Vienna, which began last year in the University of Vienna with the workshop ‘Armenia & Byzantium without Borders’ convened by Dr Emilio Bonfiglio and Professor Claudia Rapp within the framework of ‘Moving Byzantium: Mobility, Microstructure and Personal Agency’ project.

We are pleased to invite advanced PhD candidates and early career researchers working in the fields of Late Antique, Armenian, Byzantine, and Middle Eastern Studies to submit proposals for 20-minute papers connected with the main topics of Armenian-Byzantine relations with a focus on aspects of political and cultural interactions throughout the Middle Ages. We are particularly interested in new research which explores the participation of the Armenians in the Byzantine world and the Byzantine policies which had a direct influence on the Armenians. Each paper presented at the workshop will be accompanied by a senior scholar’s 10-minute response, followed by a general discussion. The workshop will be inaugurated with the lecture of our keynote speaker, Prof. Christina Maranci (Tufts University).

Limited travel grants will be available to assist those who would otherwise be unable to attend. Paper proposals should be sent by 15th December 2018 to David Zakarian. Applications should include: a) university affiliation; b) graduate level; c) title of the paper; d) abstract (max 250 words); e) CV.

Scientific Committee: Dr. David Zakarian (Oxford), Prof. Theo M. van Lint (Oxford), Dr Emilio Bonfiglio (Vienna), and Prof. Claudia Rapp (Vienna)

Summer School: Byzantine Centres of Magnificence

Oxford University Summer School for Adults, 13-20 July 2019

Apart from Constantinople, the political and cultural capital of the Byzantine empire for over a thousand years, there were other wealthy cities and towns as well as monastic communities in the empire which produced exquisite cultural and artistic products. Using contemporary texts and visual aids, the course will trace the development of Constantinople and certain other Byzantine centres and examine the cultural, artistic and everyday life in those centres from the fourth to the fifteenth century.

The course will be taught by Dr Aphrodite Papayianni, who teaches at the University of London and OUDCE.

Full information regarding the course can be found at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/courses/byzantine-centers-of-magnificence?code=O18I101MBR

Call for papers: Seventh Century Syrian Numismatic Round Table

‘The Hive’, Worcester, 6-7 April 2019

The Round Table aims to bring together numismatists, historians and archaeologist with an interest in Late Antiquity/Early Islam in Syria/Palestine and the surrounding area. We hold small informal conferences at roughly two-yearly intervals which usually include at least twelve papers with ample time allowed for discussion. The central focus is the Syrian Arab-Byzantine coinage, but papers can cover Byzantine or Post-Reform Umayyad coinage, or deal with aspects of the history or archaeology of Syria/Palestine. We also normally include one or two papers on related topics (e.g. seals, weights etc.) or adjacent localities (e.g. Egypt or the Sasanian Empire). Papers sometimes present completed pieces of research, but more often they deal with ‘work in progress’.

If you are interested in presenting a paper (or would just like more information about the conference) please contact Tony Goodwin on a.goodwin2@btopenworld.com. Presentations should normally last no more than 40 minutes, but much shorter papers are equally acceptable. A short abstract will be circulated before the conference and the papers will be published in full in the conference proceedings. The Hive conference centre in Worcester was the very successful venue for our last but one conference in 2013.

Seminar Series: University of Birmingham Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies 2018/19

The Centre’s General Seminar normally meets in the Whitting Room (436), 4th floor, Arts Building on Thursdays at 5.15pm, unless otherwise stated and is open to all interested in the related concerns of the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies.

AUTUMN TERM 2018

11 Oct: Students of the Centre
Travellers’ Tales

18 Oct: Georgios Chatzelis (Athens)
Invention and reality in Byzantine historical narratives: the impact of Polyaenus and military manuals on the Alexiad of Anna Komnene

25 Oct: Maroula Perisanidi (Leeds)
Equines and the margins of Byzantine power: humility or humiliation?

1 Nov: Cecily Hennessy (London)
Byzantine influence in Winchester Cathedral?

15 Nov: Maria Papadaki (Edinburgh)
Current archaeological research on settlement and provincial life in the Byzantine Mediterranean: the case of the Peloponnese

22 Nov: Paul Magdalino (St Andrews)
The church of St John the Theologian and the End of Antiquity in Constantinople
(Annual SPBS Autumn Lecture)

29 Nov: Marc Baer (London)
Sultans as saviors: early modern Mediterranean Jewish accounts of the Ottoman rulers

6 Dec: Ethan Menchinger (Manchester)
Ottoman dreams of destiny and omens of greatness

13 Dec: Ioulia Kolovou (Glasgow)
Reconfiguring the template: Representations of powerful women in historical fiction — the case of Anna Komnene
(Joint Seminar with CESMA)

SPRING TERM 2019

24 Jan: Alexandra Vukovich (Oxford)
Interpreting the Constantinopolitan landscape: A Rus traveller in Byzantium

31 Jan: Ceyda Karamürsel (London)
Unlikely migrants: slavery, emancipation, and race in the Reform-Era Ottoman Mediterranean

7 Feb: Brian McLaughlin (London)
Kantakouzenos’ daemon: providence and persuasion in late Byzantine historiography

14 Feb: Huw Halstead (St Andrews)
‘Remnants of Byzantium’: the uses of the past by the expatriated Greeks of Turkey

28 Feb: Gonda Van Steen (London)
Greek Adoptees Anonymous: adoption, memory and Cold War Greece

7 Mar: Michael Talbot (London)
Consular networks, shipping routes, and the Ottoman world in the late 19th century

14 Mar: Miltos Pechlivanos (Berlin)
Francis Bacon in Ancient Greek. Nikolaos Mavrokordatos (1680-1730) and cultural mobility

21 Mar: Theofili Kampianaki (Birmingham)
Flavius Josephus in medieval Greek and Latin Histories: some cross-cultural approaches

Seminar Series: CHS 2018-19 Late Antique & Byzantine Seminar Series at King’s College London

Through its regular series of seminars, colloquia, public lectures and international conferences, the Centre for Hellenic Studies is a concentrated force for the advancement of research in all aspects of Hellenic culture.

All its activities are free, open to the public and designed to be accessible to a wide audience.

Semester 1

Convened by Vicky Manolopoulou

Tuesday 25 September, 17.30
Understanding settlements in Byzantine Greece: Old data and new approaches for the Peloponnese (11th -12th eleventh centuries)
K2.29 Council Room
A seminar with Maria Papadaki (University of Edinburgh / University of Patras).

Tuesday 9 October, 17.30
Equines and the margins of Byzantine power: Humility or humiliation?
K2.29 Council Room.
A seminar with Maroula Perisanidi (University of Leeds).

Tuesday 23 October, 17.30
Identifying Medieval burials – what to do with unexpected Byzantines?
River Room
A seminar with Sophie Moore.

Tuesday 13 November, 17.30
Revising the chronology of Late Antique Ephesus: Urban phasing and epigraphic landscapes
K2.29 Council Room.
A seminar with Luke Lavan (University of Kent).

 

Semester 2

Convened by Petros Bouras-Vallianatos

Tuesday 22 January, 17.30
A Rus traveller in Constantinople
K2.29 Council Room.
A seminar with Alexandra Vukovich (University of Cambridge).

Tuesday 5 February, 17.30
Commemorative religious processions in Byzantine Constantinople
K2.29 Council Room.
A seminar with Vicky Manolopoulou (King’s College London).

Tuesday 26 February, 17.30
Approaching Byzantine slavery
K2.29 Council Room.
A seminar with Marek Jankowiak (Oxford).

Tuesday 12 March, 17.30
Foreign trade in the early Byzantine Empire: beyond the Silk Road
River Room
A seminar with Rebecca Darley (Birkbeck).

Tuesday 26 March, 17.30
The earliest traces of Christianisation from northeastern Italy and a newly discovered late antique inscription from Venice
K2.29 Council Room.
A seminar with Lorenzo Calvelli (Venice).

For further information see: https://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/ahri/centres/chs/events/events.aspx

Conference: Gold Glass Memorial Day for Daniel T. Howells

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, Oxford, 27 April 2019

A conference, co-hosted by Drs Susan Walker (Oxford University) and Ine Jacobs (Ioannou Centre), in commemoration of the life and work of the late Dr Daniel Howells. Speakers, many of whom knew or worked with Dr Howells, will present papers on the art of ancient gold glass, its historical contexts and influence on later art.

Speakers:

· Giulia Cesarin, “Gold-band glass: from Hellenistic to Roman luxury glass production.”

· Yasoko Fujii, “A Study of Continuity: gold leaf techniques on gold glass. From Hellenistic ‘Kirikane’ to Late Roman ‘Scratching’.”

· Will Lewis, “A Constantinian prince’s guide to religion and culture in the mid-fourth century.”

· Susan Walker, “Craft, consumers and the value of gold-glass in late antique Rome.”

· Lucy Grig, “’Cultures of Conviviality’: thinking about the role of the gold glasses in feasting and conviviality.”

· Eileen Rubery, “Gold glass and the cults of female saints in Rome: whatever happened to the Virgin Mary?”

For online registration, visit the conference’s Eventbrite page.

Call for Papers: Following the Holy Fathers: Patristic Sources in the Palamite Controversy

“Following the Holy Fathers: Patristic Sources in the Palamite Controversy”, 18th International Conference on Patristic Studies, Oxford, 19-24 August 2019

Deadline: 31 August 2018

Opponents on both sides of the Palamite controversy (1338-1368) invoked the writings of the Church Fathers to support their theological claims and positions. Though scholars have long debated the patristic antecedents of the essence-energies distinction, research has tended to focus almost exclusively on the fidelity of St. Gregory Palamas to his patristic sources. This Workshop seeks, instead, to explore the use of the Fathers in the Palamite controversy more generally, from neglected influences on the writings of Palamas himself to the use of patristic authorities by Gregory’s opponents and subsequent defenders. Comprising a philological, historical, and theological exploration, we welcome papers on the following topics:

  • The Fathers in St. Gregory Palamas
  • Patristic sources in anti-Palamite theology (from Barlaam to Manuel Kalekas and beyond)
  • Middle Byzantine and later patristic influences on the Palamite controversy
  • The role of the Liturgy and Hymnography in the Palamite controversy
  • The use of the Fathers by Palamite authors to 1453 (from Dishypatos and Kokkinos to Eugenikos and Scholarios)

Papers may focus on individual Church Fathers or patristic sources and methodology in general on any aspect of patristic theology that enhances our understanding of Palamite and anti-Palamite theology in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries.

Abstracts, of no more than 300 words, to oxfordpalamas@gmail.com.