Scholarship: Master’s Scholarships in Medieval Studies

Central European University, Vienna, Austria

Deadline: 30 January 2020

We offer an intensive, cross-disciplinary course of study on all aspects of history and culture between 300 and 1600 CE. Renowned faculty help you uncover and understand the past of Central and Western Europe, as well as the Byzantine, Slavic, Jewish, Arab and Ottoman worlds, in a global context. Our strong relationship with local universities and cultural institutions, on-site learning and field trip opportunities, internship program, source language courses and exhaustive library on all things medieval make us an ideal incubator for future scholars and professionals in and outside of academia. In addition to coursework at the Vienna campus, students may also take advantage of academic activities and resources available on CEU’s Budapest campus.

MA in Late Antique, Medieval and Early Modern Studies / 1 YEAR / This program is designed for students with a strong research agenda centered around late antique and medieval Latin, Slavonic, Byzantine or Ottoman culture and a solid grounding in medieval or early modern history or a bordering discipline, such as philology, literature, philosophy or archeology. You will master the latest research methodologies and enrich your research through the study of relevant source languages.

For further details, see https://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BXQ399/masters-scholarships-in-medieval-studies.

Scholarship: Fully-funded PhD Scholarship in Classics and Late Antique History

University of St Andrews

Deadline: 16 January 2020

The University of St Andrews is pleased to offer a full scholarship funded by St Leonard’s Postgraduate College, to support an exceptional student undertaking doctoral research in the following project: ‘Remembering the Dead on the Edge of Empire: Epitaphs and Social Change in Late Antique Italy (300-600 CE)’

This project will examine the transformations of north Italian society between 300 and 600 CE, analysing key developments in the relationship between memory, identity, and social power. Focusing on funerary inscriptions as part of the strategies for social promotion used by inhabitants of Italian cities – including both migrant and ‘indigenous’ groups – it will examine their contribution to the redefinition of the communities in which they lived. The resulting thesis will provide an original picture of late antique Italy, giving voice to new and often neglected social groups and identities. It will also focus directly on a relatively neglected, yet crucially important, set of Late Antique data – inscribed epitaphs. Scholars have recently paid great attention to funerary rites as a means of establishing social standing within a community. Our proposed project goes one step further, focusing on how this activity continued beyond death and burial – through the medium of inscribing words on stone. In doing this, it will represent an innovative and ground-breaking study in late antique studies, whether in terms of its interdisciplinary methodology, approach, and results.

For full information, see https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/fees-and-funding/postgraduate/scholarships/world-leading-classics-history/.

Scholarship: Two Fully-funded PhD Scholarships in Liturgical Studies, University of Notre Dame

University of Notre Dame, IN, USA

Deadline: 2 January 2020

The Graduate School at the University of Notre Dame accepts up to two, fully-funded PhD students per year in Liturgical Studies. The program in Liturgical Studies integrates three sub-disciplines: Liturgical History; Liturgical Theology; Ritual Studies.

The program offers a wide range of research opportunities with particular strengths in early and late antique Christian ritual and material culture, medieval liturgy, Byzantine Christianity, manuscript studies, contemporary liturgical theology, and ritual studies. Recent dissertations have included topics on ritual at the Second Temple, architecture and liturgy in medieval Salisbury, liturgy and life in Crusader Jerusalem, ritual in Igbo culture, imperial rites for commemorating earthquakes in late antique Constantinople, and liturgy and identity in the California Missions.

The Liturgical Studies program was founded in 1947 as the first graduate program in the Department of Theology and quickly grew to become an international center for the study of liturgy. Pioneers in the discipline who have taught at Notre Dame include Josef Jungmann, Louis Bouyer, Robert Taft, Paul Bradshaw, and many others. The program is currently comprised of seven faculty members and represents one of the largest concentrations of liturgical scholars at one place in the world.

In addition to its core strengths, Liturgical Studies offers a variety of opportunities for research collaboration with other institutions at Notre Dame, including the Medieval Institute, the Program in Sacred Music, other departments at the university (esp. History, Anthropology and Sociology) and other programs within the Theology Department, including Christianity and Judaism in Antiquity (CJA), the History of Christianity (HC), and Systematic Theology (ST). The Hesburgh Libraries system has extensive holdings in theology and one of the nation’s largest collections in medieval and Byzantine studies, including the Milton Anastos Collection. The Theology Department also offers a broad range of ancient languages, including courses in Greek, Latin, Syriac, Hebrew, Coptic, Armenian and Ge’ez, with additional opportunities for studying Georgian, Slavonic, and Jewish Aramaic.

All applications must be submitted to the Graduate School by January 2, 2020. More information and a link to the online application may be found at https://theology.nd.edu/graduate-programs/ph-d/.