Job: Professor (W1, tenure track) of the History of the Medieval Middle East and the Mediterranean

University of Tübingen, Germany

Deadline: 29 June 2020

The Faculty of Humanities at the University of Tübingen invites applications for a position in the Department of History, Medieval History section, as a Professor (W1, tenure track) of the History of the Medieval Middle East and the Mediterranean to commence as soon as possible.

The holder of this professorship will represent the History of the Medieval Middle East and the Mediterranean from the 7th to the 15th century.

The successful candidate will have a completed doctorate in the area within the advertised professorship which demonstrates potential for outstanding publications in leading international journals. He or she will be able to demonstrate teaching experience. Applicants will be expected to be able to read historical sources in at least two different languages in the area (Greek, Arabic, Syrian, Persian, Coptic, etc.). The holder of this position will be in a position to develop core research areas from both before and after the turn of the first millennium CE.

The successful candidate will be willing and able to collaborate on a broad thematic basis within the Faculty’s research centers and networks and in all study programs of the History Department.

This is a tenure-track position and is subject to an interim evaluation after four years and a final evaluation after six years. If the final evaluation is positive, the post will be upgraded to a full (W3) professorship after six years with no re-advertising of the position. The position has a teaching load of four hours per week prior to interim evaluation, and six hours thereafter.

For full details: https://uni-tuebingen.de/en/faculties/faculty-of-humanities/faculty/vacancies-job-offers/#c1077819.

Call for Papers: Licht aus dem Osten? Natural Light in Medieval Churches Between Byzantium and the West

Freie Universität Berlin, Germany, 26-27 November 2020 (or virtually)

Deadline: 15 June 2020

Throughout the medieval period, Christian churches were designed in such a way that natural light was deployed to underscore a variety of theological statements. The solutions usually found in Latin and Byzantine churches have been analysed in recent decades. However, the cultures that developed at the crossroads of the Latin, Greek, and Slavic cultural spheres, particularly in regions of the Balkan Peninsula and the Carpathian Mountains, advanced their own formulas for how to use natural light in ecclesiastical buildings. These solutions depended on know-how inherited from Antiquity, and were further shaped by local climatic, economic, and theological parameters. The present workshop invites papers on the economy of natural light in medieval churches constructed across Eastern Europe, from the Balkans to the Baltic Sea, and throughout the medieval period. Whether adopted or inspired from the more established traditions on the margins of the Mediterranean, local customs are examined in order to understand how natural light phenomena unfolded in ecclesiastical spaces, and how they related to the design, architecture, decorations, liturgical objects, or rituals performed inside the buildings. The multilayered analyses of light Inszenierung examined in this workshop cast light on the structuring of sacred spaces in the Byzantine-Slavic cultural spheres. Moreover, the expertise behind the deployment of these natural light effects reveals patterns of knowledge transfer and cultural interaction between Byzantium, the West, and the Slavic world that extended in regions of Eastern Europe during the Middle Ages.

Proposals for 30-minute papers in English should include the following: an abstract (300 words max.) and a brief CV (2 pages max.). Proposals should be emailed to the organizers of the workshop at aisulli[at]umich.edu and vladimir.ivanovici[at]usi.ch by 15 June 2020. Please include in the email subject line “Berlin Workshop Proposal”.

For all accepted presenters, the cost of travel, accommodations, and meals will be covered by the host institution through a grant sponsored by the VolkswagenStiftung and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Call for sessions: Mary Jaharis Center Sponsored Panel, 6th Forum Medieval Art

6th Forum Medieval Art, Kunstgeschichtlichen Instituts, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Germany, 29 September–2 October 2021

Deadline: 10 May 2020

The Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 6th Forum Medieval Art, Kunstgeschichtlichen Instituts, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, September 29–October 2, 2021. The biannual colloquium is organized by the Deutsche Verein für Kunstwissenschaft e.V.

The theme for the 6th Forum Medieval Art is Senses. The arts and the senses have always been reciprocally related to one another. In the Middle Ages, sensual encounters with art and architecture offered a variety of ways to perceive, comprehend and structure the world. Pledging to relics enclosed in precious reliquaries, incorporating color from Byzantine icons, distinguishing the holy space by swinging golden polished censers, wearing inwardly decorated jewelry on the body or ringing the church bells to make audible the presence of God – such actions leave no doubts about the significance of the senses in the Middle Ages, and furthermore bring to light the role of art within such operations.

Although the senses and their interplay are well defined in theoretical treatises, theories are of limited use when it comes to understanding the sensual perception of images, objects, and spaces. While, for instance, the knowledge of God is described as a dematerialized act, the senses were nevertheless used to obtain and mediate spiritual insight. Since antiquity, seeing has been the dominant sense, as the works of authors such as Aristotle, Plato, Augustine and Isidore of Seville suggest. This privileged position was further ascribed by cultural and art historical research over a long period of time. Nevertheless, in recent years, studies on materiality have argued that the dominance of this one singular sense misrepresents the multisensory nature of medieval art. The ‘close-up’ senses such as tasting and touching are as essential for the understanding of artefacts as the ‘distant’ senses of seeing, hearing and smelling. In particular, liturgical and courtly ceremonies offer convincing evidence that processes of production and reception are related to multisensory experiences. The role of the senses in the architecture and decoration of sacred space has been revaluated not only within Latin Europe and the Byzantine Empire, but also within Islamic dominated regions. Furthermore, in order to comprehend the codex, one of the leading media throughout the Middle Ages, questions of sensual perception through tasting and sometimes kissing of its different elements such as parchment and paper, as well as textiles, leather, metal and ivory have also proved to be essential.

For the 6th Forum Kunst des Mittelalters, the organizers anticipate discussions on the role of sensual perception and the interplay of senses in medieval image and object cultures as well as in architecture, including topics from interreligious and cross-cultural perspectives. Studies on individual senses and the ways in which they played, guided, deceived and disturbed sensual perception are welcome, as well as proposals which privilege a multisensory and synesthetic approach. Proposals that discuss the methodological challenges that arise from these perspectives are encouraged. Furthermore, which possibilities do digital methods offer for understanding historical contexts of perception, e.g. through virtual reality or the reconstruction of auditive and oratorical spaces? This includes studies on the increasing popularity of multimedia concepts in exhibitions that question how the historicity of sensual approaches could be represented and, beyond that, how it could help to reveal new interpretative frameworks.

The Mary Jaharis Center invites session proposals that fit within the Senses theme and are relevant to Byzantine studies.Additional information about the Forum Medieval Art is available at https://www.dvfk-berlin.de/.

Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website (https://maryjahariscenter.org/sponsored-sessions/6th-fma). The deadline for submission is May 10, 2020. Proposals should include:

**Title
**Session abstract (500 words)
**Proposed list of session participants (presenters and session chair)
**CV

Applicants will be notified of the status of their proposal by May 22, 2020. The organizer of the selected session is responsible for submitting the session proposal to the Forum by June 1, 2020.

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse will reimburse a maximum of 5 session participants (presenters and session chair) up to $300 maximum for residents of Germany, up to $600 maximum for EU residents, and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from outside Europe. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.