Call for Papers: Celebrations in the eastern Mediterranean: private and public

Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies, University of Birmingham, 1 June 2019

Deadline: 7 April 2019

We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers in celebration of the 20th Postgraduate Colloquium of the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies at the University of Birmingham,UK.

Papers and posters are invited for the 20th Annual Postgraduate Colloquium at the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies. From antiquity to the present peoples in the eastern Mediterranean have taken part in celebrations and ceremonies. These vary from large-scale public events to private and personal rituals. As we continue to take part in social rituals derived from these traditions and develop new ways to manifest them it is important to examine these celebrations in detail. The colloquium aims to approach the subject from a variety of perspectives on how people experience celebrations across the eastern Mediterranean from late antiquity to the modern day, from textual sources to visual culture and archaeology.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:
– Feast days and holidays
– Processions
– Secular and religious ceremonies
– Gift Giving
– Secular and religious ceremonies
– Festivals
– Anniversaries, holidays, weddings
– Spaces and Objects
– Celebrations in texts and arts

Papers of approximately 20 minutes or posters (A3 format) related to any of the fields covered by Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies are welcome. Please submit abstracts of no more than 250 words no later than the Sunday 7th April 2019 to 2019CBOMGSColloquium@gmail.com. A selection of papers will be published in the proceedings on the online journal Diogenes (https://gemuob.wordpress.com/diogenes/)

Further information can be found on the conference webpage: https://gemuob.wordpress.com/annual-colloquium-3/

Come and celebrate with us!

Call for Papers: 45th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference (BSC 2019)

Madison, Wisconsin, USA, 17-20 October 2019

Deadline: 25 February 2019

The Forty-fifth annual Byzantine Studies Conference (BSC) will be held in Madison, Wisconsin, from Thursday evening, October 17, through Sunday afternoon, October 20, 2019. For information on BSANA, please consult the BSANA website, http://www.bsana.net.

The BSC is the annual forum for the presentation and discussion of papers on every aspect of Byzantine Studies and on related topics relevant to the field. Conference attendance is open to all, regardless of nationality or academic status.

The BSC is also the occasion of the annual business meeting of the Byzantine Studies Association of North America (BSANA). All conference attendees are warmly encouraged to attend and participate in the annual BSANA business lunch and meeting, which will be conducted on Saturday, October 19th.

For details, download the Call for Papers BSC 2019.

Call for Papers: Late Antique Textualities

Society for Classical Studies, Washington, D.C., USA, 2-5 January 2020

Deadline: 23 February 2019

In Latin, textus can mean a piece of weaving. Late antiquity is well thought of as a text or a collocation of texts in which many strands are woven together— strands of the old (the Classical past, old genres, persisting aspects of material culture) and strands of the new (Christianity, new or hybridized written genres, new or hybridized elements in material culture or the built environment). At the meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in Washington, D.C., January 2–5, 2020, the Society for Late Antiquity will sponsor a session on the various textualities in late antiquity.
We are looking for papers on textuality in either written texts or material culture. Papers can consider issues of textuality in late-ancient written texts, e.g., language, intertextuality with prior written texts (pagan or Christian), or even genre. Potential panelists could also propose papers that consider textuality in material culture or the built environment, e.g., aesthetics, building styles, or methods that weave together old and new. We also encourage prospective panelists to construe the term textuality broadly and propose papers that transcend and/or question the options enumerated here.

Abstracts for papers requiring a maximum of 20 minutes to deliver should be sent no later than February 23, 2019 by email attachment to Colin Whiting at cwhiting@ascsa.org. All submissions will be judged anonymously by two referees. Prospective panelists must be members in good standing of the SCS at the time of submission and must include their membership number in the cover letter accompanying their abstract. Please follow the SCS’s instructions for the format of individual abstracts: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/guidelines-authors-abstracts. The submission of an abstract represents a commitment to attend the 2020 meeting should the abstract be accepted. No papers will be read in absentia and the SLA is unable to provide funding for travel to Washington, D.C.

Conference: Processions: Urban Ritual in Byzantium and Neighboring Lands

Byzantine Studies Symposium, Dumbarton Oaks Music Room, Washington DC, USA, 12-13 April 2019

Military, civic, and religious processions were hallmarks of the ancient and medieval world; they continued into the Renaissance and, indeed, continue to this day. Yet the Byzantine procession has not yet been subjected to any synthetic, historicizing, contextualizing, or comparative examination.

Understanding processions is critical for our appreciation of how urban space worked and was manipulated in the Middle Ages. For the 2019 Dumbarton Oaks Byzantine Symposium, speakers will examine texts, artifacts, and images in order to develop a new understanding of medieval urban life across multiple social registers. For example, records of processions show us what kinds of public behavior were acceptable, and when, and where. Studying processions introduces us to new protagonists as well, for processions involve audiences as well as participants, and groups hitherto virtually invisible, such as the team of people who prepared for the event by decorating the streets, will be brought to light. The Byzantine commitment to processions is striking in terms of the resources and time allocated: there were as many as two processions a week in Constantinople, many involving the patriarch and the emperor. In the Latin West, the Crusader States, and in the Fatimid, Ottoman, and Muscovite worlds, by comparison, processions occurred far less frequently: the procession was significantly more important to the Byzantines than to their neighbors and successors. The comparative study of Byzantine processions to be offered by the speakers at the symposium will reveal how the Byzantines operated in a complex global network defined by local contexts, how the Byzantines positioned themselves within this network, and the nature of the Byzantine legacy to the Islamic, Catholic, and Orthodox inheritors of their culture.

For further infromation, see https://www.doaks.org/research/byzantine/scholarly-activities/processions.

Conference: Eclecticism at the Edges

Eclecticism at the Edges: Medieval Art and Architecture at the Crossroads of the Latin, Greek, and Slavic Cultural Spheres (c.1300-c.1550)

Princeton University, USA, 5-9 April 2019

In response to the global turn in art history and medieval studies, “Eclecticism at the Edges” explores the temporal and geographic parameters of the study of medieval art, seeking to challenge the ways in which we think about the artistic production of Eastern Europe from the fourteenth through the sixteenth centuries. This event will serve as a long-awaited platform to examine, discuss, and focus on the eclectic visual cultures of the Balkan Peninsula and the Carpathian Mountains, the specificities, but also the shared cultural heritage of these regions. It will raise issues of cultural contact, transmission, and appropriation of western medieval and Byzantine artistic and cultural traditions in eastern European centers, and consider how this heritage was deployed to shape notions of identity and visual rhetoric in these regions that formed a cultural landscape beyond medieval, Byzantine, and modern borders.

For full information, see https://ima.princeton.edu/conferences/. Note that the symposium is free but reigstration is necessary to guarantee a place.

Conference: Travelling Saints in Byzantium

Newcastle University, 22 February 2019

Travel (in its many forms, ranging from pilgrimage to forced displacement) is a noticeable feature of hagiographic accounts of the Byzantine period. Lives of saints couch diverse stories of geographic mobility, from those of itinerant or vagrant holy men and women, who willingly embrace travel as a way of life and a particular form of humility, to those of displaced monks, who are forcefully driven from their spiritual abodes. Byzantine hagiographic sources thus provide considerable material that would repay investigation within the renewed scholarly interest in Byzantine travel literature. This workshop, therefore, aims at exploring travel in Byzantium in connection to Byzantine ideals of sainthood, as reflected in hagiographic compositions. It brings together early career researchers and senior scholars working on Byzantine literature in general, and especially hagiography, in order to explore and address a set of questions related to monastic mobility.

For more information on the workshop programme and abstracts, please visit https://research.ncl.ac.uk/travellingsaints/.

Call for Papers: 6th Salzburg International Conference on Syriac Christianity in China and Central Asia

Center for the Study of the Christian East (ZECO) and the Archaeological Institute of Kazakhstan Academy of Sciences / Department of Nestorian Studies, Almaty, Kazakhstan, 20-27 June 2019

Deadline: 1 March 2019

We invite paper proposals on all aspects of Syriac Christianity in China and Central Asia. Papers should be original, concise and to the point. They should take 20 minutes to deliver and be presented in English.

Registration: Please download and fill out this reply form including an abstract (100-150 words) and submit it to Salzburg3.conf@sbg.ac.at before March 1, 2019

Registration Fee (mandatory): € 85. This covers lunch, coffee breaks, rent of the conference room, technical facilities, conference folders, photocopies, administration fees etc.

Excursion (Optional): For those who want to participate in our 2-day excursion, there will be a ticket charge of €55 per person. The ticket covers tour bus, admissions, accommodations incl. breakfast.

Extra Information: Kevin White, head of the Department of Nestorian Studies, has written an introduction letter for you to get better acquainted with the newly formed department that has the privilege to host this conference. This letter also gives more information pertaining to the field trips on the 24th and 25th of June. You can view or download a copy of this letter here.

Details regarding payment, visas and hotel bookings can be viewed here.

Call for Papers: Late Antique Textualities

Society for Classical Studies, Washington, D.C., USA, 2-5 January 2020

Deadline: 23 February 2019

Sponsored by the Society for Late Antiquity
Organizer: Colin Whiting, American School of Classical Studies at Athens

In Latin, textus can mean a piece of weaving. Late antiquity is well thought of as a text or a collocation of texts in which many strands are woven together— strands of the old (the Classical past, old genres, persisting aspects of material culture) and strands of the new (Christianity, new or hybridized written genres, new or hybridized elements in material culture or the built environment). At the meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in Washington, D.C., January 2–5, 2020, the Society for Late Antiquity will sponsor a session on the various textualities in late antiquity.

We are looking for papers on textuality in either written texts or material culture. Papers can consider issues of textuality in late-ancient written texts, e.g., language, intertextuality with prior written texts (pagan or Christian), or even genre. Potential panelists could also propose papers that consider textuality in material culture or the built environment, e.g., aesthetics, building styles, or methods that weave together old and new. We also encourage prospective panelists to construe the term textuality broadly and propose papers that transcend and/or question the options enumerated here.

Abstracts for papers requiring a maximum of 20 minutes to deliver should be sent no later than February 23, 2019 by email attachment to Colin Whiting. All submissions will be judged anonymously by two referees. Prospective panelists must be members in good standing of the SCS at the time of submission and must include their membership number in the cover letter accompanying their abstract. Please follow the SCS’s instructions for the format of individual abstracts here. The submission of an abstract represents a commitment to attend the 2020 meeting should the abstract be accepted. No papers will be read in absentia and the SLA is unable to provide funding for travel to Washington, D.C.

Call for papers: Narration in Byzantium: Synchronic and Diachronic Narratological Perspectives

3rd Byzantine Colloquium of the University of Buenos Aires, Section of Medieval Philology – Institute of Classical Philology, Faculty of Philosophy and Literature, University of Buenos Aires, 29–30 August 2019

Deadline: 31 May 2019

The last years have witnessed a surge of narratological studies focusing on the vast Byzantine literary and artistic production, a recent example being the volume Storytelling in Byzantium. Narratological Approaches to Byzantine Texts and Images (ed. Ch. Messis – M. MulleJ – I. Nilsson). Today, Byzantinists apply sophisticated narratological techniques not only to narrative texts, but also to images and, in line with M. Fludernik’s theory, to non-narrative texts. A common language and a shared theoretical framework would be instrumental in making Byzantine narratological studies more unitary, in fostering the transdisciplinary dialogue with other fields of research, such as Classical, Medieval and Renaissance Studies, and in popularizing it among wider audiences.

In that context, the present colloquium wishes to provide Byzantinists and specialists in other disciplines with a forum of discussion and reflection on the narratological tools applied to their respective corpora, in order to conceptualize the specificity (or absence thereof) of Byzantine narration, from a synchronic and diachronic point of view, and to compare it, utilizing well-stablished and shared analytical categories, with other literary and artistic productions, contemporary or not.

We invite 20-minute papers on any topic pertinent to narrative in Byzantium in the widest sense. Please send your abstract no later than May 31, 2019 to tomas.fernandez@conicet.gov.ar, pablo.a.cavallero@gmail.com and reinhart.ceulemans@kuleuven.be.

Abstracts should 1000 characters or less (blank spaces included, but not counting bibliographical references), and should clearly state the hypothesis, goals and (expected) conclusions of the presentation.

Attendance of the conference will amount to 30 US$ ($500 for Argentina residents; $400 for members of SAEMED, AADEC or CAEBIZ). For students, doctoral students and research assistants, attendance is free.

Papers must be sent no later than July 19, 2019. 8 pp. Palatino Linotype 11; space between lines: 1½. Margins: 2 cm