Summer School: Lincoln College Summer School of Greek Palaeography

Lincoln College, Oxford, 27 July-1 August 2020

Deadline: 15 January 2020

The eighth Lincoln College International Summer School in Greek Palaeography will be held on 27 July – 1 August 2020. The school offers a five-day introduction to the study of Greek manuscripts through ten reading classes, three library visits and five thematic lectures.

Costs: The school does not charge student fees. However, any faculty members admitted to the school may be charged a small fee to defray costs. Participants are individually responsible for their transportation and living expenses in Oxford. A few bursaries, covering housing (but no board), will be awarded to particularly deserving applicants.

The eighth Lincoln College International Summer School in Greek Palaeography will be held on 27 July – 1 August 2020. The school offers a five-day introduction to the study of Greek manuscripts through ten reading classes, three library visits and five thematic lectures.

Costs: The school does not charge student fees. However, any faculty members admitted to the school may be charged a small fee to defray costs. Participants are individually responsible for their transportation and living expenses in Oxford. A few bursaries, covering housing (but no board), will be awarded to particularly deserving applicants.

For full details, see https://www.lincoln.ox.ac.uk/Greek-Palaeography-About.

Job: Postdoctoral Researcher

Ghent University, Belgium

Deadline: 20 December 2019

The ERC-funded research group Novel Saints. Studies in Ancient Fiction and Hagiography of the Department of Literary Studies at Ghent University (Belgium) is seeking a specialist in hagiography to work as a Database Coordinator. The Principal Investigator is Prof Dr Koen De Temmerman.

The successful applicant will start employment in 2020. In order to be eligible, candidates must have obtained their PhD degree at the time of application or demonstrate convincingly that they will have that degree in hand by the start of their employment. Applicants should have a PhD degree on the subject of late antique and/or medieval Christian hagiography (or a related field) in one or more of the following languages: Arabic, Armenian, Coptic, Ethiopic, Georgian, Greek, Latin, Slavonic and/or Syriac. Scholars whose expertise is in one or more of the eastern languages in this list are particularly encouraged to apply. Only scholars who have had their PhD for fewer than six years may apply for this position. Good IT-skills are required.

The (online) database charts stories of erotic love and desire in hagiographical narratives in a variety of late antique and medieval languages. The researcher will contribute new entries to the database, identify and explore areas for further development, coordinate the progress of the database, work with other contributors (both external and internal) and liaise with the publisher about the print version of the database. He/she will also actively participate in publications, either as author or as co-author together with the PI and/or other team members.

For full application details, see https://www.novelsaints.ugent.be/news/vacancy-postdoctoral-researcher.

Summer School: Dumbarton Oaks/HMML Syriac and Armenian Summer School 2020

Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota, USA, 13 July-7 August 2020

Deadline: 15 February 2020

Dumbarton Oaks in collaboration with the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML) announces two intensive four-week language courses: Intermediate Syriac and Introduction to Classical Armenian.

The programme, sponsored and funded by Dumbarton Oaks, will be hosted at HMML, located on the campus of Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota. The summer school will run from July 13 to August 7, 2020. The audience is doctoral students or recent PhDs who can demonstrate a need for Syriac or Armenian in their research.

For those applying for Introductory Classical Armenian, no prior knowledge is expected but some preparation as directed by the instructors will be required before arrival. Those with significant prior study of Aremenian (e.g., a semester-long class) will not be considered. Following this intensive course, students will be able to continue reading on their own or to enter reading courses at other institutions.

The courses will also include an introduction to paleography and to the study and use of manuscripts, especially those now available in the vHMML Reading Room from HMML’s vast collection of digitized manuscripts.

Approximately ten places will be available for each course. Costs for tuition, housing, and meals will be covered by Dumbarton Oaks. The selected participants will be responsible for their own travel costs to and from Saint John’s University. The deadline for applications is February 15, 2020.

For further information, see http://hmml.org/events/summer-courses/.

Fellowship: Bodleian Libraries Visiting Fellowships

University of Oxford

Deadline: 1 December 2019

The Bodleian Libraries are now accepting applications for Visiting Fellowships for the 2020-21 academic year. Proposals are invited from researchers who will benefit from an uninterrupted period of research in the Special Collections of the Bodleian Libraries. The deadline for applications is 1 December 2019.

· Humfrey Wanley Fellowships: supporting a short period of research in the Special Collections of the Bodleian Libraries. Up to 3 months.
· Sassoon Visiting Fellowships: supporting a short period of research in the Special Collections of the Bodleian Libraries. Up to 3 months.
· Sassoon Visiting Fellowships in South Asian and Black History: offered in collaboration with Somerville College, Oxford, for research into the histories of South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean, as well as their diasporas broadly defined. Up to 2 months.
· Bahari Visiting Fellowships in the Persian Arts of the Book: up to 6 months.
· Byrne-Bussey Marconi Fellowships: for research into any aspect of the history of science, technology and business innovation using the archive, manuscript, object and rare book collections of the Bodleian Libraries and the History of Science of Museum, Oxford. Up to 6 months.
· David Walker Memorial Fellowships in Early Modern History: supporting research into any aspect of Early Modern History. Up to 3 months.
· Albi Rosenthal Visiting Fellowships in Music: providing for research in the Special Collections of Music in the Bodleian Libraries. Up to 3 months.

For more information, see https://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/csb/fellowships.

Fellowship: Byzantine Studies Postdoctoral Fellowship 2020-21

Medieval Institute University of Notre Dame, IN, USA

Deadline: 1 February 2020

Following substantial investment in the area of Byzantine Studies at the University of Notre Dame, including the acquisition of the Milton V. Anastos Library of Byzantine Civilization and generous support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Medieval Institute at the University of Notre Dame is delighted to invite applicants for a nine-month Postdoctoral Fellowship in Byzantine Studies. This fellowship is designed for junior scholars with a completed doctorate whose research deals with some aspect of the Byzantine world. The fellow is expected to pursue promising research towards scholarly publication and/or the development of new subject areas. This Fellowship is open to qualified applicants in all fields and sub-disciplines of Byzantine Studies, such as history (including its auxiliary disciplines), archaeology, art history, literature, theology, and liturgical studies, as well as the study of Byzantium’s interactions with neighboring cultures. The fellowship holder will pursue research in residence at the University of Notre Dame’s famed Medieval Institute during the academic year.

The intent of this Fellowship is to enable its holder to do innovative research drawing on the rich resources held in the Milton V. Anastos Collection, the Medieval Institute, and the Hesburgh Library more broadly. This may include the completion of book manuscripts and articles, work on text editions, or the development of new trajectories of research in one of the aforementioned fields. The Fellowship carries no teaching responsibilities, but the fellow will have the opportunity to participate in the multidisciplinary activities of Notre Dame faculty related to Byzantium, Eastern Christianity, and the history of the Levant. The Fellow will be provided with a private workspace in the Medieval Institute, enjoy full library and computer privileges, and have access to all the Institute’s research tools.

In addition, towards the conclusion of the fellowship period the fellow’s work will be at the center of a workshop organized within the framework of the Byzantine Studies Seminar. Senior scholars, chosen in cooperation with the Medieval Institute, will be invited for this event treating the fellow’s subject matter. The senior scholars will discuss draft versions of the fellow’s book manuscript or articles or discuss the further development of ongoing research projects.

Qualifications: Byzantine Studies fellows must hold a Ph.D. from an internationally recognized institution. The Ph.D. must be in hand by the beginning of the fellowship term.

Application Instructions: Applicants should submit a letter of application (cover letter), a project proposal of no more than 2500 words, a current C.V., and three letters of recommendation. Applicants will also complete an informational sheet in Interfolio. To apply, see here.

Call for Papers: Theandrites: Byzantine Philosophy and Christian Platonism (284-1453)

International Society of Neoplatonic Studies Conference, Athens, Greece, 10-14 June 2020

Deadline: 1 February 2020

This panel focuses on the reception of Platonism in the Christian philosophy of the Byzantine era (4th-15th centuries), an era marking the creation of a unique dialogue between Hellenic Platonism and the theology of the Church Fathers and Byzantine Christians.

The panel is open to all issues relating to Byzantine Platonism. This includes: Christians in the Greek-speaking East and their relationship to the Latin tradition in the West, as well as the Christian Platonism found in contemporary church fathers, the Greek-speaking Christians in late antique Gaza, Athens, and Alexandria; the philosophical theology of Pseudo-Dionysius, Maximus, and John Damascene; the later reception of Platonic theories on the soul, time, and eternity, and metaphysics, as well as ritual among Greek Christians and Hellenes. We welcome papers that trace Platonic ideas, terminology, and methodology as they move throughout the Eastern Roman Empire and the Byzantine Orthodox world.

300 word abstract should be sent to Sarah Wear (swear@franciscan.edu) and Frederick Lauritzen (frederick.lauritzen@new.oxon.org). Papers presented in Athens will be published in the series Theandrites: Studies in Byzantine Philosophy and Christian Platonism (284-1453) (after peer review).

Conference: Venice Dialogues: De-Marginalizing Byzantium

Centro Tedesco di Studi Veneziani/Deutsches Studienzentrum in Venedig, Venice, Italy, 7-8 December 2019

The workshop will explore the question of why Byzantium was and keeps being marginalized within the western academic canon and to a lesser extent in the public discourse. Instead of resurrecting the 19th and early 20th century academic debate known as the ‘Byzantine ques- tion’ (‘Byzantinische Frage’), this workshop examines the historiographical mechanisms and turning points that resulted in the marginalization of Byzantium in art history and related fields.

In an attempt to move past pinpointing single moments of ‘influence’ from Byzantium to the We, the workshop asks why the one hundred-year search to answer the ‘Byzantine question’ was unsuccessful, failing to secure a prominent place for the Eastern Roman Empire within art historical teaching and scholarship. Building on these insights, the workshop will delve into practical aspects, seeking possible places for Byzantium after the end of a linear, chronological art historical canon as described by Hans Belting (Das Ende der Kunstgeschichte: Eine Revision nach 10 Jahren) and others. The talks will focus on historiography and scholarly networks, on questions of collecting, artistic production, national and supranational political thought, and on Byzantium’s place within the boundaries of modern academic disciplines.

For the full programme, see here.

If you would like to attend the workshop, we kindly ask you to register: armin.bergmeier@uni-leipzig.de.

Lecture: Monks, Hermits and the Natural World, 300-650AD

Robin Lane Fox, ‘Monks, Hermits and the Natural World, 300-650AD’, Saint Catherine Foundation Lecture, Royal Geographical Society, London, 28 November 2019

The holy men and hermits of late antiquity are distinctive features of early Christianity, often linked to its monasteries, including St Catherine’s of Sinai. This lecture considers the realities and textual representations of their relations with animals, landscapes, birds and plants. It contrasts the use and presentation of such items in pagan history, literature and philosophy.

Robin Lane Fox is Emeritus Fellow of New College, Oxford. His books include Pagans and Christians and Augustine: Conversions to Confessions, the 2016 Wolfson History Prize winner. His new book, on early Greek medicine, will be published in 2020.

The lecture will take place from 19:00 – 20:15 at the Royal Geographical Society, 1 Kensington Gore, Kensington, London SW7 2AR.

To purchase tickets, see here.

Lecture: Byzantium and Scotland

University of Edinburgh, 20 November 2019

The Inaugural Lecture by Professor Niels Gaul (University of Edinburgh) on ‘Byzantium and Scotland’ will be held in Lecture Theatre G03, 50, George Street, Edinburgh. The date and time are unchanged: Wednesday, 20th November, 2019 at 1715 hrs, followed by a Reception. This is a Public Lecture; all are welcome.

Summer School: German for Students of Classical Studies

University of Cologne, Germany, 8-17 June 2020

Deadline: 31 January 2020

The Department for Classical Studies of the University of Cologne is now accepting applications for the 2020 “German for Students of Classical Studies” summer course. The course will take place from June 8 to July 17, 2020. It is specially designed to meet the lingustic needs of students of Classics who wish to expand their knowledge of written and spoken academic German.

The program includes a language class, reading tutorials, field trips to archaeological sites in the Rhineland and the opportunity to take part in the academic life of the Classics department of the University of Cologne.

The deadline for applications is January 31, 2020. All the relevant information, including a flyer for download, can be found here. If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to send an e-mail to: german-for-classics@uni-koeln.de.