AGAPE: Mapping Greek Patristics in the Early Modern Book World

AGAPE Launch: Mapping Greek Patristics in the Early Modern Book World

14 October 2022 marked the official launch of AGAPE, a new open-access database which maps the reception of the Greek Church Fathers in print throughout early modern Europe. AGAPE represents the main outcome of the four-year FNS Ambizione project The Greek Imprint on Europe: Patristics and Publishing in the Early Swiss Reformation, based at the Institut d’histoire de la Réformation, University of Geneva.

agapepatristics.net

In contrast to the Renaissance interest in the pagan Antiquity and classical literature, the highly significant rediscovery of the Greek Fathers remains untold and largely understudied. The number of inaccuracies in the regional, national and collective online repertoires available at present turns bibliographical research into a time-consuming and little-rewarding exercise, severely affecting the development of the subject.

To tackle this issue, AGAPE records any edition of Greek patristic works printed in Europe from 1465 to 1600 in the original language, as well as in Latin and vernacular translations. AGAPE refines the available data and substantially improves their level of detail: not only does it link each work to the ID of the Clavis Patrum Graecorum (CPG), the standard authority in the field, but also thoroughly describes all contents (text as well as paratext) and strictly relies on the analysis of at least one copy of each edition.

AGAPE currently provides access to all editions printed in the fifteenth century (c. 310). Data related to the sixteenth century will be disclosed decade by decade (1501-1510, 1511-1520, 1521-1530 etc.) to ensure reliability.

Users are encouraged to give their feedback and suggestions through the AGAPE email address available in the colophon of the website homepage.

Zooming in on Byzantine Cities

The Institut Français d’Études Anatoliennes d’Istanbul (IFEA), in collaboration with the Department of History, the Department of Archaeology and the Program in Cultures, Civilizations and Ideas at Bilkent University, the Department of Art History at Hacettepe University, ANAMED and Byzantium at Ankara organized a lecture series in Fall 2022 with the title “Zooming in on Byzantine Cities: Αἱ ἀληθείαι τῶν πόλεων.”

The next event of the series will be held online on 25 November 2022. You can join via Zoom on the day of the event (https://zoom.us/j/3899516358).

The language of the event is English. The first session of the event will start at 10:15 with the session entitled “Cities of the Byzantine Heartland,” in which Zeliha Demirel Gökalp (Anadolu University), Jenny Albani (independent scholar), Suna Çağaptay (Bahçeşehir University) and Anais Lamesa (IFEA) will participate. While for the second session, “Urbanism in the Insular and Coastal Koine,” Akın Ersoy (İzmir Katip Çelebi University), Paul Arthur (University of Lecce & Society of Italian Medieval Archaeology) and Luca Zavagno (Bilkent University) will join the event.

The series will continue with further lectures. For the full program of the series, go to https://anamed.ku.edu.tr/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/ZOOMING-IN-ON-BYZANTINE-CITIES.pdf

Journal: After Constantine

“After Constantine” is a peer-reviewed and open-access academic journal and it is published online once a year. Its purpose is to bring Late Antiquity to the spotlight by hosting papers that underline its importance to classic and byzantine studies and contribute to a better piece of knowledge in the academic community.

Our journal encourages the ecumenical dialogue between historical, archaeological, and theological subjects around the Late Antique and Early Byzantine period, especially in the East. The academic team of the journal consists of scholars of different academic backgrounds (philology, archaeology, history, paleography), constructing in that way its interdisciplinary profile and supporting the submission of relevant papers. With the combination of the interdisciplinary character and the online and open-access feature of the journal, we attempt to re-introduce Late Antiquity to the contemporary world and enrich the academic bibliography.

“After Constantine” is hosted and published by the Orthodox Academy of Crete (OAC), an entity that operates under the spiritual auspices of His All Holiness the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople.

For further details, see https://www.afterconstantine.com/

Call for Papers: 2nd Online Edinburgh Byzantine Book Festival

The Edinburgh Byzantine Book Festival is the only one of its kind as a way to learn about recently published books on any area of Late Antique and Byzantine Studies (AD ca.300–ca.1500), including literature, history, archaeology, and material culture. The Festival is an online event, allowing attendees from all over the world to join in. It takes place every two years in order to promote a wider understanding and awareness of Byzantine scholarship in a spirit of collegiality. It is also intended to encourage future collaborations and networking among the various presenters and attendees.

The Second Online Edinburgh Byzantine Book Festival (9-12 March 2023) includes volumes published in 2021 and 2022, and forthcoming books with an estimated publication date no later than June 2023. There is no restriction as regards the original language of the book, but all presentations will be in English.

If you are an author of a monograph (including editions, commentaries, and translations of primary sources), on Late Antique and Byzantine studies, please complete the form and send it in Word version to Petros Bouras-Vallianatos (petros.bouras-vallianatos@ed.ac.uk) by 1 December 2022. Please note that we do not accept edited volumes, volumes that include a collection of previously published articles (e.g. variorum), reprints, re-editions or new paperback editions. Each author can present up to one book.

Recordings of the 1st Festival’s talks are available on YouTube.

Zooming in on Byzantine cities: Αἱ ἀληθείαι τῶν πόλεω

Hybrid lecture series: 15 October – 17 December 2022

The Institut Français d’Études Anatoliennes d’Istanbul (IFEA) in collaboration with the Department of History, the Department of Archaeology and the Program in Cultures, Civilizations and Ideas at Bilkent University, the Department of Art History at Hacettepe University, ANAMED-Koç University, and Byzantium at Ankara is happy to announce a HYBRID lecture series in Fall 2022 with the title “Zooming in on Byzantine cities: Αἱ ἀληθείαι τῶν πόλεων.”

This conference aims to provide an interdisciplinary and critical investigation of cities in Byzantium, drawing on the material, literary, epigraphic, archaeological, environmental, and geospatial evidence. We will examine Byzantine cities through a series of thematic sessions centered on the daily life of the city, its infrastructure, and built environment, as well as the relationship between the Byzantine heartland and its coastal and insular koine, urban cultural history, and symbolic spaces, and finally, Byzantine cities as seen and perceived by ‘the other.’

The series will start on 15 October with the session entitled Cities: Material Remnants as divided into two panels which will see the participation of Kerem Altug (IBB), Michael Jones (Koç University), Jorge Quiroga (Universidad Autonoma de Madrid), and Natalia Poulou-Papadimitriou (University of Thessaloniki) and Koray Durak (Bogazici University), and Jim Crow (University of Newcastle) as respondents.

The series will continue with further workshops to be hosted by ANAMED-Koç University (26 November), Hacettepe University (8 December), and Bilkent University (17 December).

Each panel will host two scholars in conversation on the topic in question. After a brief presentation (20 minutes maximum) of the presenter’s main arguments and the historiographical and methodological issues at stake, a respondent will engage with the presenters in a 15-minute dialogue with the respondent. Finally, the three speakers will be all involved in the Q&A session (15-20 mins).

Zoom access: https://zoom.us/j/3899516358

View the full programme.

Exhibition: ‘A Piece of Nature’ Arts & Crafts Perceptions of Nature and the Byzantine Monument

https://nature.bsa.ac.uk/

The relationship between nature and architecture was particularly emphasized by the Arts & Crafts members as an expression of man’s inner-relationship with his natural surroundings. Historical architecture, in particular, had a central role in this interaction between man and the physical world. Medieval architecture, primarily the Gothic cathedral, was admired for its natural forms and the close almost mystical connections that it managed to establish with nature.

Pioneer architects of the British Arts & Crafts movement, such as Robert Weir Schultz and Sidney Barnsley of the British School at Athens BRF Archive, following the example of John Ruskin, William Morris and their Arts & Crafts masters, were among the first to record, document and study surviving Byzantine monuments in the Eastern Mediterranean. Their attitude towards the remains of Byzantine heritage in the region, eloquently reflected in their recordings and, later, publications, demonstrates a pronounced concern, at the footsteps of their masters, for the multiple interconnections between a historic building and its natural surroundings. Byzantine architecture was considered an essential part of the landscape and, vice versa, nature, the physical world, its forms and qualities were reflected in the historic building both in the way it developed as well as in impressive or even minute details in its architecture and decoration.

This exhibition was created for Nature and the Environment: the 53rd Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies, which was planned by the late Dr Ruth Macrides, and it is dedicated to her memory.

New Journal: Journal of Late Antique, Islamic and Byzantine Studies (JLAIBS)

We are pleased to announce the launch of a new journal, Journal of Late Antique, Islamic and Byzantine Studies (JLAIBS), https://www.euppublishing.com/loi/jlaibs, published by Edinburgh University Press. The JLAIBS as a hotspot for interdisciplinary dialogue aims to disseminate new approaches and methodologies that intend to transform our understanding of broader Late Antique and Medieval phenomena, such as knowledge transfer and cultural exchanges, by looking beyond single linguistic traditions or political boundaries. It provides a forum for high-quality articles on the interactions and cross-cultural exchange between different traditions and of the so-called Byzantine Empire and the Islamic world. Thematically, the journal also welcomes submissions dealing individually with Late Antique, Byzantine and Islamic literature, history, archaeology, and material culture from the fourth to the fifteenth century.

Articles should be written in English and can be up to 15,000 words in total length (i.e. including all footnotes, bibliography and any appendices). Submissions to Journal of Late Antique, Islamic and Byzantine Studies should be formatted in accordance with the full JLAIBS style guidelines (https://www.euppublishing.com/pb-assets/Notes_for_Contibutors/JLAIBS_Style_guide-1614190487.pdf), and sent as Word and PDF files to: jlaibs@ed.ac.uk

Editors:

Dr Petros Bouras-Vallianatos (University of Edinburgh)
Dr Marie Legendre (University of Edinburgh)
Dr Yannis Stouraitis (University of Edinburgh)

Editorial board:

Prof. Peter Adamson (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München)
Prof. Gianfranco Agosti (Sapienza Università di Roma)
Assoc. Prof. Corisande Fenwick (University College London)
Prof. Robert Hoyland (New York University)
Prof. Marc Lauxtermann (University of Oxford)
Prof. Maria Mavroudi (University of California, Berkeley)
Prof. Annliese Nef (Université Paris 1 Panthéon)
Prof. Dr Johannes Pahlitzsch (Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz)
Assoc. Prof. Arietta Papaconstantinou (University of Reading)
Assoc. Prof. Maria Parani (University of Cyprus)
Prof. Samuel Rubenson (Lund University)
Assoc. Prof. Kostis Smyrlis (National Hellenic Research Foundation/Athens)
Assoc. Prof. Jack Tannous (Princeton University)
Assoc. Prof. Alicia Walker (Bryn Mawr College, Pennsylvania)

Online Resource: Syrian Architectural Heritage Released on Wikimedia Commons

Dumbarton Oaks

More than 9,700 photographs of Late Roman and Byzantine monuments in Syria are being uploaded to Wikimedia Commons, in keeping with our Access Initiative to make Dumbarton Oaks collections and scholarship more broadly available. In 2016, retired historian Frank Kidner donated photographs he had taken of Syrian sites in the 1980s and 1990s to Dumbarton Oaks. Emphasizing ancient villages in the modern-day province Idlib, west of Aleppo along the border with Turkey, the Frank Kidner Photographs collection documents sites of historical and archaeological significance while capturing scenes of daily life. His poignant photographs of children playing among the nearly 2,000-year-old ruins stand in stark contrast to familiar images of the ongoing refugee and displacement crisis stemming from the Syrian Civil War. Kidner created a comprehensive resource—drawing together topography, evidence of communities that once lived in the region, and architectural details—that is useful for researchers and scholars across a breadth of fields.

Online Resource: Woven Interiors: Furnishing Early Medieval Egypt Catalogue

Dumbarton Oaks

Experience the vibrant colors and array of textures that enlivened interior spaces in early medieval Egypt. Recent exhibition Woven Interiors—a collaboration with The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum—presented rare and fragile masterpieces from major American institutions, including many textiles that had never before been exhibited or had remained in storage for decades. Now, download the digital catalogue free of charge to explore some sixty remarkable pieces. Essays from curators Gudrun Bühl, Sumru Belger Krody, and Dumbarton Oaks Assistant Curator of the Byzantine Collection Elizabeth Dospěl Williams highlight major themes of the exhibition, including aesthetics, sacred imagery, comfort at home, and continuity and change. To purchase a hard copy of the catalogue, contact our Museum Shop.