Call for Papers: 6th Salzburg International Conference on Syriac Christianity in China and Central Asia

Center for the Study of the Christian East (ZECO) and the Archaeological Institute of Kazakhstan Academy of Sciences / Department of Nestorian Studies, Almaty, Kazakhstan, 20-27 June 2019

Deadline: 1 March 2019

We invite paper proposals on all aspects of Syriac Christianity in China and Central Asia. Papers should be original, concise and to the point. They should take 20 minutes to deliver and be presented in English.

Registration: Please download and fill out this reply form including an abstract (100-150 words) and submit it to Salzburg3.conf@sbg.ac.at before March 1, 2019

Registration Fee (mandatory): € 85. This covers lunch, coffee breaks, rent of the conference room, technical facilities, conference folders, photocopies, administration fees etc.

Excursion (Optional): For those who want to participate in our 2-day excursion, there will be a ticket charge of €55 per person. The ticket covers tour bus, admissions, accommodations incl. breakfast.

Extra Information: Kevin White, head of the Department of Nestorian Studies, has written an introduction letter for you to get better acquainted with the newly formed department that has the privilege to host this conference. This letter also gives more information pertaining to the field trips on the 24th and 25th of June. You can view or download a copy of this letter here.

Details regarding payment, visas and hotel bookings can be viewed here.

Call for Papers: Religion and War from Antiquity to Early Modernity: Historical Varieties of a Recurring Nexus

King’s College London, 24-26 June 2019

Deadline: 15 December 2018

The conference, hosted by the Departments of Classics and War Studies, and the Sir Michael Howard Centre for the History of War at King’s College London, will mark the launch of a new international research network Religion and War through the Ages dedicated to exploring the nexus between religion and war as a recurring cross-cultural phenomenon attested in a great variety of historical societies from antiquity to the present and presenting a particularly poignant modern challenge.

What role do religious ideas play in human conflicts? Citing direct divine command or posing as guardians of divine interests, actively seeking divine approval or drawing courage from imagined divine support, armies from ancient times to the present and across diverse regions and cultures, have gone to battle with one another. The conference will investigate specific historical cases and contexts that illustrate the influence of religion on war, from motivation to rules of conduct. Major themes include: the demands of different sets of religious beliefs that in the past provided a cause for war; the conditions under which religious considerations became a dominant force among the reasons for and against war; the role religion played in escalating war or putting limits on violence and how that influence was felt; finally, how religion, in turn, was affected by the conduct of war in past societies.

With wide geographic coverage encompassing the Mediterranean basin, Near East, North Africa, and Europe, and taking Classical Antiquity as a starting point, but looking as far back as the second millennium BCE and forward to the Westphalian settlement of 1648, this conference will be a comparative and cross-cultural exploration of the persistent question about the role of religion in motivating, guiding, and explaining the causes and conduct of war.

Confirmed speakers include: Ian Morris (Stanford), Anthony Spalinger (Auckland), Penny Roberts (Warwick), Amir Gilan (Tel Aviv), Ioannis Stouraitis (Edinburgh), Amira Benison (Cambridge).

Proposals from young researchers and established scholars in all fields of history (from Near Eastern Studies, Classics, Medieval and Byzantine to Early Modern) are now invited for papers of 20 minutes exploring historical cases that fit within the geographic and chronological framework outlined above and explore the influence of religion on war, from motivation and moral justification to rules of conduct. Proposals, of up to 350 words, along with a very brief CV, should be sent to Irene Polinskaya (irene.polinskaya@kcl.ac.uk) by 15 December 2018. Successful applicants will be notified by 15 January 2019. A selection of papers will be considered for publication in peer-reviewed conference proceedings.

Inquiries may be sent to Irene Polinskaya, Alan James (alan.2.james@kcl.ac.uk) and Hans van Wees (h.wees@ucl.ac.uk)

Job: Lecturer in Late Antique Archaeology

University of Edinburgh

Deadline: 7 January 2019

We seek to appoint a specialist in Late Antique Archaeology, broadly understood in terms of period and with a geographical focus on the later Roman Empire, early Byzantium, and the post-Roman Western Mediterranean. The successful candidate will have a track record of internationally excellent publications, proportionate to career stage, and will continue to publish and research at the highest level in this and related disciplines. They will be expected to make a significant contribution to the teaching of late antique archaeology at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, as well as to doctoral supervision and will be expected to collaborate with other Roman archaeologists and other late antique and Byzantine specialists.

For full details, see https://www.vacancies.ed.ac.uk/pls/corehrrecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.jobspec?p_id=046188

Job: Assistant Professor in Byzantine Studies

Central European University (Budapest/Vienna)

Deadline: 15 February 2019

The Department of Medieval Studies at Central European University (CEU) invites applications for the position of Assistant Professor of Byzantine Studies. The successful candidate will be an outstanding researcher and teacher in the field of Byzantine Studies, with the ability to teach subjects and supervise theses at the MA and PhD levels in a broad chronological range from ca. 500 to 1500, or even beyond.

For full details, see CEU’s website.

Call for Papers: Late Antique Textualities

Society for Classical Studies, Washington, D.C., USA, 2-5 January 2020

Deadline: 23 February 2019

Sponsored by the Society for Late Antiquity
Organizer: Colin Whiting, American School of Classical Studies at Athens

In Latin, textus can mean a piece of weaving. Late antiquity is well thought of as a text or a collocation of texts in which many strands are woven together— strands of the old (the Classical past, old genres, persisting aspects of material culture) and strands of the new (Christianity, new or hybridized written genres, new or hybridized elements in material culture or the built environment). At the meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in Washington, D.C., January 2–5, 2020, the Society for Late Antiquity will sponsor a session on the various textualities in late antiquity.

We are looking for papers on textuality in either written texts or material culture. Papers can consider issues of textuality in late-ancient written texts, e.g., language, intertextuality with prior written texts (pagan or Christian), or even genre. Potential panelists could also propose papers that consider textuality in material culture or the built environment, e.g., aesthetics, building styles, or methods that weave together old and new. We also encourage prospective panelists to construe the term textuality broadly and propose papers that transcend and/or question the options enumerated here.

Abstracts for papers requiring a maximum of 20 minutes to deliver should be sent no later than February 23, 2019 by email attachment to Colin Whiting. All submissions will be judged anonymously by two referees. Prospective panelists must be members in good standing of the SCS at the time of submission and must include their membership number in the cover letter accompanying their abstract. Please follow the SCS’s instructions for the format of individual abstracts here. The submission of an abstract represents a commitment to attend the 2020 meeting should the abstract be accepted. No papers will be read in absentia and the SLA is unable to provide funding for travel to Washington, D.C.

Call for Papers: Armenia & Byzantium: Perspectives on Cultural and Political Relations

Graduate and Early Career Workshop, University of Oxford, 22–23 March 2019

Deadline: 15 December 2018

The ‘Armenia & Byzantium: Perspectives on Cultural and Political Relations’ is a two-day workshop which intends to bring together early career researchers working in the fields of Armenian and Byzantine studies and to give them the opportunity to discuss their research with senior specialists in their field. This workshop will continue the successful collaboration between Oxford and Vienna, which began last year in the University of Vienna with the workshop ‘Armenia & Byzantium without Borders’ convened by Dr Emilio Bonfiglio and Professor Claudia Rapp within the framework of ‘Moving Byzantium: Mobility, Microstructure and Personal Agency’ project.

We are pleased to invite advanced PhD candidates and early career researchers working in the fields of Late Antique, Armenian, Byzantine, and Middle Eastern Studies to submit proposals for 20-minute papers connected with the main topics of Armenian-Byzantine relations with a focus on aspects of political and cultural interactions throughout the Middle Ages. We are particularly interested in new research which explores the participation of the Armenians in the Byzantine world and the Byzantine policies which had a direct influence on the Armenians. Each paper presented at the workshop will be accompanied by a senior scholar’s 10-minute response, followed by a general discussion. The workshop will be inaugurated with the lecture of our keynote speaker, Prof. Christina Maranci (Tufts University).

Limited travel grants will be available to assist those who would otherwise be unable to attend. Paper proposals should be sent by 15th December 2018 to David Zakarian. Applications should include: a) university affiliation; b) graduate level; c) title of the paper; d) abstract (max 250 words); e) CV.

Scientific Committee: Dr. David Zakarian (Oxford), Prof. Theo M. van Lint (Oxford), Dr Emilio Bonfiglio (Vienna), and Prof. Claudia Rapp (Vienna)

Call for Papers: Medieval Italy

7th Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Saint Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri, USA, 17-19 June 2019

Deadline: 31 December 2018

We are looking for additional papers and sessions on topics relating to medieval Italy. Current session proposals in need of additional papers include:

– Foundations of Venice in the Early Modern Middle Ages
– Byzantine Influence in Southern Italy (or Exarchate of Ravenna)
– Conflict and Commerce in Northern Italy
– The Communes of Medieval Italy
– Italy in the Medieval Mediterranean

Proposals for papers or sessions beyond those mentioned above are also encouraged. The submission deadline for both sessions proposals and individual papers is December 31.

For more information on the conference and submission instructions, see the conference website at: https://www.smrs-slu.org/.

For questions specifically related to papers and sessions on Medieval Italy, please contact Philip Mazero (phillip.mazero@slu.edu) or Matthew E. Parker (matthew.parker@slu.edu)

Summer School: International Byzantine Greek Summer School

Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, 14 July – 10 August 2019

Deadline: 12 April 2019

The Department of Classics at Trinity College Dublin is delighted to welcome back the International Byzantine Greek Summer School (IBGSS) in July–August 2019. This well-established course, directed by Dr Anthony Hirst in Belfast, Birmingham and Dublin since 2002, teaches Byzantine Greek at Beginners, Intermediate and Advanced level and allows early learners to engage with original medieval and late antique Greek texts from the start.

Course dates:
Level 1 Beginners: 14–27 July 2019
Level 2/2.5 Intermediate: 28 July – 10 August 2019
Level 3 Advanced Reading: 28 July – 10 August 2019

For further information and applications, see http://www.tcd.ie/Classics/byzantine/

Summer School: Byzantine Centres of Magnificence

Oxford University Summer School for Adults, 13-20 July 2019

Apart from Constantinople, the political and cultural capital of the Byzantine empire for over a thousand years, there were other wealthy cities and towns as well as monastic communities in the empire which produced exquisite cultural and artistic products. Using contemporary texts and visual aids, the course will trace the development of Constantinople and certain other Byzantine centres and examine the cultural, artistic and everyday life in those centres from the fourth to the fifteenth century.

The course will be taught by Dr Aphrodite Papayianni, who teaches at the University of London and OUDCE.

Full information regarding the course can be found at: www.conted.ox.ac.uk/courses/byzantine-centers-of-magnificence?code=O18I101MBR

Studentship: Two fully-funded PhD positions in Liturgical Studies

University of Notre Dame, IN, USA

Deadline: 2 January 2019

The Graduate School at the University of Notre Dame accepts up to two, funded PhD candidates per year in Liturgical Studies. The program in Liturgical Studies integrates three sub-disciplines: Liturgical History; Liturgical Theology; Ritual Studies.

The program offers a wide range of research opportunities with particular strengths in early and late antique Christian ritual and material culture, medieval liturgy, Byzantine Christianity, manuscript studies, modern liturgical theology, and ritual studies. Recent dissertations have included topics on ritual at the Second Temple, architecture and liturgy in medieval Salisbury, liturgy and life in Crusader Jerusalem, ritual in Igbo culture, imperial rites for commemorating earthquakes in late antique Constantinople, and ritual and identity in the California Missions.

The Liturgical Studies program was founded in 1947 as the first graduate program in the Department of Theology and quickly grew to become an international center for the study of liturgy. Pioneers in the discipline who have taught at Notre Dame include Josef Jungmann, Louis Bouyer, Robert Taft, Paul Bradshaw, and many others. The program is currently comprised of seven faculty members and represents one of the largest concentrations of liturgical scholars at one place in the world.

In addition to its core strengths, Liturgical Studies offers a variety of opportunities for research collaboration with other institutions at Notre Dame, including the Medieval Institute, the Program in Sacred Music, other departments at the university (esp. History, Anthropology and Sociology) and other programs within the Theology Department, including Christianity and Judaism in Antiquity (CJA), the History of Christianity (HC), and Systematic Theology (ST). The Hesburgh Libraries system has extensive holdings in theology and one of the nation’s largest collections in medieval and Byzantine studies, including the Milton Anastos Collection. The Theology Department also offers a broad range of ancient languages, including courses in Greek, Latin, Syriac, Hebrew, Coptic, Armenian and Ge’ez, with additional opportunities for studying Georgian, Slavonic, and Jewish Aramaic.

All applications must be submitted to the Graduate School by January 2, 2019. More information and a link to the online application may be found here.