Conference: Polities of Faith: Theology, Ecclesiology, and Spatiality in the Christian World

Institute of Classical Studies 2019 Byzantine Colloquium

Room 349/350, Senate House, University of London, 4-5 June 2019

Deadline: 15 May 2019

In 1932 Olof Linton’s dissertation Das Problem der Urkirche in der neueren Forschung overturned the existing consensus that presented the Church as a historical construct that followed the triumph of Christianity. According to Linton, the Church already existed in the minds of the earliest Christian thinkers, who had envisaged a structured community of believers and clerics. More recently, sociologists have similarly responded to previous approaches focused on the efficiency of institutions by emphasizing the key role that intellectual legitimisation plays in the survival of organisational structures. While Late Antique and Medieval historians have underlined the importance of discourse and ritual in the construction of a Christian world-view, there is still much work to be done in assessing how theological and ecclesiological discussions shaped the structure, organisation and on-going development of the Christian Churches. The Colloquium explores this theme bringing together classicists, historians and theologians working on the construction of the Christian Churches from Late Antiquity to the thirteenth century, and beyond:

· James Corke-Webster (London), The Church in Eusebius’ Life of Constantine
· Anthony Dupont (Louvain), Keeping the Church in the middle. Augustine of Hippo’s interrelated theoretical and practical ecclesiology
· Tom Hunt (Birmingham), The Influence of Trinitarian Theology on Jerome’s Hierarchical Ecclesiology in Against Jovinian and Letter 52
· Andrew Jotischky (London), Knowledge, Mediation and Tradition in Thirteenth Century Pilgrimage in the Eastern Mediterranean
· Chrysovalantis Kyriacou (Nicosia), Of monks and bishops: Cypriot clerical networks and the circle of Maximus the Confessor
· Ioannis Papadogiannakis (London), The Body Politic in 6th-7th Byzantium: Religious, Social and Political Implications
· Richard Price (London), One Empire, One Church

For the programme of the Colloquium please click here.

For information and to reserve a place please contact Sapfo.Psani@rhul.ac.uk by 15 May 2019.

Call for Papers: Family Matters

The 5th Annual Conference of the Late Antique and Medieval Postgraduate Society at the University of Edinburgh, Saturday, 15 June 2019

Deadline: 5 April 2019

The Late Antique and Medieval Postgraduate Society (LAMPS) at the University of Edinburgh is hosting a one-day conference on the theme of Family Matters in literature and historical sources from the Late Antique to the start of the Early Modern period. This conference seeks to further our understanding of the roles, values, religious ideals, practices and dynamics of the family during the Late Antique and Medieval periods. It invites us to explore how families, whether aristocratic or not, functioned. It also aims to strengthen interdisciplinary connections within and outside of the University of Edinburgh, including but not limited to the fields of Archaeology, History, Classics, History of Art, Literature, Language Studies, Islamic Studies, and Theology. We welcome submissions for papers on the theme of Family Matters and hope to engage with a wider audience by providing a forum for postgraduate and early career scholars to present their research. Submissions for abstracts may include, but are certainly not limited to:

● Family as portrayed in literature
● Gender roles
● Children and childhood
● The function of religion within everyday life
● Parenthood
● Home and work
● Religious, legal and social issues within the home
● Family and the community
● Monastic families
● Mortality

Early career scholars and postgraduate students are invited to submit abstracts of up to 200 words, as well as a short biography of up to 100 words to lampsedinburgh@gmail.com by Friday, 5 April, 2019

Lecture: Dropping a Medieval Chronicle (and Putting it Back Together): Reading the Byzantine Chronography of Theophanes and George the Synkellos through Manuscripts, Maps, and Text Analysis

Harvard Faculty Club, 20 Quincy Street, Cambridge, MA, USA, 6:15-7:45pm, 28 March 2019

The co-authored early ninth-century Constantinopolitan Chronography of George the Synkellos and Theophanes the Confessor was a much more daring intellectual project than has been conceded. Opening up the Chronography’s complexity invites both the re-deployment of established methods such as close readings and codicological studies, as well as new “digital” approaches such as text analysis and mapping.

This talk will argue that these approaches are not mutually exclusive but both complementary and game-changing for historicized readings of medieval historical texts in general. After outlining an ecumenical approach to the Chronography in particular, I will propose other applications. Beyond a coup for Byzantinsts these methods can rejuvenate study of medieval chronicles in general: they supply a method for rigorous comparative reading and contribute to contemporary debates over historical space and periodization.

Full details at: https://maryjahariscenter.org/events/dropping-a-medieval-chronicle-and-putting-it-back-together

Job: Visiting Assistant Professor of Art History (Greek Art and Architecture)

Stockton University, NJ, USA

The Visual Arts Program at Stockton University invites applications for a one-year Visiting Assistant Professor of Art History beginning September 2019. Ph.D. required (or must have Ph.D. by September 2019) with college-level teaching experience and publications record. The preferred candidate will specialize in Greek art and architecture and have access to an active archaeological project in Greece or Cyprus. Consideration is also given to specialists in Byzantine art and architecture or other ancient specializations. Ability to teach more broadly within art history curriculum and academic experience with culturally diverse populations desired.

The successful applicant will teach courses in area of specialization, two-semester art history survey, and other courses as needed, including courses for the University’s General Studies program. One course in archaeology is required each year with preference given to candidates who can offer summer field work for students. The position includes endowed research funding and support for students traveling abroad established through the Pappas Center for Hellenic Studies. The faculty member will participate in Pappas Center for Hellenic Studies programming on campus and beyond. Teaching load is six four-credit courses per year.

The job is posted here:
https://stockton.hiretouch.com/job-details?jobID=1606&job=visiting-assistant-professor-of-art-history-13d

Call for Papers: True Warriors? Negotiating Dissent in the Intellectual Debate (c. 1100-1700)

9th International Lectio Conference, Leuven, Belgium, 11-13 December 2019

Deadline: 15 April 2019

Dissent, polemics and rivalry have always been at the center of intellectual development. The scholarly Streitkultur was given a fresh impetus by the newly founded universities in the High Middle Ages and later turned into a quintessential part of early modern intellectual life. It was not only mirrored in various well-known intellectual debates and controversies – e.g. between Aristotelians and Augustinians, scholastics and humanists, Catholics and Protestants – but also embodied in numerous literary genres and non-literary modes of expression – e.g. disputationes, invectives, consilia, images, carnivalesque parades, music, etc. – and discursive or political strategies – patronage, networks and alliances. Moreover, the harsh debates notwithstanding, consensus was also actively searched for, both within particular disciplines and within society as a whole.

The aforementioned genres and strategies are all modes of negotiating dissent, which raises several important questions regarding these intellectual ‘warriors’. What were the most important issues at stake and how were they debated? Did the debates in the public sphere reflect the private opinions of the scholars involved? What access do we have to those private opinions? Can we approach such controversies in terms of authenticity and truthfulness, or consistency and coherence? Is there a contrast between ego-documents and the published part of an author’s oeuvre?

Starting from these questions, the aim of this conference is to study the polemical strategies and the modes of rivalry and alliance in scholarly debate from the twelfth through the seventeenth centuries. We actively invite papers from a variety of perspectives and disciplines (civil and canon law, philosophy, theology and religious studies, literary studies, historiography, art history, etc.) and aim to study texts in Latin, Greek and the vernacular, as well as pictorial and performative traditions. We do not only welcome specific case studies, but also (strongly) encourage broader (meta)perspectives, e.g.of a diachronic or transdisciplinary nature. The conference will span the period from the twelfth until the seventeenth centuries.

For full details, see http://lectio.ghum.kuleuven.be/conferences/

Conference: Syriac Worlds: Interactions, Exchanges, Contributions

Brown University, Providence, RI, USA, 16-19 June 2019

The Eighth North American Syriac Symposium will convene at Brown University on June 16-19, 2019. Held every four years since 1991, the North American Syriac Symposium brings together scholars and students for exchange and discussion on a wide variety of topics related to the language, literature, and cultural history of Syriac Christianity, extending chronologically from the first centuries CE to the present day and geographically from Syriac Christianity’s homeland in the Middle East to South India, China, and the worldwide diaspora.

Registration is now open. For details, see https://www.brown.edu/academics/religious-studies/events-0/syriac-symposium

Call for Articles: Frankokratia: A Journal for the Study of Greek Lands under Latin Rule (to appear from 2020)

Frankokratia (Gr. Φραγκοκρατία, or ‘Frankish rule’) is a peer-reviewed scholarly journal committed to publishing original research on all areas of the Greek world where Latin (‘Roman Catholic’) populations from western Europe settled in the aftermath of the crusades. Collectively known as ‘Franks’ in the East irrespective of their exact place of origin, these settlers established shorter- or longer-lived polities on lands formerly belonging to the Byzantine Empire and inhabited by people of the Greek (‘Orthodox’) and various Eastern Christian rites, Jews and Muslims. Although the core focus of the journal lies on the regions conquered in the context of the Third and Fourth Crusades, to embrace the full breadth of this phenomenon the journal’s chronological and geographical scope ranges widely from the conquests of Southern Italy and Antioch in the eleventh century to the fall of the last Venetian colonies in the eighteenth century.

Frankokratia has been conceived as an interdisciplinary forum bringing together innovative work by specialists in archaeology, architecture, art, codicology, culture, diplomacy, economics, language, law, literature, musicology, numismatics, politics, religion, society, theology, war, and all related topics. Moreover, it aspires to bridge the perennial epistemological divide between western medieval and Byzantine studies and to overcome the mutual isolation of specialists on Greece, Cyprus, and other regions, offering a venue for the publication of collaborative research efforts and encouraging the fruitful cross-pollination between these and other fields. The journal welcomes the submission of both broader historiographical surveys and more focused studies, including essays presenting previously unpublished source material in the form of texts and images. This versatility in terms of content and methodology will allow Frankokratia to broach the multifaceted issues raised by the study of the complex societies of the Greco-Latin sphere in a more holistic fashion, helping weave a richer tapestry of the history and culture of the post-classical Mediterranean.

For further information, see: https://brill.com/view/journals/fra/fra-overview.xml