Call for articles: Akropolis: Journal of Hellenic Studies

Akropolis: Journal of Hellenic Studies is an international peer-reviewed, open access scholarly journal, devoted to the study of Hellenic culture and civilization from antiquity to the present, featuring high-quality research articles and book reviews in all areas of Hellenic studies: philosophy, religion, archaeology, history, law, politics, literature, philology, art.

High quality contributions – regardless of tradition, school of thought or disciplinary background – are welcome. The editorial board equally values disciplinary and interdisciplinary studies. The highest editorial standard is ensured by the international character and disciplinary expertise of the editorial board.

Akropolis is published annually by the Center for Hellenic Studies, based in Podgorica, Montenegro.

Papers in all fields of Hellenic studies and dealing with all periods of Greek culture and civilization, as well as comparative studies, are welcome. All submissions will go through a double-blind review process.

Please submit your paper through the online system, following the instructions.

Alternatively, please send your paper via email.

Grant: 2019-2020 Shohet Scholars Grant Program for Research on the Ancient Mediterranean

Deadline: 15 January 2019

The Shohet Scholars Grant Program of the International Catacomb Society is now accepting applications to the Shohet Scholars cohort of 2019-2020. Submission deadline is January 15, 2019 (11:59 p.m. EST).

This annual grant program funds research on the Ancient Mediterranean from the Hellenistic Era to the Early Middle Ages. Shohet Scholars may do their research in the fields of archeology, art history, classical studies, history, comparative religions, or related subjects. Of special interest are interdisciplinary projects that approach traditional topics from new perspectives.

One or more Shohet Scholars will be selected each year. The primary intent of the grant is to support significant, innovative research that can be completed and reported upon within and shortly after the award period. Grants may be made to seed innovative approaches and new ideas or to cover specific expenses or phases of a larger project under the direction of the applicant. At this time, awards in the range of $2,000 to $30,000 will be made. A complete history of past and present Shohet Scholars awards is available on the ICS webpage, www.catacombsociety.org.

Eligibility: Scholars of all institutional affiliations and independent scholars may apply for Shohet Scholar funding if they are individual or institutional members of the ICS at the time of the application submission deadline of January 15, 2019 and in possession of a doctoral degree or the equivalent.

Non-U.S. citizens may apply if a co-applicant is a legal permanent resident (i.e. already in possession of “green card” or Form I-551) or native or naturalized citizen of the U.S.A., meets all eligibility requirements, and has a genuinely collaborative and credited leadership role in the proposal. Co-applicants must submit as individuals all the necessary forms except for the research proposal, list of permissions, and budget proposal, which may be filed jointly.

Deadlines and Decisions: The application deadline for the 2018-2019 academic year is January 15, 2019. The award announcement for the 2019-2020 academic year will be made by May 1, 2019, for funding to be disbursed on 15 July 2019. Please note: starting in 2018, all funding is awarded directly to the USA-based awardee, for distribution among project co-applicants and collaborators. The ICS will no longer wire or transfer money to bank accounts outside of the USA.

Click here for application forms and instructions and here for assistance.

If you have any questions about the suitability of proposed projects, application procedures, or any other matters related to the Shohet Scholars Program, please consult our FAQ page or contact us at shohetscholars (at) catacombsociety.org.

Seminar Series: University of Birmingham Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies 2018/19

The Centre’s General Seminar normally meets in the Whitting Room (436), 4th floor, Arts Building on Thursdays at 5.15pm, unless otherwise stated and is open to all interested in the related concerns of the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies.

AUTUMN TERM 2018

11 Oct: Students of the Centre
Travellers’ Tales

18 Oct: Georgios Chatzelis (Athens)
Invention and reality in Byzantine historical narratives: the impact of Polyaenus and military manuals on the Alexiad of Anna Komnene

25 Oct: Maroula Perisanidi (Leeds)
Equines and the margins of Byzantine power: humility or humiliation?

1 Nov: Cecily Hennessy (London)
Byzantine influence in Winchester Cathedral?

15 Nov: Maria Papadaki (Edinburgh)
Current archaeological research on settlement and provincial life in the Byzantine Mediterranean: the case of the Peloponnese

22 Nov: Paul Magdalino (St Andrews)
The church of St John the Theologian and the End of Antiquity in Constantinople
(Annual SPBS Autumn Lecture)

29 Nov: Marc Baer (London)
Sultans as saviors: early modern Mediterranean Jewish accounts of the Ottoman rulers

6 Dec: Ethan Menchinger (Manchester)
Ottoman dreams of destiny and omens of greatness

13 Dec: Ioulia Kolovou (Glasgow)
Reconfiguring the template: Representations of powerful women in historical fiction — the case of Anna Komnene
(Joint Seminar with CESMA)

SPRING TERM 2019

24 Jan: Alexandra Vukovich (Oxford)
Interpreting the Constantinopolitan landscape: A Rus traveller in Byzantium

31 Jan: Ceyda Karamürsel (London)
Unlikely migrants: slavery, emancipation, and race in the Reform-Era Ottoman Mediterranean

7 Feb: Brian McLaughlin (London)
Kantakouzenos’ daemon: providence and persuasion in late Byzantine historiography

14 Feb: Huw Halstead (St Andrews)
‘Remnants of Byzantium’: the uses of the past by the expatriated Greeks of Turkey

28 Feb: Gonda Van Steen (London)
Greek Adoptees Anonymous: adoption, memory and Cold War Greece

7 Mar: Michael Talbot (London)
Consular networks, shipping routes, and the Ottoman world in the late 19th century

14 Mar: Miltos Pechlivanos (Berlin)
Francis Bacon in Ancient Greek. Nikolaos Mavrokordatos (1680-1730) and cultural mobility

21 Mar: Theofili Kampianaki (Birmingham)
Flavius Josephus in medieval Greek and Latin Histories: some cross-cultural approaches

Seminar Series: CHS 2018-19 Late Antique & Byzantine Seminar Series at King’s College London

Through its regular series of seminars, colloquia, public lectures and international conferences, the Centre for Hellenic Studies is a concentrated force for the advancement of research in all aspects of Hellenic culture.

All its activities are free, open to the public and designed to be accessible to a wide audience.

Semester 1

Convened by Vicky Manolopoulou

Tuesday 25 September, 17.30
Understanding settlements in Byzantine Greece: Old data and new approaches for the Peloponnese (11th -12th eleventh centuries)
K2.29 Council Room
A seminar with Maria Papadaki (University of Edinburgh / University of Patras).

Tuesday 9 October, 17.30
Equines and the margins of Byzantine power: Humility or humiliation?
K2.29 Council Room.
A seminar with Maroula Perisanidi (University of Leeds).

Tuesday 23 October, 17.30
Identifying Medieval burials – what to do with unexpected Byzantines?
River Room
A seminar with Sophie Moore.

Tuesday 13 November, 17.30
Revising the chronology of Late Antique Ephesus: Urban phasing and epigraphic landscapes
K2.29 Council Room.
A seminar with Luke Lavan (University of Kent).

 

Semester 2

Convened by Petros Bouras-Vallianatos

Tuesday 22 January, 17.30
A Rus traveller in Constantinople
K2.29 Council Room.
A seminar with Alexandra Vukovich (University of Cambridge).

Tuesday 5 February, 17.30
Commemorative religious processions in Byzantine Constantinople
K2.29 Council Room.
A seminar with Vicky Manolopoulou (King’s College London).

Tuesday 26 February, 17.30
Approaching Byzantine slavery
K2.29 Council Room.
A seminar with Marek Jankowiak (Oxford).

Tuesday 12 March, 17.30
Foreign trade in the early Byzantine Empire: beyond the Silk Road
River Room
A seminar with Rebecca Darley (Birkbeck).

Tuesday 26 March, 17.30
The earliest traces of Christianisation from northeastern Italy and a newly discovered late antique inscription from Venice
K2.29 Council Room.
A seminar with Lorenzo Calvelli (Venice).

For further information see: https://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/ahri/centres/chs/events/events.aspx

Conference: Gold Glass Memorial Day for Daniel T. Howells

Ioannou Centre for Classical and Byzantine Studies, Oxford, 27 April 2019

A conference, co-hosted by Drs Susan Walker (Oxford University) and Ine Jacobs (Ioannou Centre), in commemoration of the life and work of the late Dr Daniel Howells. Speakers, many of whom knew or worked with Dr Howells, will present papers on the art of ancient gold glass, its historical contexts and influence on later art.

Speakers:

· Giulia Cesarin, “Gold-band glass: from Hellenistic to Roman luxury glass production.”

· Yasoko Fujii, “A Study of Continuity: gold leaf techniques on gold glass. From Hellenistic ‘Kirikane’ to Late Roman ‘Scratching’.”

· Will Lewis, “A Constantinian prince’s guide to religion and culture in the mid-fourth century.”

· Susan Walker, “Craft, consumers and the value of gold-glass in late antique Rome.”

· Lucy Grig, “’Cultures of Conviviality’: thinking about the role of the gold glasses in feasting and conviviality.”

· Eileen Rubery, “Gold glass and the cults of female saints in Rome: whatever happened to the Virgin Mary?”

For online registration, visit the conference’s Eventbrite page.

Call for Papers: Syriac Worlds: Interactions, Exchanges, Contributions

Brown University, Providence, RI, USA, 16-19 June  2019

Deadline: 2 January 2019

The Eighth North American Syriac Symposium will convene at Brown University on June 16-19, 2019. Held every four years since 1991, the North American Syriac Symposium brings together scholars and students for exchange and discussion on a wide variety of topics related to the language, literature, and cultural history of Syriac Christianity, extending chronologically from the first centuries CE to the present day and geographically from Syriac Christianity’s homeland in the Middle East to South India, China, and the worldwide diaspora.

We invite paper proposals for the 2019 Brown Syriac Symposium on the them of Syriac Worlds: Interactions, Exchanges, Contributions.

Throughout its long history, Syriac Christianity has flourished in the midst of other languages, religions, cultures, and societies. However turbulent its circumstances, Syriac has enabled distinctive articulations and cultural expressions for its speakers. Moreover, not only have there been constant interactions, but Syriac has been an active medium of exchange. Contributions, borrowings, adaptations, and innovations have characterized the literary, material, philological, and cultural productions of Syriac speakers from the start. This Symposium welcomes proposals for scholarly papers on all topics that address Syriac in any of its historical time periods, within this broad theme.

Proposals may be submitted either for individual papers or as part of a proposed panel. Individual presentations must be limited to 20 minutes, plus 5 minutes of discussion time. Please submit contact information for the presenter(s) and an abstract of 250-350 words. Those wishing to propose a panel of 3 to 4 papers (4 papers maximum) on a specific theme must submit a separate abstract for each presentation, a title for the panel, and full contact information for all presenters and the session moderator.

All proposals should be submitted electronically to nasyriacsymposium@gmail.com on or before January 2, 2019. Notification of acceptances of paper and panel proposlas will be made in early February, with a view to publishing the program in early March.

For further information, see the conference website.

Call for Papers: Seventh Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies

17-19 June 2019, Saint Louis University, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Deadline: 31 December 2018

The Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies provides a convenient summer venue in North America for scholars in all disciplines to present papers, organize sessions, participate in roundtables, and engage in interdisciplinary discussion. The goal of the symposium is to promote serious scholarly investigation of the medieval and early modern worlds.

We invite proposals for papers, sessions, and roundtables on all topics and in all disciplines of medieval and early modern studies. Proposals from learned societies and scholarly associations are particularly welcome. The deadline for proposals submissions is December 31.

The plenary speakers for this year will be John J. Contreni, of Purdue University, and Maureen C. Miller, of the University of California, Berkeley.

The Symposium is held on the beautiful midtown campus of Saint Louis University, hosted by the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. On-campus housing options include affordable, air-conditioned apartments and a luxurious boutique hotel. Inexpensive dorm meal plans are available.

All sessions take place in state-of-the-art classrooms and auditoriums with complete audiovisual facilities. All sessions, events, meals, and housing are located within easy walking distance of each other. A rich variety of restaurants, bars, and cultural venues are also only a short walk away.

All sessions are 90 minutes long. A variety of session formats are welcome. Preference will be given to organized sessions that involve participants from multiple institutions.

For further information, see the conference website.