Events

SPBS Events

BBPN Events

See the BBPN page for the latest events.

Seminar Series at UK Universities

These are seminars run by UK universities. They are not organised by the Society.



Conferences, Lectures & Calls for Papers (UK)

Medieval Eurabia: Religious Crosspollinations in Architecture, Art and Material Culture during the High and Late Middle Ages (1000-1600)

2018 Annual Conference of the Association for Art History (U.K.)

5-7 April 2018 Courtauld Institute of Art & King’s College London

The coexistence of Christianity and Islam in the Medieval Mediterranean led to a transfer of knowledge in architecture and material culture which went well beyond religious and geographical boundaries. The use of Islamic objects in Christian contexts, the conversion of churches into mosques and the mobility of craftsmen are manifestations of this process. Although studies beginning with Avinoam Shalem’s Islam Christianized (1996), have dealt extensively with Islamic influence in the West and European influence in the Islamic Mediterranean, sacred objects, and material culture more generally, have been relatively neglected. From crosses found in Mosques, to European-Christian coins with pseudo/-shahada inscriptions, medieval material culture is rife with visual evidence of the two faiths co-existing in both individual objects and monuments.

This panel invites papers from scholars working on intercultural exchange in art, architecture and material culture. We particularly welcome contributions that focus on sacred objects that have been diverted or ‘converted’ to a new purpose, whether inside or outside an explicitly religious context. Papers should present original research, which expands the boundaries of knowledge and which the scholars would like to be considered for publication. Abstract should be no more than 250 words long. 

Deadline: 1 November 2017

Panel organised by Sami De Giosa, Oxford University and Nikolaos Vryzidis, British School at Athens

Email: aahchristianmuslimpanel2018@gmail.com


Medieval Monks, Nuns & Monastic Life

21st Biennial Symposium of the IMSSS

15-20 July 2018, University of Bristol

The 2018 IMSSS symposium will explore the breadth and depth of sermon literature and preaching activity relating to monks, nuns, and monastic life, and serve as a microcosm of the religious and cultural landscape of the Middle Ages.

The symposium will be based in the beautiful grounds of the University of Bristol's Wills Hall, and will include a workshop at historic Downside Abbey, with its medieval manuscripts, incunables, and Centre for Monastic Heritage. We will also visit Wells Cathedral, as well as the medieval sites of Bristol.

Keynote speakers include Claudia Rapp and Brian Patrick McGuire.

For full details, see imsss.net/symposium-2018


British Institute at Ankara Lecture in Memeory of Prof Anthony Bryer

7 December 2017, British Academy, London

You are warmly invited to a lecture by Jim Crow, Professor of Archaeology at Edinburgh University, on a subject dear to Bryer’s heart:

“Byzantine Routes and Frontiers in Eastern Pontus and the Hagiographical Dossier of St Eugenios”.

The lecture will take place at 6.30 pm on Thursday 7th December at the Wolfson Auditorium, British Academy, 10 Carlton House Terrace, London SW1Y 5AH.  To book simply requires a visit to www.biaa.ac.uk/events or a call to 0207 969 5204.


Medieval Monks, Nuns and Monastic Life: 21st Biennial Symposium of the IMSSS

Conference/Call for Papers (closes 30 September 2017)

15-20 July 2018, University of Bristol

The 2018 IMSSS symposium will explore the breadth and depth of sermon literature and preaching activity relating to monks, nuns, and monastic life, and serve as a microcosm of the religious and cultural landscape of the Middle Ages.

The symposium will be based in the beautiful grounds of the University of Bristol's Wills Hall, and will include a workshop at historic Downside Abbey, with its medieval manuscripts, incunables, and Centre for Monastic Heritage. We will also visit Wells Cathedral, as well as the medieval sites of Bristol.

Celebrate 2018 — the first-ever European Year of Cultural Heritage —by delivering a paper or presenting a poster dealing with an aspect of one of the bedrocks of European culture: monasticism.

Registration will commence in September 2017, but we are accepting abstracts for papers and posters (150 words) now. Please send your abstracts before 30 September 2017 (and any queries) to: imsss-2018@bristol.ac.uk

For full details, see imsss.net/symposium-2018


Conferences, Lectures & Calls for Papers (Outside UK)



Byzantine Studies Conference

43rd Annual Byzantine Studies Conference of the Byzantine Studies Association of North America

5-8 October 2017, University Of Minnesota, Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN

For full details, including programme, see https://sites.google.com/a/umn.edu/bsc2017/

Conference registration is now open.


Armenia & Byzantium without Borders

Graduate and Early Career Workshop/Call for papers (closes 31 October 2017)

20-22 April 2018, University of Vienna, Austria

Within the framework of ‘Moving Byzantium: Mobility, Microstructure and Personal Agency,’ a five-year project begun at the University of Vienna in 2016 and funded through the Wittgenstein-Prize (rapp.univie.ac.at), ‘Armenia & Byzantium without Borders’ is a three-day workshop focussing on social and cultural mobility between Armenia and Byzantium in the Middle Ages. This workshop continues a scholarly conversation initiated in March 2017 at the University of Uppsala where a study-day dedicated to ‘Narrative Exchanges between Byzantium and Armenia’ was organized by AnnaLinden Weller within the Uppsala/Paris ‘Text and Narrative in Byzantium’ project.

We invite advanced PhD candidates and early career scholars working in the fields of Late Antique, Armenian, Byzantine, and Middle Eastern Studies to submit proposals for 20 min. papers connected with the main topics of ‘Moving Byzantium’, with a focus on aspects of social and cultural mobility of persons, objects, and/or ideas between Armenia and Byzantium throughout the Middle Ages. We are particularly interested in new research showing interaction and communication on both literary and material grounds between the Byzantine world and the Armenians. Each paper presented at the workshop will be accompanied by a senior scholar’s 10 min. response, followed by a general discussion. The workshop will be inaugurated with the lecture of our keynote speaker, Prof. Bernard Coulie (Catholic University of Louvain), and will include a visit to the Mekhitarist Monastery of Vienna and a guided tour of the exhibition on ‘Byzantium and the West’ at the Schallaburg Castle.

Travel and accommodation expenses of scholars selected for presentation at the workshop will be covered by a generous grant of the ‘Moving Byzantium’ project. Paper proposals should be sent by the 31st of October 2017 to Emilio Bonfiglio: emilio.bonfiglio@univie.ac.at. Applications will include:a) university affiliation; b) graduate level; c) title of the paper; d) abstract (max 250 words); e) CV.

Convenors: Dr. Emilio Bonfiglio and Prof. Claudia Rapp


What’s So Funny? Discovering and Interpreting Humor in the Ancient World

Conference/Call for papers (closes 30 November 2017)

20-21 April 2018 The Ohio State University Columbus, Ohio

Humor is a ubiquitous human phenomenon with a wide range of applications. Yet, what is deemed humorous is often culturally determined. This poses a significant challenge for scholars of ancient cultures. How do we identify what an ancient culture found funny? How did they use humor, and what drove their usage? The purpose of this conference is to provide a forum for scholars across disciplines to discuss and debate humor and its functions in both textual and material sources across the ancient Mediterranean, from the early Near East through late antiquity. We invite papers that address the above questions, or any others, on the topic of humor in an ancient Mediterranean context.

Possible topics include: Theoretical models for identifying and understanding humor and comedy in ancient cultures • Ancient definitions and theories of humor • Humor in political discourse, including propaganda, competition, and resistance • The role of humor in religion and ritual • Humor and social taboo: obscenities, scatology, and transgressive behaviors • Women, sexuality, and gender as sites of humor • Humor and social boundaries: elite and popular, native and foreign, center and periphery, divine and mortal, and other lines of membership • Humor’s function in narrative and in the relationship between storyteller and audience • Humor as entertainment in daily life, including inscriptions, performance, and celebration Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be submitted by email to humor.ohiostate@gmail.com by 30 November 2017. Please include “Humor Conference Abstract” and your name in the subject line.


Second Annual Conference on Byzantine and Medieval Studies

Conference/Call for Papers (closes 20 September 2017)

12-14 January 2018, Nicosia, Cyprus

Scholars, researchers and students are encouraged to present their ongoing research, work-in-progress or fieldwork  report on any aspect of the history,  archaeology, art, architecture, literature, philosophy and religion of Cyprus and  the  Eastern Mediterranean during the Byzantine, Medieval and Ottoman periods.

For details, download the full Call for Papers (NB deadline has been extended to 20 September) or see byzantinistsociety.org.cy/cbms2018/


Byzantine Neighborhoods: Urban Space and Political Action

17 November 2017, Dumbarton Oaks, Washington DC, USA

The role of neighborhoods in late antique and Byzantine cities remains little studied. This colloquium aims at a multidisciplinary investigation of neighborhoods as spatial, social, and political entities that mediate between communities and the state, and thus contribute to the establishment and maintenance of political sovereignty.

Drawing on archaeology, architecture, administrative history, and literature, speakers will investigate how Byzantines defined, organized, and conceptualized their neighborhoods, and how forms of collectivity that were shaped in neighborhoods translated to political action. The resulting conversations should contribute to a new understanding of Byzantine political and social life at the local level.

Registration will open in September 2017.

For more information and the full program, please follow the link below:

www.doaks.org/research/byzantine/scholarly-activities/the-byzantine-neighborhood-urban-space-and-political-action-1/the-byzantine-neighborhood-urban-space-and-political-action


Graduate and Early Career Workshop: 'Armenia & Byzantium without Borders'

Workshop/Call for papers (closes 31 December 2017)

20-22 April 2018, Vienna, Austria

We invite advanced PhD candidates and early career scholars working in the fields of Late Antique, Armenian, Byzantine, and Middle Eastern Studies to submit proposals for 20 min. papers for a three-day workshop on ‘Armenia & Byzantium without Borders’ that will take place in Vienna (20–22 April 2018).

Proposals should focus on aspects of social and cultural mobility of persons, objects, and/or ideas between Armenia and Byzantium throughout the Middle Ages. We are particularly interested in new research showing
interaction and communication on both literary and material grounds between the Byzantine world and the Armenians. Travel and accommodation expenses of scholars selected for presentation at the workshop will be covered by a generous grant of the ‘Moving Byzantium’ project.

Further information can be found in the attached document and at: rapp.univie.ac.at
Paper proposals should be sent by the 31st of October 2017 to Dr. Emilio Bonfiglio: emilio.bonfiglio@univie.ac.at. Applications will include: a) university affiliation; b) graduate level; c) title of the paper; d) abstract (max 250 words); e) CV.


Othello's Island 2018: 6th annual interdisciplinary conference on byzantine, medieval, renaissance and early modern art, literary, archaeological, historical and cultural studies

25 to 27 March 2018, CVAR, Nicosia, Cyprus

Keynote Lecture 2018: "Donor Portraits in Byzantine Art", to be presented by Professor Henri Frances (American University of Beirut)

The Academic Board for Othello's Island invites applications to present papers at the 6th edition of Othello's Island. This will take place in Nicosia, Cyprus, in March 2018. We are interested in hearing papers on diverse aspects of Byzantine, Medieval, Renaissance and early modern art, literature, history, society and other aspects of culture.

Our remit is broad, and so it is worth looking at the range of papers from past conferences to see that previous speakers have covered topics ranging from slavery in medieval Cyprus and Malta, to the impact of Italian Renaissance art on Cypriot Byzantine painting, and even discussion on the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf. And Shakespeare, and his contemporaries, are important too, of course.

In the six years of its existence, Othello's Island has developed a reputation as one of the most liberal-minded and friendly medieval and renaissance studies conferences in the world today, and it is also genuinely interdisciplinary. In part this is due to the relatively small size of the event, which generates a true sense of community during the conference.

Our location in Cyprus allows for visits to some stunning medieval museums and other sites, including the French gothic cathedrals of St Sophia in Nicosia, and St Nicholas in Famagusta, and we are housed in the centre of the medieval old town of Nicosia, with its narrow winding streets and impressive city walls and gate houses.

Deadline for submissions is 22 December 2017.

For the full call for papers please visit www.othellosisland.org


Neighbours or Strangers? Conflict, Negotiation, and Collaboration in Multicultural Communities Passages from Antiquity to the Middle Ages VII

Conference/Call for Papers (closes 31 October 2017)

23-25 August 2018, University of Tampere, Finland

Questions of toleration, aggression and even hatred based on ethnic diversity have been accentuated in recent times, but multiculturalism in its various forms is far from being confined to the modern world only. The seventh international Passages from Antiquity to the Middle Ages conference will focus on forms of interaction and methods of negotiation in multicultural, multiethnic, and multilingual contexts.

The conference aims at concentrating on social and cultural interaction within and between multi-ethnic and multilingual communities, groups and individuals, minority (minorities) and majority. Cooperation, toleration, and coexistence was an everyday necessity in Ancient and medieval societies. On occasion, however, these would turn into the opposite: suspicion, conflict, and violence, enhanced by power struggles and prejudices. All these had a central influence on social dynamics, negotiations of collective or individual identity, definitions of ethnicity, and shaping of legal rules. What was the function of multicultural and multilingual interaction in various contexts: did it create and increase conflicts, or was it rather a prerequisite for survival and prosperity?

Our focus lies on society and the history of everyday life. We welcome papers, which have a sensitive approach to social differences: gender, status, and ethnicity. Actors, experiences, and various levels of negotiations are of main interest. We aim at a broad coverage not only chronologically but also geographically and disciplinarily (all branches of Classical, Byzantine and Medieval Studies). Most preferable are contributions that have themselves a comparative and/or interdisciplinary viewpoint or focusing on a longue durée perspective.

For full details, see the website:www.uta.fi/trivium/passages/


ReLACS

Workshop/Call for Papers (closes 1 August 2017)

19-20 October, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA

ReLACS, now in its fifth year, is a annual workshop of scholars of Late Antiquity held on a rotating basis at Vanderbilt University, the University of Tennessee, and the University of Kentucky.

The 2017 meeting will be hosted by the Program in Classical and Mediterranean Studies and the Divinity School at Vanderbilt University in Nashville. Participation is open to all scholars interested in Late Antiquity broadly defined. Participation by graduate students is particularly encouraged.

The workshop kicks off with a public lecture on the evening of Thursday, October 19th given by Stephen J. Davis, Professor of Religious Studies and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at Yale University, on “The Archaeology of Early Christian Monasticism: Evidentiary Problems and Criteria.” This lecture presents a reassessment of what we know (and how we know what we know) about the archaeological evidence for Christian monasticism in the first millennium CE. Assessing the current state of the field, Prof. Davis will first address problems we face in both the identification and the dating of “monastic” sites and then discuss criteria by which we can engage more critically with the material evidence available to us.

On Friday, October 20th, the workshop will host several sessions. Phillip I. Lieberman, Associate Professor of Jewish Studies and Law at Vanderbilt University, will lead a pro-seminar on “Introduction to the Cairo Geniza” designed to introduce non-specialists to resources for using the Geniza in teaching and research. The Cairo Geniza comprises the largest collection of documentary materials from the premodern Islamic world and is a critical resource for the social, economic, legal, and political history of the reception of antiquity into the medieval Mediterranean.

In addition we invite proposals from regional participants for work-in-progress papers on any topic broadly related to Late Antiquity or the early middle ages in any geographic region. Papers will be given 30-minute sessions and may be read aloud or pre-circulated to allow more time for discussion.

Please send a short description of the paper (approximately 200 words) including mention of its context (conference paper, part of a book manuscript, etc.) to David Michelson (david.a.michelson@vanderbilt.edu). Paper proposals will be considered by a steering committee (faculty from UT, VU, and UK) and selections will be made on the basis of maximizing regional participation from a diverse group of presenters. Proposals are due by August 1, 2017.

If you would like to attend or to receive further information about ReLACS workshops please subscribe to our e-mail list: send an email to listserv@list.vanderbilt.edu with the command “SUBSCRIBE LATE-ANTIQUITY-SOUTHEAST” in the body of your message. This list is a public listserv intended as a regional e-mail list to connect ReLACS scholars (including students) throughout the southeastern United States. Messages publicize regional meetings or other regional collaborations of interest to the list. (This regionally-oriented list does not reduplicate the nationally-oriented list maintained by the University of South Carolina).


Georgia - Byzantium - Christian East

International Conference/Call for papers (closes 30 June 2017)

25-27 September 2017, Tbilisi, Georgia

Georgian identity among modern European world is defined by the proper definition of its cultural and historic experience in the history of world civilization. The aim of the conference is to prove that the Georgian culture is an essential part of world heritage. Georgian culture of the Middle Ages is an effective participator of the modern World cultural dialogue, as it is the part of common Christian world.

For details, download the full Call for Papers


Days Of Justinian I: “Byzantium and the Slavs: Medieval and Modern Perceptions and Receptions”

International symposium/Call for Papers

17-18 November, 2017, Skopje, Republic of Macedonia

The International scientific symposium “Days of Justinian I” is an annual interdisciplinary scholarly forum aimed at the presentation of the latest research followed by discussions on various aspects of Byzantine and Medieval Studies, that include the treatment and interpretation of cultural, historical and spiritual heritage in contemporary Europe. The Symposium is dedicated to Emperor Justinian I with the aim to address a broad range of issues related to Byzantium and the European Middle Ages, comprising the exploration of the cultural and historical legacy as an integrative component of the diversities and commonalities of Unified Europe.
This year the International Symposium “Days of Justinian I” chose a special thematic strand “Byzantium and the Slavs: Medieval and Modern Perceptions and Receptions”, with the aim of discussing various aspects of the Slavic world and its legacy, from the Medieval and Modern perspective. The Symposium will address many issues concerning the Origins, Ethnicity, Identity, the State Formation of the Slavs and the relationships with Byzantium and Western Europe. The reception of the Slavic legacy in post-medieval Europe will also be explored and compared with the divergent visions of the Byzantine heritage, with the aim of defining their place within the frame of the European civilizational concept.

For full details, download the full call for papers.


The Impact of Learning Greek, Hebrew and ‘Oriental’ Languages On Scholarship, Science, and Society in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance

International conference/Call for Papers (closes 30 April 2017)

13-15 December 2017, Leuven, Belgium

In 1517, Leuven witnessed the foundation of the Collegium Trilingue. This institute, funded through the legacy of Hieronymus Busleyden and enthusiastically promoted by Desiderius Erasmus, offered courses in the three ‘sacred’ languages Hebrew, Greek, and Latin. LECTIO (Leuven Centre for the Study of the Transmission of Texts and Ideas in Antiquity, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance) seizes the 500th anniversary of the foundation of the Leuven Collegium Trilingue as an incentive both to examine the general context in which such polyglot institutes emerged and—more generally—to assess the  overall impact of Greek and Hebrew education, by organizing a three-day international conference. Our focus is not exclusively on the 16th century, as we also welcome papers dealing with the status and functions accorded to Greek, Hebrew, and other ‘Oriental’ languages in the (later) Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period up to 1750. Special attention will be directed to the learning and teaching practices and to the general impact the study of these languages exerted on scholarship, science and society.

For further details and full call for papers, see the website.


Narrating Power and Authority in Late Antique and Medieval Hagiographies from East to West

International Conference and Call for Papers (closes 15 July 2017)

15-17 February 2018, Academia Belgica, Rome, Italy

In hagiographies, saints often confront a number of obstacles and it is their conduct in faith that marks them as saints; women and men who stand apart and are presented as exemplars to be modeled. Often, and this is especially the case of martyr acts, the obstacles are of a religiopolitical nature and the focus of the saint’s conduct is her/his defiance. However, there are instances, especially within the medieval Sufi context, where the relationships between saints and rulers are more nuanced, depicting a symbiotic relationship, where both parties draw upon the authority of the other. There are also those cases in which authority belongs neither to the saint or the king but to ordinary people from across the socio-political and religious spectrum. In recent years, there has been interest in exploring these relationships as depicted in histories, hagiographies, and martyr acts and recent studies have shed light on the concept of sainthood, doctrine, and more generally, the history of various societies. However, the literary aspects of these narratives remain underexplored despite the wealth of information such analyses offer on the socio-cultural and political thought world of various courts and societies across the Indo-Mediterranean world.

This conference takes a diachronic and cross-cultural approach to the study of power and authority from above (courts/saints) and below (saints/ordinary people). We invite papers from scholars who work on different types of late antique and medieval hagiographical narratives (Lives, Martyr Acts, hagiographical romances) working on Persian, Arabic, Syriac, Georgian, Coptic, Armenian, Greek, and Latin hagiographical texts. Of particular interest are papers that will explore:

  • how texts construct and understand the roles of saints and rulers vis-à-vis one another (positive, negative, symbiotic/exploitative)
  • how authority is negotiated between saints and the populace
  • ?the power of the life of the saint after death (relics, the authority of hagiographers)
  • the role of characterization in the portrayal of figures of power and authority (stock characters, intermediaries, secondary figures)
  • audience milieu and reader reception
  • literary history

Please send your abstracts to: Ghazzal Dabiri (ghazzal.dabiri(at)ugent.be ) by 15 July 2017. Abstracts (350 words max, in English) should include name, title of proposed paper, affiliation, and position. Notification about participation will be emailed by 30 September 2017.


From Oriens Christianus to the Muslim Near East

Workshop/Call for papers (Closes 1 May 2017)

4 December 2017, Freie Universität Berlin (FU Berlin), Germany

The workshop seeks to shed new light on the crossroads at which the Late Antique world of the Eastern Mediterranean heralded diverse exchanges between Oriental Christendom, Byzantine culture and the Islamic world. Furthermore, how these exchanges impacted the development of diverse regions, cultures, languages, and religions.

The workshop will provide an inter-disciplinary overview of the various perspectives emerging from the Christian Oriental, Byzantine, Early Islamic and Archaeological approaches to this area of research. The key objective of the workshop is to explore the possibilities of a unified and holistic approach to understanding the "Sattelzeit" (R. Koselleck) – i.e. the period between 500 and 750 CE. While the scope of the workshop has been intentionally left broad, papers are particularly welcome in, but not limited to, the following areas:

  • The role of Eastern/Oriental Christians in the relationship(s) formed between the Islamic Caliphate and the Byzantine Empire.
  • Scripture and Arts as a medium of interchange between Christians and Muslims.
  • The historical narratives and administrative reality of the expansion of the Islamic Empire.

We hope that the workshop will encourage fruitful discussions about the state-of-the-art of the field and highlight potential areas for future inquiry. Furthermore, that the workshop will provide a platform for both established researchers in the field and early-career academics (e.g. advanced Ph.D. students and Postdocs). Each paper will be allocated 20 minutes with a further 15 minutes for discussion. The workshop proceedings will be published in an edited volume under Gorgias Press’ Islamic History and Thought series and each participant will be provided with a complimentary hardback copy of the edited volume.

To submit a paper, please provide an abstract (max. 500 words) and a professional biography (max. 250 words) by 1st May, 2017 to manolis.ulbricht(at)fu-berlin.de . Full papers should be submitted by 30th September, 2017. Limited funding will be available for accommodation and/or travel. As there are limited spaces for non-participants, kindly inform the conveners if you would like to attend the workshop and places will be allocated on an RSVP basis.

Conveners: Manolis Ulbricht, Byzantine Studies, Freie Universität Berlin and Adam Walker, HLCS, Radboud University / Gorgias Press


The Christian Orient & Byzantium

Conference/Call for Papers (closes 1 June 2017)

28-29 September & 2-4 October 2017, St Petersburg, Russia

The State Hermitage museum is happy to announce Call for Papers for two conferences: Christian Orient: Cultural Interactions with other Traditions (28-29 September 2017) and Byzantium within the Context of World Culture dedicated to the memory of Alisa V. Bank (2-4,October 2017).

The Christian Orient conference topics include the wide range of problems concerning Eastern Christian contacts with other religious groups and traditions, focusing basically on discussing written sources.

Byzantium within the context of the world culture conference emphasizes mostly studies in different aspects of Byzantine cultural heritage.

You can choose either of these conferences or participate in both of them.

The deadline for submitting proposals to the conferences is June, 1, 2017. Please send the title of your paper to orient.chretien@gmail.com. The conference languages are Russian and English.

On September, 30 – October, 1, 2017 (Saturday, Sunday) there will be a special cultural programme for the speakers.


The Forty-Third Annual Byzantine Studies Conference

Call for Papers (closes 1 March 2017)

5-8 October 2017, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA 

The BSC is the annual forum for the presentation and discussion of papers on every aspect of Byzantine
studies, and is open to all, regardless of nationality or academic status. It is also the occasion of the annual
meeting of the Byzantine Studies Association of North America (BSANA), conducted by its officers.

For more information, please consult the BSANA website, http://www.bsana.net, which will be updated in the
coming months as new information becomes available.

We welcome proposals on any aspect of Byzantine studies. For full details, download the Call for Papers.


“Auctor est aequivocum”: Authenticity, Authority and Authorship from the Classical Antiquity to the Middle Ages

International conference/Call for papers (closes 30 April 2017)

26-27 October 2017, University of Bari, Italy

Prolepsis Association is delighted to announce its second international postgraduate conference whose theme will be the investigation into the concepts of authenticity and authorship of literary and historical texts from the Classical Antiquity to the Medieval and the Byzantine Age

For full Call for Papers, see the website.


10th International Conference for Doctoral Students of Byzantium

Call for papers (closes 10 March 2017)

6-7 October 2017, Paris, France

For details, download the call for papers.


Editing Late-Antique and Early Medieval Texts. Problems and Challenges

International Workshop/Call for papers (closes 30 May 2016)
23-24 November 2017, University of Lisbon, Portugal

This workshop aims at fostering and promoting the exchange of ideas on how to edit Late-Antique and Early-Medieval texts. By presenting case-studies, participants will be encouraged to share the editorial problems and methodological challenges that they had to face in order to fulfil their research or critical editions.

For full details, see the website.


Preserving, Commenting, Adapting: Commentaries on Ancient Texts in Twelfth-Century Byzantium

International workshop/Call for Papers (closes 30 April 2017)

20-21 October 2017, University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland

In this workshop, we propose to explore the use of ancient texts in twelfth-century Byzantium through commentaries. Classical scholarship flourished in twelfth-century Constantinople; scholars such as Eustathios of Thessalonike and John Tzetzes undertook ambitious projects of Homeric exegesis, while Eustratios of Nicaea produced commentaries on various of Aristotle’s works. In a broader sense, treatises like those by John Tzetzes on ancient tragedy and comedy or literary works such as Theodore Prodromos’ Katomyomachia and Bion Prasis can also be said to comment on ancient texts and, thus, reveal the manifold ways in which Byzantines dealt with their ancient heritage.

For details, download the full Call for Papers.


Literature Squared: Metaliterary Reflections in Late Antiquity

International conference/Call for Papers (closes 15 May 2017)

6-7 October 2017, University of Salamanca, Spain 

The fifth annual conference of the International Society for Late Antique Literary Studies (ISLALS) will convene at the University of Salamanca (Spain) on October 6–7, 2017, following the successful meetings in the USA (Brown 2013, Boston 2014, Bryn Mawr and Haverford 2016) and the UK (Oxford 2015).

Under the motto “Literature squared”, this year’s conference will cover a wide range of topics directly related to the general idea of literature speaking of, commenting on, or contrasting with, literature itself: from metaliterary prooemia and self-referential pieces/passages, to Christian and pagan exegesis (commentaries, metatexts, paratexts, allegorical re-readings, rhetorical treatises, hermeneutics, etc), via all kind of self-aware “derivative” genres (such as centos, epitomes, translations, paraphrases, etc). Intertextual dialogues will be also taken into consideration, provided that they focus on strictly (meta-)literary issues. Finally, special attention will be paid to the study of the late antique philosophical inquiries on the ideas of fictionality, language, representation and literature.

Communications will be 20 minutes long, with 10 additional minutes for questions and discussion. English and Spanish will be the accepted languages. Depending on the quality and coherence of the presentations the publication of a collected volume will be envisaged. Both senior scholars and early career researchers (including PhD students) are welcome (and encouraged) to submit paper proposals. If you would like to participate, please send an abstract of your paper (200-300 words) via email attachment by 

May 15, 2017 to the organizers: Jesús Hernández Lobato (jhlobato@usal.es) and Óscar Prieto Domínguez (praxo@usal.es). Please include your academic affiliation.

ISLALS requires no dues and there is no registration fee for the conference. A closing banquet for conference speakers will round out this year’s gathering, commemorating the eighth centenary of the foundation of the University of Salamanca, the third oldest in continuous operation in Europe. Expenses for lodging and travel to and from the conference will be the responsibility of participants. The organizers can help participants secure lodging at nearby hotels. Additional information about the conference can be found at: salamancaislals.wordpress.com

Please send queries about conference particulars to the organizers: Jesús Hernández Lobato (jhlobato@usal.es) and Óscar Prieto Domínguez (praxo@usal.es) .General queries about ISLALS may be sent to any member of the steering committee: Scott McGill (smcgill@rice.edu), Joseph Pucci (Joseph_Pucci@brown.edu) and David Bright (dbright@emory.edu).


The 8th Century: Patterns of Transition in Economy and Trade Throughout the Late
Antique, Early Medieval and Islamicate Mediterranean

International conference/Call for papers (closes 15 January 2017)

4-7 October 2017, Berlin, Germany

The “8th century" has been historically and archaeologically considered a sort of watershed between Antiquity and the Middle Ages. The definition of the transformations in this period is a crucial issue, especially concerning continuity and
change of the economic structures in the Late Antique Mediterranean world. The aim of this international interdisciplinary conference is to bring together scholars from several disciplines, including Late Antique, Islamic, Byzantine and Medieval History, Archaeology, Archaeometry, Numismatics, Philology and Papyrology, dealing with the 8th century’s threshold from different perspectives, in order to re-evaluate the problematic of this transition in terms of continuity/disruption by combining archaeological data and written—literary as well as documentary—sources.

We are planning to have thematic sessions with key notes (35 plus 10 minutes) and papers (20 plus 10 minutes), a poster session, and a concluding round table. We would ask those of you who indicate their wish to participate with a paper/poster to provide us with an abstract and a working title by 15 January 2017. We are attempting to arrange for the funding of all travel and accommodation expenses.

For further details, download the full call for papers.


The Journal of Modern Hellenism

Call for submissions

The Journal of Modern Hellenism is seeking submissions from emerging and established scholars on the history, language, and culture of Greece and the Greek Diaspora, from Middle Byzantium to the Modern Era.

Since 1984, the JMH has served as a forum for the promotion of scholarly work on the history, language, institutions, and culture of the Greek people from the Byzantine period to the present. In 2014, the journal moved online and is now hosted on an open access publication platform developed by the Public Knowledge Project. In 2016 the JMH renewed its editorial board and moved to a rolling publication model, which allows for a much shorter publication cycle than other academic journals. Articles are published online as soon as they complete the peer-review process.

The JMH is a joint publication of the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Centre for Hellenic Studies, the Center for Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies of Queens College, City University of New York, and the Hellenic Studies Program at California State University, Sacramento.

For more information about the JMH and its submission guidelines or to view current and past issues of the journal, please visit us: http://www.sfu.ca/snfchs/JMH.html


Nea Paphos and Western Cyprus: New Archaeological and Historical Perspectives

International Colloquium/Call for Papers (closes 31 October 2016)

11-15 October 2017, Pafos, Cyprus

The main aim of this second scientific meeting, besides the presentation of new discoveries made by the archaeological missions currently working on the site, is to study the evolution of the city, as well as of that of other sites in Western Cyprus, from the Hellenistic period to Early Medieval times. The languages of the colloquium will be Greek and English.

For further details, download the Call for Papers.