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Seminar Series at UK Universities


Conferences, Lectures & Calls for Papers (UK)



Imitation and Innovation: Uses of the Past in the Medieval and Early Modern World

Conference and Call for Papers (closes 14 April 2017)

11-12 July 2017, Durham University

The use of the past is a theme which transcends disciplinary boundaries, and has contemporary as well as historical resonance. This is manifested in a physical sense through the moulding of and engagement with landscapes, the manufacture and (re)use of material culture, and in a more abstract sense through the creation and manipulation of memory and identity which form the core of social ideas and mentalities about the world.

This year’s MEMSA Conference will focus on how people in the Medieval and Early Modern World engaged with, understood, and interpreted the past, in order to explore the ways in which they perceived and sought to shape their own world. In doing so, we will also be able to gain a greater awareness of how past worlds still contribute to shaping our own present perceptions.

We welcome abstract submissions from postgraduates and early career researchers from any discipline engaged in the study of the Medieval and Early Modern periods, including History, Literature, Archaeology, Theology, Art, Music, Languages, and Culture.

For further details, download the full CfP.


The medieval Mediterranean: cultural, religious and economic exchanges

Conference/Call for Papers (closes 18 March 2017)

20 May 2017, University of Leeds

We welcome papers from a variety of disciplines and methodological approaches (historical, literary, and linguistic) to the problem of the Mediterranean as a place of exchange at all levels.

Postgraduate students and early career researchers are welcome to present papers.

The deadline for applying is 18th March, and applicants need to send an email with a 200-word abstract and a short academic biography at the following address:  mediterranean.poscon(at)gmail.com

For further details, see the website.


Multiculturalism from Late Antiquity to Modernity

Postgraduate Colloquium/Call for Papers (closes 3 April 2017)

3 June 2017, University of Birmingham

Papers are invited for the 18th Annual Postgraduate Colloquium at the Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies. Multiculturalism is a concept which is present in modern everyday life but also extremely relevant to the past. Empires by their very nature are multicultural constructs and while a great deal of scholarship looks at how minorities were treated or survived throughout history this colloquium is interested in the places in which cultures interact. This colloquium will focus on cultural, social and religious interactions in all spheres of life from armed conflict to diplomacy and cultural assimilation.

Papers of approximately 20 minutes related to any of the fields covered by Byzantine, Ottoman and Modern Greek Studies are welcome. Please submit abstracts of no more than 250 words no later than Monday 3rd April 2017 to cbomgs2017@gmail.com. Applicants will be notified of selection within a week of this date.

Please note that a limited amount of discretionary funding may be available to assist overseas speakers to cover partial cost. This will be assigned on a first come first served basis. Please make your interest known upon submission of your abstract.

For further details, download the full CfP.


The Mediaeval Journal Essay Prize

The Mediaeval Journal, in partnership with the St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, are pleased to announce the call for their 2017 essay competition. The prize is open to graduate students and postdocs within 3 years of their viva. The value of the prize is £500 and the winning entry will be considered for publication in TMJ. This year’s deadline is 24 March 2017.

For full details, see the website.


Memory sanctions and ‘damnatio memoriae’, c. 200AD - c. 800AD

Conference/Call for Papers (closes 17 March)

5-6 September, Trinity College, University of Cambridge

This two-day conference, taking place in Trinity College, Cambridge, will explore the changing concept of memory sanctions in late antiquity and the early middle ages (c. 200 AD – 800 AD). The process of memory sanction in the Roman world has been widely studied as damnatio memoriae (literally ‘damnation of memory’), almost exclusively understood as a process of destroying and defacing images and of removing names from honorific inscriptions. By contrast, in the early middle ages the issue of memory sanctions and the destruction of images has been mainly studied through the history of Byzantine Iconoclasm, but there is no systematic study of memory sanctions in the post-Roman world, either in the east and in the west. This conference therefore aims to bring together an interdisciplinary group of scholars with different regional, chronological, and cultural focusses to bridge the gap between Roman and medieval practices of memory sanction. This will be achieved by charting out instances of conscious and intentional attempts, however conceived, to suppress memory between c. 200 AD – 800 AD. 

The organisers therefore invite papers dealing with any aspect of the intentional suppression of memory, whether for political, religious, or social ends, from any period within the stated chronology. We seek papers from established scholars, early-career researchers and graduate students in disciplines such as Classics, History, Archaeology, and Art History. In order to maintain the comparative and interdisciplinary focus of the conference, we would also welcome submissions of a truly comparative nature within our period of study. Likewise, we would encourage papers that make a methodological contribution to our understanding of memory and its suppression. For details on the conference and full Call for Papers, please visit www.memorysanctions.com


The Art of the Network: Visualising Social Relationships, 1400-1600

Postgraduate Symposium (call for papers closes 31 December 2017)

28 April 2017, Courtauld Institute of Art, London

In recent years, the analysis of social networks has generated a fruitful field of scholarly enquiry. Research addressing the dynamics that govern personal relationships within and without communities of various kinds has permeated through historical, anthropological, and sociological studies. These investigations have traced the ways in which societies structured according to gender, family bonds, and neighbourhood ties as well as political, professional, and religious associations regulated social interaction. However, the role of art and architecture in cultivating these interpersonal relationships has not been explored comprehensively. Even art historical approaches have frequently given preference to textual rather than visual evidence in elucidating these social networks.

This conference seeks to shed light on the ways in which social networks have been represented visually. Such an approach has great potential to deepen the discussion surrounding the commission, production, and reception of art and architecture between 1400 and 1600. We invite studies that bring into dialogue social connections on the one hand and visual manifestations on the other. Preference will be given to papers that present unpublished material while engaging with methodological frameworks and/or historiographical perspectives.

Topics might include but are not limited to:

- how artistic networks affect the construction of identities
- the mobility of art and artists within networks
- whether formal, iconographic and/or stylistic features denote adherence to a community
- the identification of specific individuals in works of art
- how issues of display influence social bonds
- the employment of personal, familial, political, ecclesiastical or professional devices

Proposals of no more than 350 words should be submitted together with a short CV to Alexander Röstel (alexander.rostel(at)courtauld.ac.uk ) and Alexander Noelle (alexander.noelle(at)courtauld.ac.uk ) by 31 December 2016. Successful candidates will be notified in mid-January. Papers should not exceed 20 minutes in length. Costs for travel and accommodation cannot be covered but partial funding might become available and catering will be provided for all speakers.


27th Annual Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference (TRAC)

Call for Papers: 'Session 2: A Globalised Visual Culture? Towards a Geography of Late Antique Art' (closes 18 November 2016)

28-31 March 2017, University of Durham

Organisers: Fabio Guidetti (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Exzellenzcluster Topoi), Katharina Meinecke (Universität Wien, Institut für Klassische Archäologie)

Late Antique artefacts, and the images they carry, attest to a highly connected visual culture from ca. 300 to 800 C.E. On the one hand, the same decorative motifs and iconographies are found across various genres of visual and material culture, irrespective of social and economic differences among their users – for instance in mosaics, architectural decoration, and luxury arts (silver plate, textiles, ivories), as well as in objects of everyday use such as tableware, lamps, and pilgrim vessels. On the other hand, they are also spread in geographically distant regions. Decorative motifs of Roman (and later Byzantine) origin appear, mingled with local elements, far beyond the traditional borders of the classical world – in the Germanic West, Himyarite South Arabia, Sasanian Iran, and the Umayyad Empire. At the same time, foreign motifs, especially of Germanic and Sasanian origin, are attested in Roman territories. This combination of iconographies pertaining to different traditions in various cultural contexts created a veritable koiné of images, which was characteristic of the Late Roman and post-Roman world.

This panel wishes to investigate the reasons behind this appropriation of images in different cultural contexts across the Late Antique world. In a period characterised by increasing political fragmentation, acculturation to a dominating Roman/Byzantine Empire and enhanced connectivity cannot be the only explanations for this visual koiné. Why were these images attractive to patrons of so different geographical and cultural origins, and how were they transferred from one area into another? The aim of the panel is to seek new approaches to these questions and to develop a theoretical framework for further analysis. The contributors are encouraged to critically reflect on the adequacy of the proposed models, such as connectivity or transfer studies, in addressing the phenomenon of Late Antique visual koiné. Suggested topics include – but are not limited to – new theoretical approaches to the problem of a globalised Late Antique visual and material culture; possible modes of transfer – both within the Roman/Byzantine Empire and in cross-cultural perspective – that facilitated the geographical dissemination of iconographic motifs; case studies of certain groups of artefacts or iconographies attested in different regions and their archaeological contexts; case studies of certain geographical areas in regard to the overall topic of the highly connected visual culture of Late Antiquity.

Paper submissions should include the speaker’s name, title, institution, and an abstract of no more than 300 words. Please indicate the session you wish to contribute to. If the session is oversubscribed, submitted papers will also be considered for the general session.

More details regarding TRAC Durham: www.trac.org.uk


Melkite Christianity/Eastern Mediterranean Byzantine Christianity

International conference/ Call for Papers (closes November 2016)

12-14 July 2017, Oriental Institute, University of Oxford

ARAM Society for Syro-Mesopotamian Studies is organizing its Forty Sixth International Conference on "Melkite Christianity', or "Eastern Mediterranean Byzantine Christianity", 1st – 19th Centuries. The conference will start on Wednesday 12th July at 9am, finishing on Friday 14th July at 6:30pm. Each speaker’s paper is limited to 35 minutes, with an additional 10 minutes for discussion. All papers given at the conference will be considered for publication in a future edition of the ARAM Periodical, subject to editorial review. If you wish to participate in the conference, please contact our ARAM Society: ARAM, the Oriental Institute, Oxford University, Pusey Lane, Oxford OX1 2LE, England. aram(at)orinst.ox.ac.uk. For further details, download the registration form.


Conferences, Lectures & Calls for Papers (Outside UK)



Narrating Power and Authority in Late Antique and Medieval Hagiographies from East to West

International Conference and Call for Papers (closes 15 July 2017)

15-17 February 2018, Academia Belgica, Rome, Italy

In hagiographies, saints often confront a number of obstacles and it is their conduct in faith that marks them as saints; women and men who stand apart and are presented as exemplars to be modeled. Often, and this is especially the case of martyr acts, the obstacles are of a religiopolitical nature and the focus of the saint’s conduct is her/his defiance. However, there are instances, especially within the medieval Sufi context, where the relationships between saints and rulers are more nuanced, depicting a symbiotic relationship, where both parties draw upon the authority of the other. There are also those cases in which authority belongs neither to the saint or the king but to ordinary people from across the socio-political and religious spectrum. In recent years, there has been interest in exploring these relationships as depicted in histories, hagiographies, and martyr acts and recent studies have shed light on the concept of sainthood, doctrine, and more generally, the history of various societies. However, the literary aspects of these narratives remain underexplored despite the wealth of information such analyses offer on the socio-cultural and political thought world of various courts and societies across the Indo-Mediterranean world.

This conference takes a diachronic and cross-cultural approach to the study of power and authority from above (courts/saints) and below (saints/ordinary people). We invite papers from scholars who work on different types of late antique and medieval hagiographical narratives (Lives, Martyr Acts, hagiographical romances) working on Persian, Arabic, Syriac, Georgian, Coptic, Armenian, Greek, and Latin hagiographical texts. Of particular interest are papers that will explore:

  • how texts construct and understand the roles of saints and rulers vis-à-vis one another (positive, negative, symbiotic/exploitative)
  • how authority is negotiated between saints and the populace
  • ?the power of the life of the saint after death (relics, the authority of hagiographers)
  • the role of characterization in the portrayal of figures of power and authority (stock characters, intermediaries, secondary figures)
  • audience milieu and reader reception
  • literary history

Please send your abstracts to: Ghazzal Dabiri (ghazzal.dabiri(at)ugent.be ) by 15 July 2017. Abstracts (350 words max, in English) should include name, title of proposed paper, affiliation, and position. Notification about participation will be emailed by 30 September 2017.


From Oriens Christianus to the Muslim Near East

Workshop/Call for papers (Closes 1 May 2017)

4 December 2017, Freie Universität Berlin (FU Berlin), Germany

The workshop seeks to shed new light on the crossroads at which the Late Antique world of the Eastern Mediterranean heralded diverse exchanges between Oriental Christendom, Byzantine culture and the Islamic world. Furthermore, how these exchanges impacted the development of diverse regions, cultures, languages, and religions.

The workshop will provide an inter-disciplinary overview of the various perspectives emerging from the Christian Oriental, Byzantine, Early Islamic and Archaeological approaches to this area of research. The key objective of the workshop is to explore the possibilities of a unified and holistic approach to understanding the "Sattelzeit" (R. Koselleck) – i.e. the period between 500 and 750 CE. While the scope of the workshop has been intentionally left broad, papers are particularly welcome in, but not limited to, the following areas:

  • The role of Eastern/Oriental Christians in the relationship(s) formed between the Islamic Caliphate and the Byzantine Empire.
  • Scripture and Arts as a medium of interchange between Christians and Muslims.
  • The historical narratives and administrative reality of the expansion of the Islamic Empire.

We hope that the workshop will encourage fruitful discussions about the state-of-the-art of the field and highlight potential areas for future inquiry. Furthermore, that the workshop will provide a platform for both established researchers in the field and early-career academics (e.g. advanced Ph.D. students and Postdocs). Each paper will be allocated 20 minutes with a further 15 minutes for discussion. The workshop proceedings will be published in an edited volume under Gorgias Press’ Islamic History and Thought series and each participant will be provided with a complimentary hardback copy of the edited volume.

To submit a paper, please provide an abstract (max. 500 words) and a professional biography (max. 250 words) by 1st May, 2017 to manolis.ulbricht(at)fu-berlin.de . Full papers should be submitted by 30th September, 2017. Limited funding will be available for accommodation and/or travel. As there are limited spaces for non-participants, kindly inform the conveners if you would like to attend the workshop and places will be allocated on an RSVP basis.

Conveners: Manolis Ulbricht, Byzantine Studies, Freie Universität Berlin and Adam Walker, HLCS, Radboud University / Gorgias Press


International Byzantine Greek Summer School (IBGSS)

17 July-11 August 2017, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland

The Department of Classics, Trinity College Dublin is delighted to welcome back the International Byzantine Greek Summer School (IBGSS) in July–August 2017. This well-established course, directed by Dr Anthony Hirst, came to Dublin in 2016 after having run successfully for fourteen years at the University of Birmingham (2012-15) and Queen’s University Belfast (2002-11). The course teaches Byzantine Greek at four levels – Level 1 Beginners, Levels 2 and 2.5 Intermediate and Level 3 Advanced Reading – and allows early learners to engage with original Byzantine texts from the start.

We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Classical Association (UK) and the Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies for student bursaries for this course.

For full details and applications, see the website.


Seasides of Byzantium: Harbours and Anchorages in the Medieval Mediterranean

International conference

29 May-1 June 2017, National Hellenic Research Foundation

For further details, see the poster.


2017 Byzantine Symposium: Rethinking Empire

21-22 April 2017, Dumbarton Oaks, Washington DC, USA

What do we mean when we call Byzantium an empire? A flurry of studies in recent years by historians of other hegemonic civilizations have situated empire and imperialism as historical phenomena across different periods and geographical areas. Until now, the involvement of Byzantinists in this reevaluation has been relatively marginal.

This symposium frames the issue of Byzantium’s imperial identity by setting it within wider contexts in the light of new research by Byzantinists as well as the approaches and methods profitably used by historians of other premodern and modern empires. The speakers will tackle fundamental problems of definition and will question Byzantium’s culture and institutions of empire, relations between core and periphery, territoriality, and ethnic diversity.

For full details, see the website.


The Christian Orient & Byzantium

Conference/Call for Papers (closes 1 June 2017)

28-29 September & 2-4 October 2017, St Petersburg, Russia

The State Hermitage museum is happy to announce Call for Papers for two conferences: Christian Orient: Cultural Interactions with other Traditions (28-29 September 2017) and Byzantium within the Context of World Culture dedicated to the memory of Alisa V. Bank (2-4,October 2017).

The Christian Orient conference topics include the wide range of problems concerning Eastern Christian contacts with other religious groups and traditions, focusing basically on discussing written sources.

Byzantium within the context of the world culture conference emphasizes mostly studies in different aspects of Byzantine cultural heritage.

You can choose either of these conferences or participate in both of them.

The deadline for submitting proposals to the conferences is June, 1, 2017. Please send the title of your paper to orient.chretien@gmail.com. The conference languages are Russian and English.

On September, 30 – October, 1, 2017 (Saturday, Sunday) there will be a special cultural programme for the speakers.


The Forty-Third Annual Byzantine Studies Conference

Call for Papers (closes 1 March 2017)

5-8 October 2017, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA 

The BSC is the annual forum for the presentation and discussion of papers on every aspect of Byzantine
studies, and is open to all, regardless of nationality or academic status. It is also the occasion of the annual
meeting of the Byzantine Studies Association of North America (BSANA), conducted by its officers.

For more information, please consult the BSANA website, http://www.bsana.net, which will be updated in the
coming months as new information becomes available.

We welcome proposals on any aspect of Byzantine studies. For full details, download the Call for Papers.


“Auctor est aequivocum”: Authenticity, Authority and Authorship from the Classical Antiquity to the Middle Ages

International conference/Call for papers (closes 30 April 2017)

26-27 October 2017, University of Bari, Italy

Prolepsis Association is delighted to announce its second international postgraduate conference whose theme will be the investigation into the concepts of authenticity and authorship of literary and historical texts from the Classical Antiquity to the Medieval and the Byzantine Age

For full Call for Papers, see the website.


Call for Papers for Symposium in Honour of Professor George Vellenis (closes 31 March 2017)

The Symposium is planned for October 5-6, 2017 at Thessaloniki, Greece.
Scholars and experts from Greece and abroad are invited to participate and present their papers on ancient Greek and Byzantine History and Archaeology, Architecture, Painting, Sculpture, Minor Arts, Epigraphy and other fields. The presentations will be of 15 minutes duration and can be delivered in Greek, English or French.

For further details, download the call for papers and participation form.


10th International Conference for Doctoral Students of Byzantium

Call for papers (closes 10 March 2017)

6-7 October 2017, Paris, France

For details, download the call for papers.


Gregory of Nyssa and his Byzantine Reception

International conference/Call for papers (closes 30 September 2017)

4-7 September 2018, Paris, France

The XIVth international conference on Gregory of Nyssa will take place in Paris, Collège des Bernardins, from Tuesday 4th to Friday 7th of September 2018. It will focus on the Homilies on the Lord’s Prayer and their reception in the byzantine world.

For full details, see the website.


Editing Late-Antique and Early Medieval Texts. Problems and Challenges

International Workshop/Call for papers (closes 30 May 2016)
23-24 November 2017, University of Lisbon, Portugal

This workshop aims at fostering and promoting the exchange of ideas on how to edit Late-Antique and Early-Medieval texts. By presenting case-studies, participants will be encouraged to share the editorial problems and methodological challenges that they had to face in order to fulfil their research or critical editions.

For full details, see the website.


George Pisides Workshop

31 March 2017, University of Tubignen, Germany

For details, please download the programme.


Preserving, Commenting, Adapting: Commentaries on Ancient Texts in Twelfth-Century Byzantium

International workshop/Call for Papers (closes 30 April 2017)

20-21 October 2017, University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland

In this workshop, we propose to explore the use of ancient texts in twelfth-century Byzantium through commentaries. Classical scholarship flourished in twelfth-century Constantinople; scholars such as Eustathios of Thessalonike and John Tzetzes undertook ambitious projects of Homeric exegesis, while Eustratios of Nicaea produced commentaries on various of Aristotle’s works. In a broader sense, treatises like those by John Tzetzes on ancient tragedy and comedy or literary works such as Theodore Prodromos’ Katomyomachia and Bion Prasis can also be said to comment on ancient texts and, thus, reveal the manifold ways in which Byzantines dealt with their ancient heritage.

For details, download the full Call for Papers.


Literature Squared: Metaliterary Reflections in Late Antiquity

International conference/Call for Papers (closes 15 May 2017)

6-7 October 2017, University of Salamanca, Spain 

The fifth annual conference of the International Society for Late Antique Literary Studies (ISLALS) will convene at the University of Salamanca (Spain) on October 6–7, 2017, following the successful meetings in the USA (Brown 2013, Boston 2014, Bryn Mawr and Haverford 2016) and the UK (Oxford 2015).

Under the motto “Literature squared”, this year’s conference will cover a wide range of topics directly related to the general idea of literature speaking of, commenting on, or contrasting with, literature itself: from metaliterary prooemia and self-referential pieces/passages, to Christian and pagan exegesis (commentaries, metatexts, paratexts, allegorical re-readings, rhetorical treatises, hermeneutics, etc), via all kind of self-aware “derivative” genres (such as centos, epitomes, translations, paraphrases, etc). Intertextual dialogues will be also taken into consideration, provided that they focus on strictly (meta-)literary issues. Finally, special attention will be paid to the study of the late antique philosophical inquiries on the ideas of fictionality, language, representation and literature.

Communications will be 20 minutes long, with 10 additional minutes for questions and discussion. English and Spanish will be the accepted languages. Depending on the quality and coherence of the presentations the publication of a collected volume will be envisaged. Both senior scholars and early career researchers (including PhD students) are welcome (and encouraged) to submit paper proposals. If you would like to participate, please send an abstract of your paper (200-300 words) via email attachment by 

May 15, 2017 to the organizers: Jesús Hernández Lobato (jhlobato@usal.es) and Óscar Prieto Domínguez (praxo@usal.es). Please include your academic affiliation.

ISLALS requires no dues and there is no registration fee for the conference. A closing banquet for conference speakers will round out this year’s gathering, commemorating the eighth centenary of the foundation of the University of Salamanca, the third oldest in continuous operation in Europe. Expenses for lodging and travel to and from the conference will be the responsibility of participants. The organizers can help participants secure lodging at nearby hotels. Additional information about the conference can be found at: salamancaislals.wordpress.com

Please send queries about conference particulars to the organizers: Jesús Hernández Lobato (jhlobato@usal.es) and Óscar Prieto Domínguez (praxo@usal.es) .General queries about ISLALS may be sent to any member of the steering committee: Scott McGill (smcgill@rice.edu), Joseph Pucci (Joseph_Pucci@brown.edu) and David Bright (dbright@emory.edu).


The 8th Century: Patterns of Transition in Economy and Trade Throughout the Late
Antique, Early Medieval and Islamicate Mediterranean

International conference/Call for papers (closes 15 January 2017)

4-7 October 2017, Berlin, Germany

The “8th century" has been historically and archaeologically considered a sort of watershed between Antiquity and the Middle Ages. The definition of the transformations in this period is a crucial issue, especially concerning continuity and
change of the economic structures in the Late Antique Mediterranean world. The aim of this international interdisciplinary conference is to bring together scholars from several disciplines, including Late Antique, Islamic, Byzantine and Medieval History, Archaeology, Archaeometry, Numismatics, Philology and Papyrology, dealing with the 8th century’s threshold from different perspectives, in order to re-evaluate the problematic of this transition in terms of continuity/disruption by combining archaeological data and written—literary as well as documentary—sources.

We are planning to have thematic sessions with key notes (35 plus 10 minutes) and papers (20 plus 10 minutes), a poster session, and a concluding round table. We would ask those of you who indicate their wish to participate with a paper/poster to provide us with an abstract and a working title by 15 January 2017. We are attempting to arrange for the funding of all travel and accommodation expenses.

For further details, download the full call for papers.


Medieval Rites: Reading the Writing

Conference/Call for papers (closes 1 January 2017)

21-23 April 2017, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA

To study the history of the Christian liturgy is usually to study texts. Though some texts survive even from the period of the early Church, it was mostly during the Middle Ages that thousands of texts—prayers, hymns, and lections—were compiled and organized into large and complex liturgical books. Some of these medieval liturgical books continued to be used by worshipers even into modern times, or served as models or anti-models for compilers of post-medieval liturgical books.

Moving beyond the notion that writing was simply a means of coordinating ritual activity, or an alternative to oral transmission, Medieval Rites: Reading the Writing will explore the breadth of possible literate interactions with Christian liturgy during, before, and after the Middle Ages, in both Eastern and Western traditions.

Anyone interested in reading a 20-minute paper at the conference may send a 300-word abstract to ismevents@yale.edu, by 1 January 2017.

Authors of accepted proposals will be notified by email no later than the end of January.

For further details, download the full Call for Papers.


Building, Bending and Breaking Boundaries in the Eastern Mediterranean World

Fifth CEMS International Graduate Conference/Call for papers (closes 31 January)

1-3 June 2017, Central European University, Budapest, Hungary

The Center for Eastern Mediterranean Studies (CEMS) at Central European University and its junior members are proud to announce the forthcoming Fifth International Graduate Conference on Building, Bending, and Breaking Boundaries in the Eastern Mediterranean World. This three-day conference invites graduate students of Late Antique, Islamic, Jewish, Byzantine, Medieval, Ottoman studies, and other related disciplines, to present their research on the manifold and complex processes of constructing, negotiating, transgressing, and subverting social, political, cultural or confessional boundaries in the eastern Mediterranean from Antiquity to the Early Modern period.

Please submit by January 31, 2017 a short paper proposal (no more than 250 words, together with a brief biography and contact information) to the following address: cemsconference(at)ceu.edu

All participants will be offered accommodation for the full duration of the conference (3 nights) at the CEU Residence Center. In order to encourage the participation of individuals with limited institutional support a small number of partial travel grants will be available to cover travel expenses. Those who wish to be considered for the grant should include an additional justification alongside their paper proposals. Please note that there is no conference fee. For further information, do not hesitate to contact the organizers at cemsconference@ceu.edu .

For further details, download the full CfP.


Archaeology and History of Lydia from the Earliest Lydian Period to Late Antiquity (8th century BC-6th century AD)

International Symposium/Call for Papers (closes 1 January 2017)

17-18 May, Izmir, Turkey

The Izmir Center of the Archaeology of Western Anatolia (EKVAM) is glad to inform you that an
international symposium on the region Lydia in western Turkey will take place on May 17-18, 2017 at the
Dokuz Eylül University (DEU) in Izmir, Turkey. Lydia was an ancient region, located in inner western
Anatolia, stretching from today’s Turkish province of Manisa in the west to Usak in the east. Since the book
of C.H. Roosevelt, entitled “The Archaeology of Lydia, from Gyges to Alexander”, archaeologically and
historically Lydia became a special focus in the fields of ancient Anatolian studies. We warmly invite
contributions by scholars and graduate students from a variety of disciplines related to this region. The aim of
this symposium is to report on the state of research concerning Lydia between c. 8th century B.C. and 6th
century A.D. Intended to bring together scholars of archaeology, history, historical geography, epigraphy and
other related disciplines in ancient Anatolian studies to discuss a range of issues concerning this region’s
archaeology and history, this symposium should be an excellent opportunity to increase our knowledge about
this region.

For further details, download the full Call for Papers.


RECEPTION HISTORIES OF THE FUTURE: a conference on Byzantinisms, speculative fiction, and the literary heritage of medieval empire

Conference (call for papers closes 28 February 2017)

4-6 August 2017, Uppsala University

The study of Classical reception in modern speculative fiction (science fiction and fantasy) is an old and broad field, with roots in both the academy and the popular press. However, much as Classics is often reluctant to look beyond the temporal borders of the antique world and venture into its medieval Greek imperial successor, the consideration of classical reception in speculative fiction has mostly neglected the significant impact of Byzantium and other post-Roman imperial formations and their literatures on modern SFF. However, many of the central thematic tenets of the literary heritage of medieval empire – including but not limited to decadence, the post-Roman world, the problem of defining barbarian and citizen, and the use of 'Byzantine' settings and symbology as codes for the foreign or exotic – have had deep effects on the development of science fiction and fantasy in the 20th and 21st centuries.

This conference aims to bring together some of the most innovative modern writers of speculative fiction with scholars working at the cutting edge of Byzantine reception studies for a two-day discussion of Byzantinism, decadence, empire, and storytelling. The conference will therefore collapse the distance between practitioners and critics, and bring reception studies into a direct dialogue with one of today's most vibrant genres of popular fiction. Planned activities include public events at local bookstores, presentations of scholarly papers, and group panel discussions between writers and scholars. A post-conference publication will include both essays, academic articles, and commissioned fiction.

Call for Papers (Academic Track) – Deadline February 28, 2017

Please submit an abstract of approximately 300 words which describes research which responds to or contributes to the discussion of Byzantine and post-Roman reception in speculative fiction, to annalinden.weller(at)lingfil.uu.se.

Alternately or additionally, suggest topics for group panel discussions which you would be interested in participating in, alongside writers and other creative professionals.

Call for Interest & Panel Topics (Creative Track) – Deadline February 28, 2017

If you are a speculative fiction writer or industry professional who would like to participate in the conference, write to arkady.martine(at)gmail.com with your contact details, professional experience, and ideas for panels.

For Full details, see http://www.historiesofthefuture.net/news/


Constructing Sacred Space: A Career Celebration for Robert Ousterhout

Conference

7-9 April 2017, The University Museum at the University of Pennsylvania, USA

Full program and details at : www.sas.upenn.edu/arthistory/events/constructing-sacred-space-career-celebration-robert-ousterhout


Concealment and Revelation in the Art of the Middle Ages

Conference/Call for Papers (closes30 April 2017)

22-24 September, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus

The present conference aspires to explore the role of the concept and the act of concealment and revelation in the arts of the Latin West, Byzantium, Islam and Judaism in the course of the Middle Ages (defined chronologically as c. 500-c. 1500). Subjects to be broached include, but are not limited to, the use of curtains or veils in screening objects or spaces; the function of permeable screens (in a variety of materials and media) in structuring accessibility, whether physical, visual, aural or spiritual; the performative aspect of concealing and revealing in all its civic and private manifestations, and the issues of emotional manipulation thereby raised; the role of gesture and spatial motion in the performance of concealment and revelation; the hierarchy of sacred and secular space as the outcome of its compartmentalisation; and the representation of these practices in the pictorial arts.

The conference is planned as a three-day event, to take place at the Archaeological Research Unit of the University of Cyprus, Nicosia, in 22-24 September 2017. Due to budgetary constraints, the speakers’ travel and accommodation expenses cannot be covered, but every effort will be made to secure conference rates at hotels near the conference venue. There is no registration fee for participation or attendance.

Prospective speakers are invited to submit electronically a title and a 300-word abstract (in either English or Greek) for consideration by 30 April 2017. Please send all materials and address all queries to the conference convenors, Michalis Olympios (olympios.michalis@ucy.ac.cy) and Maria Parani (mparani(at)ucy.ac.cy).

For further details, download the full CfP.


The Journal of Modern Hellenism

Call for submissions

The Journal of Modern Hellenism is seeking submissions from emerging and established scholars on the history, language, and culture of Greece and the Greek Diaspora, from Middle Byzantium to the Modern Era.

Since 1984, the JMH has served as a forum for the promotion of scholarly work on the history, language, institutions, and culture of the Greek people from the Byzantine period to the present. In 2014, the journal moved online and is now hosted on an open access publication platform developed by the Public Knowledge Project. In 2016 the JMH renewed its editorial board and moved to a rolling publication model, which allows for a much shorter publication cycle than other academic journals. Articles are published online as soon as they complete the peer-review process.

The JMH is a joint publication of the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Centre for Hellenic Studies, the Center for Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies of Queens College, City University of New York, and the Hellenic Studies Program at California State University, Sacramento.

For more information about the JMH and its submission guidelines or to view current and past issues of the journal, please visit us: http://www.sfu.ca/snfchs/JMH.html


Iconoclasm and Iconophilia

Conference (call for papers closes 30 January 2017)

1-3 June 2017, Rijeka, Croatia

The conference seeks to explore and discuss recent development in the dialogue between art history, history, theology, philosophy, and cultural theory concerning the perception and definition of iconoclasm(s) in history. From the word that developed on the aggressive statements and actions against images (especially within the reference to the historical disputes in Christianity) the term has come to be applied to actions or movements that challenge apprized values and cultivated beliefs. It has been recently discussed beyond the cultural and temporal boundaries, as well as being a transformative force in cultural production. When approached it usually stands opposite to iconophilia and throughout the history the clash between two terms produced not only theoretical background but also production of works of art that shape our understanding of a particular period or religious group. We welcome academic papers that will approach these subjects in interdisciplinary and methodologically diverse angles.

For details, see the full Call for Papers.


Fifth Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Conference/Call for papers (closes 31 December 2016)

19-21 June 2017, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO, USA

The Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies provides a convenient summer venue in North America for scholars in all disciplines to present papers, organize sessions, participate in roundtables, and engage in interdisciplinary discussion. The goal of the symposium is to promote serious scholarly investigation of the medieval and early modern worlds.

We invite proposals for papers, sessions, and roundtables on all topics and in all disciplines of medieval and early modern studies. Proposals from learned societies and scholarly associations are particularly welcome. The deadline for proposals submissions is December 31.

The plenary speakers for this year will be Christopher Baswell, of Barnard College and Columbia University, and Bruce Campbell, of Queen's University, Belfast.

The Symposium is held on the beautiful midtown campus of Saint Louis University, hosted by the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. On-campus housing options include affordable, air-conditioned apartments and a luxurious boutique hotel. Inexpensive dorm meal plans are available.

All sessions take place in state-of-the-art classrooms and auditoriums with complete audiovisual facilities. All sessions, events, meals, and housing are located within easy walking distance of each other. A rich variety of restaurants, bars, and cultural venues are also only a short walk away.

During their stay, participants are welcome to utilize the Vatican Film Library as well as the rare book and manuscript collections of the nearby Pius XII Library. Those interested in using the Vatican Film library, should contact Susan L'Engle (lengles@slu.edu) by email or phone at 314-977-3090. Participants may also use the library's regular collections, which are especially strong in medieval and early modern studies.

All sessions are 90 minutes long. A variety of session formats are welcome. Preference will be given to organized sessions that involve participants from multiple institutions.

To submit a proposal, click here.


Nea Paphos and Western Cyprus: New Archaeological and Historical Perspectives

International Colloquium/Call for Papers (closes 31 October 2016)

11-15 October 2017, Pafos, Cyprus

The main aim of this second scientific meeting, besides the presentation of new discoveries made by the archaeological missions currently working on the site, is to study the evolution of the city, as well as of that of other sites in Western Cyprus, from the Hellenistic period to Early Medieval times. The languages of the colloquium will be Greek and English.

For further details, download the Call for Papers.


IVth Forum Kunst des Mittelalters / Forum for Medieval Art

Conference/Call for Papers (closes 31 October 2016)

20-23 September 2017, Berlin & Brandenburg, Germany

Visit the website of the Forum for further details

Please send your paper proposals of max. 1 page to: mail(at)mittelalterkongress.de


5th Annual Multi-Disciplinary Conference on Medieval, Renaissance and Early Modern Studies

Call for Papers (closes 31 December 2016)

Officially entitled "Othello's Island", the conference is a truly multi-disciplinary event, looking at all aspects of the Medieval, Renaissance and Early Modern periods, including art, literature, history, culture etc. It takes place in Nicosia, Cyprus, next April (2017). The deadline for proposals is 31 December 2016.

Being located in Nicosia, our delegates also have an opportunity to explore the medieval sites of this fascinating city, from the stunning Byzantine Museum to the richly carved sculptures of the French gothic cathedral, and we will also be taking a trip out of town to visit other medieval and renaissance sites of beauty and interest in Cyprus.

The conference is held at the Centre for Visual Arts and Research (CVAR) in the heart of Nicosia's medieval Old Town, and is organised as a collaboration between academics from CVAR, Northern Arizona University, Sheffield Hallam University, SOAS University of London, the University of Kent, and the University of Leeds. Our keynote speaker for 2017 will be Professor Patricia F. Brown (Princeton, USA).

For research students and early career academics, we are able to offer a limited amount of free accommodation for the duration of the conference to speakers aged 35 or under.

For further information, please visit the website: www.othellosisland.org


In Search of Crusader Art: Current Approaches and New Perspectives

Conference/Call for Papers (closes 31 October 2016)

20-23 September 2017, Berlin, Germany

The aim of this session is to reflect critically on the limitations of terminology, while addressing issues of artistic transmission across the fluid borderland of the Medieval Mediterranean. It will seek to expand the cultural dialogue between the various religious and ethnic groups in the Eastern Mediterranean, by examining how Islamic, Syrian and Jewish artistic traditions interacted with the Byzantine and Western paradigms. It will attempt to identify the varied forms of crusader art that have emerged in recent years and explore how this revised corpus of crusader material challenges accepted notions. Finally, it will inquire whether crusader art, as an essentially transcultural contact zone, acted as an agent of separation, communication, or convergence.

This session invites papers which re-evaluate traditional approaches to crusader art, artefacts and architecture and seek to re-examine the interplay between material culture, patrons and artists. Participants are expected to explore the artistic interaction between the different ethnic groups in the region and are encouraged to explore a novel approach in defining the notion of crusader art.

Paper proposals of max. 1 paper are due by 31 October 2016 for the session organized by Ioanna Christoforaki at the 4th Forum Medieval Art, to be held in Berlin (20-23 September 2017). Send proposals at mail(at)mittelalterkongress.de

For details, download the full Call for Papers


From the Human Body to the Universe – Spatialities of Byzantine Culture

Conference

18-21 May 2017, Uppsala University, Sweden (CfP closes 30 September 2016)

If you are interested to attend by oral or poster presentation, please send an abstract of no more than 400 words, the thematic panel to which you would like to contribute and a brief CV to myrto.veikou(at)lingfil.uu.se by September 30, 2016.

The full call for papers can be found here.


Languages – Culture of Writing – Identities in Antiquity

15th International Congress of Greek and Latin Epigraphy

28 August-1 September 2017, Vienna, Austria (call for papers closes 30 April 2016)

Addressing this topic, two plenary sessions are dedicated to the relationship between the indigenous or local epigraphic cultures of the ancient Mediterranean area and the dominant respective Greek or Roman culture. The focus is on those regions and societies of the ancient world which have several languages and scripts existing simultaneously in their epigraphic culture. In a third plenary session outstanding new inscriptions will be presented. And finally the winners of the Géza Alföldy-scholarship (call and grant by the AIEGL) will present their papers in a fourth plenary session.
NB There will be a panel on Epigraphy of Late Antiquity and Byzantine age.

For details, download the full CfP.